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  1. Member
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    #1

    Question How does a person get a IT job that has A+/Network+ certs BUT no hands on???

    I have had the A+ and Network+ certifications SINCE 2008. I have 2 jobs 1 full time and 1 part time (neither are IT related). Every time I see a help desk or IT support postion, the description CLEARLY stated 1 to 2 years of experience. I DO NOT have ANY hands on experiencce whatsoever. I am a extremely fast learner and I feel I could be a assest to any business or corporation that wold give me a chance. Is anyone else dealing with a similar situation?-mjones
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  3. Member
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    #2
    I had my break working for a big box retail store..you might need to try and find a job at one of those OR try working those 1 or two day gigs from Craigslist
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  4. Junior Starcraft Engineer
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    #3
    Just apply. It's a catch-22 of job recruiting, and we've discussed it to oblivion on the these forums. You don't actually need to meet the experience requirements to get the jobs. You need to be able to demonstrate skills and potential in the interview, and to have a well-written resume to get the interview. You do not need to meet every check box.
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  5. Burn Baby Burn! Cisco Inferno's Avatar
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    #4
    Have an honest cover letter tailored to the position. Make sure you describe who you are as a person in it, as it will tell the employer everything that your resume doesn't.

    State that you have no professional experience though you are eager to learn.
    State that this is a hobby turned career and you have self experience from that involving basic OS and hardware troubleshooting.
    State that your self studying for those industry certifications showcase your new found technical knowledge and understanding which is required for the enterprise as well as how it proves your willingness to work independently and learn new things on your own.
    State your goals and aspirations within IT. (Employers want to know WHY you are applying. It shouldn't be about the cash)

    Entry level isn't about experience, its about how well you'll pick up experience and move forward.

    Those tips helped me get an IT job on Wall St when i was 19/20 with NO experience at all, besides A+ and N+.
    Last edited by Cisco Inferno; 04-04-2013 at 11:10 PM.
    2017 Goals
    [x] MCSA: Server 2012 [X]70-410 [X]70-411 [x]74-409

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  6. Senior Member bub9001's Avatar
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by ptilsen View Post
    Just apply. It's a catch-22 of job recruiting, and we've discussed it to oblivion on the these forums. You don't actually need to meet the experience requirements to get the jobs. You need to be able to demonstrate skills and potential in the interview, and to have a well-written resume to get the interview. You do not need to meet every check box.
    I agree with ptilsen, you don't have to be a perfect fit for the job posting. I would make sure your resume fits the job posting as close as possible. Don't send a cookie cutter resume and think that will do. Also keep in mind if it's a big company that has resources to flex software to scan resumes, then you need to look a key words in the job posting to be used in your resume you send. This sounds like a lot of work, but it may help you get the interview.
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  7. Senior Member Bokeh's Avatar
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    #6
    Volunteering is another good way to get experience. Check out volunteermatch.com . Search for IT and your city/zip code. You might find some organizations there that need help during evenings, or weekends. From those contacts, you might find others as well. Soon enough you will be on your way!
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  8. Member
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    #7
    Thank you!!!
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  9. Member
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    #8
    Can you be more specific about the day gigs on Craiglist?
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  10. Member
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    #9
    @Cisco Inferno-THANK YOU MAN!!!
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  11. Junior Starcraft Engineer
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    #10
    On Craigslist you will find day-long or week-long projects doing basic things like installing PCs. You will get some recruiter contacts on job sites as well. You can get similar work on Work Market. They are not the easier to put on a resume, but it's better than saying "I have absolutely no IT experience." The only "experience" I had with my first IT job was a few of those projects and freelance PC tech work. It's all about getting some kind of actual experience, even if it's not truly professional, and conveying it right. That being said, lots of companies will give you a chance without even that, but every little bit helps.
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  12. Burn Baby Burn! Cisco Inferno's Avatar
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by mjones View Post
    @Cisco Inferno-THANK YOU MAN!!!
    I lived my whole life in NYC, and moved to Miami a few months ago. I know how hard and competitive it can be. To be honest, expect to make around $14-15 maybe $16 starting out. Always value the experience more than the pay at this level. Make good connections and never stop learning.

    Keep your head up and toss that resume around left and right. Perhaps cold call places and ask if they are hiring. The worst that can happen is that they say no. Finding a job should be your full time job.

    I do plan on going back to NY after a year or two though. I know it isnt that bad at all.
    Last edited by Cisco Inferno; 04-04-2013 at 11:17 PM.
    2017 Goals
    [x] MCSA: Server 2012 [X]70-410 [X]70-411 [x]74-409

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  13. Senior Member
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    #12
    Apply with the city. Governments don't care about experience as long as you have the certs.
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