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  1. Member
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    #1

    Default Simulation / practice

    Good morning,

    In programming there is the concept of a 'code kata'. You basically solve the same problems over and over to reinforce the theory behind the code you're writing and to commit those to 'muscle memory' if you will.

    What I want to do is something similar but with using GNS3 or Packet Tracer. I want to have a default topology ex: 3 routers 3 switches x amount of end devices etc and go through the motions of base config, routing protocols, security, NAT .. so that it would cover whats on the ICND1 exam.

    Now, I don't believe that answering that question would violate the NDA as I am not asking for specifics. I do however, want to put in a sufficient amount of keyboard time before sitting for the exam.

    Any advice on this is welcome

    Thanks
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  3. Senior Member RouteMyPacket's Avatar
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    #2
    Quote Originally Posted by bradl3yC View Post
    Good morning,

    In programming there is the concept of a 'code kata'. You basically solve the same problems over and over to reinforce the theory behind the code you're writing and to commit those to 'muscle memory' if you will.

    What I want to do is something similar but with using GNS3 or Packet Tracer. I want to have a default topology ex: 3 routers 3 switches x amount of end devices etc and go through the motions of base config, routing protocols, security, NAT .. so that it would cover whats on the ICND1 exam.

    Now, I don't believe that answering that question would violate the NDA as I am not asking for specifics. I do however, want to put in a sufficient amount of keyboard time before sitting for the exam.

    Any advice on this is welcome

    Thanks
    I will tell you that you need to focus on the foundational topics. What does the ICND1 exam expect of you? This is the question everyone should focus on when looking at any exam.

    1. What is the exam based on, what are the percentages for each section/technology?


    6% 1.0 Operation of IP Data Networks

    Details

    21% 2.0 LAN Switching Technologies

    Details

    11% 3.0 IP addressing (IPv4 / IPv6)

    Details

    26% 4.0 IP Routing Technologies

    Details

    8% 5.0 IP Services

    Details

    15% 6.0 Network Device Security

    Details

    20% 7.0 Troubleshooting

    Details



    IP routing comes in at 26% with LAN Switching at 21% and on down the line. Now I would create a spreadsheet that breaks each section down, have a field for your competency level (be honest). You want to get to the point you look at the following under each section and have a solid competency of it, meaning you understand it and can apply it. understanding is the key to applying and provides the incite into "when" and "why" and the "where" you apply it.

    Here is Routing section
    • 4.1 Describe basic routing concepts
      • 4.1.a packet forwarding
      • 4.1.b router lookup process
      • 4.1.c Process Switching/Fast Switching/CEF
    • 4.2 Configure and verify utilizing the CLI to set basic router configuration
      • 4.2.a Hostname
      • 4.2.b Local user and password
      • 4.2.c Enable secret password
      • 4.2.d Console and VTY logins
      • 4.2.e exec-timeout
      • 4.2.f Service password encryption
      • 4.2.g Interface IP Address
      • 4.2.g (i) loopback
      • 4.2.h banner
      • 4.2.i MOTD
      • 4.2.j copy run start
    • 4.3 Configure and verify operation status of an Ethernet interface
      • 4.3.a Serial
      • 4.3.b Ethernet
    • 4.4 Verify router configuration and network connectivity using
      • 4.4.a ping
      • 4.4.a (i) Extended ping
      • 4.4.b traceroute
      • 4.4.c telnet
      • 4.4.d SSH
      • 4.4.e Show cdp neighbors
    • 4.5 Configure and verify routing configuration for a static or default
      route given specific routing requirements
    • 4.6 Differentiate methods of routing and routing protocols
      • 4.6.a Static vs. dynamic
      • 4.6.b Link state vs. distance vector
      • 4.6.c next hop
      • 4.6.d IP routing table
      • 4.6.e Passive Interfaces (how they work)
    • 4.7 Configure and verify OSPF
      • 4.7.a Benefit of single area
      • 4.7.b Configure OSPv2 in a single area
      • 4.7.c Configure OSPv3 in a single area
      • 4.7.d Router ID
      • 4.7.e Passive Interface in a single area
    • 4.8 Configure and verify interVLAN routing (Router on a stick)
      • 4.8.a Sub interfaces
      • 4.8.b Upstream routing
      • 4.8.c Encapsulation
    • 4.9 Configure SVI interfaces
    You can use the Cisco docs for all of this, they are telling you plainly what is expected of you. Some items you will already know and maybe just need to skim through to refresh, if so great then move onto the next section.
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  4. Member
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    #3
    RMP,

    Thanks so much. That helps immensely.
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