+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 25 of 32
  1. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    18
    #1

    Default What Does a Network Engineer do???

    Hey, I'm new to the Cisco World, and I want to try to get a job as a Network Engineer in the future, but of course that takes study, certifications and other stuff... I'm curious to know though... What does a Network Engineer do?

    If anyone is a Network Engineer then let me know what it's like in everyday activities because I wanna know if it's something I wanna do. Thanks people!
    Reply With Quote Quote  


  2. Login/register to remove this advertisement.
  3. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    18
    #2
    So nobody is an Engineer?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. Grumpy old bugger RussS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton - New Zealand
    Posts
    2,117
    #3
    As little as possible for the greatest possible renumeration


    In reality our network engineer spends his time reading screens of data traffic and overdosing on coffee trying to keep awake. That and spening hours on the phone to various clients ISPs trying to explain to them how their networks are falling over and how to put things right.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    485

    Certifications
    Yes
    #4

    Default Re: What Does a Network Engineer do???

    Quote Originally Posted by hackdugood
    What does a Network Engineer do?
    Whatever my boss tells me to do....
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Cisco Moderator mikej412's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    10,192

    Certifications
    CCNP CCIP CCSP CCVP CCDP CCDA CCNA CS-CIPSS CS-CIPTDS CS-CIPTOS CS-CIPCSS CS-CFWS CS-CVPNS CS-CISecS ISSP 4013 4011
    #5
    Search Monster, HotJobs, Careerbuilder, etc., and see what employers and recruiters put in their job descriptions.

    And then realize that no job description survives contact with a customer.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,939

    Certifications
    yes
    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by mikej412
    Search Monster, HotJobs, Careerbuilder, etc., and see what employers and recruiters put in their job descriptions.
    The majority of posts on techexams can be found between 8AM-5PM..
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    462

    Certifications
    MCSE 2k3, MCSA: Messaging 2k3, Net+
    #7
    Don't believe anything Mike says. He really works selling carpets in a small shop in Mumbai.

    His certs are just whatever keys popped up while banging his head on the keyboard.

    Too much Moutain Dew.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  9. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    462

    Certifications
    MCSE 2k3, MCSA: Messaging 2k3, Net+
    #8
    On a serious note:

    Day to Day depends on what work you do. If you work for a large company, chances are that you will be doing the same routine over and over again. People usually have duties/jobs assigned to the position. Unless you move up, you will be a pro at wasting the day while bored.

    Smaller companies will allow you more hands on variety. You will learn to be a jack of all trades.

    Working for a consulting company allows me to work on 50 different clients at once. Each office is varied in its applications and hardware. Plus, I always interact with diff people. Every office has idiots, but I don't have to deal with the same guy all day long ******* me off. Every year experience I gain is worth 2-3 anywhere else. You have to be fast on your feet and know your stuff... Plus its where the $$ is.

    I am challenged all day long and love what I do. I have a desire for knowledge and already have the next 5 certs I want to attain lined up and scheduled for the next 3-4 years... (maybe longer if I flunk the lab a few times)
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  10. Senior Member kadshah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Inwood NYC
    Posts
    381

    Certifications
    A+ Network+ Security + MCP & CCNA
    #9
    What does a Network Engineer do?
    look for work as a network engineer.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  11. Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    805

    Certifications
    CCNA, CCNP, CCIE#38186(R&S), JNCIA-JUNOS, JNCIS-SEC, JNCIP-SEC, JNCIS-ENT, F50-531, F50-533
    #10
    Im a network engineer for a company that employees about 500 people all over Australia.

    My job is to basically make sure that the network is up and running 100% of the time between all sites. I also provide user support to employees all over Australia.

    I manage about 20 servers 8 routers and a bunch of switches, firewalls. Also things like our Exchange Server, ISA server, payroll software, accounting software blah blah blah..

    I also am responsible for making sure our hardware can handle the load that is placed on it, and i set up and configure any new hardware we need which could be anything from a PC to a Server to a router or firewall...

    my job is pretty varied, i get to travel all over Australia and im always busy, its a great job for people who like all things I.T
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  12. Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    106

    Certifications
    A+
    #11
    Sounds like the job for me
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  13. Coffee anyone? rossonieri#1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    800

    Certifications
    a few...
    #12
    hello,

    AFA my history concerned - i think go here and there - meet customers - analyzed their existing network - propose a solution - changing here and there - doing lots of implementations. Some of them include dirty job like physical cable installation (in case of urgent), testing fiber termination etc.
    read lots of docs - do trial and error in lab.

    cheers...
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  14. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    www.cisco-engineer.com, Reading UK
    Posts
    665

    Certifications
    CCNA, CCDA, CCNP, CCDP, CCIP, CCSP, CCIE R&S (Written), Network+, MCP, MBCS
    #13
    While Im more of a designer which is a different job in itself, I still class myself as a Network engineer, my official title is "Senior Network Design and implementation Engineer"

    I work for a large company, normally I get given a requirement, ie we need a network that can do this and this, and it must cost less then x.

    I then go away figure out what equipment is needed, and draft a solution, I have access to a large "sandpit" area to try stuff out. I will then put forward a proposal, after that, its build a pilot model, do some testing etc, then support it while the server guys etc do their bits, tweak and optimize. Once everyone is happy I produce a final document with the configs etc, its then handed over to the support/build dapartment. The only involvement I have with it after that point is 4th line defects etc.

    I like the range it gives me, and the fact that I decide what equipment/solution etc goes in, so its non-repatative. On the down side it requires a lot of supporting documentation to be produced, ie config docs, desgin docs, and fault finding guides.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  15. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    18
    #14
    Wow, sounds like a task for the mind. Very interesting, something I wouldn't mind doing, Thanks guys!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  16. Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Internet
    Posts
    296
    #15
    Let's see...
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  17. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    630

    Certifications
    A+,N+,I-net+,S+ Subject Matter Expert, CCNP,DP,SP, OSWP, CISSP#30711,CRISC,OSWP,GCIH
    #16
    Many people that have newly purchased a Network Administrator either don’t understand them or need advice on how to handle one. Below are frequently asked questions to better help you work with your new network administrator.

    Q: My network administrator seems distant, and doesn’t want to socialize with the other workers.

    A: NAs are private beings that interact best in Internet chat rooms and e-mail rather then on a more personal level. Just give your NA some space and he or she might come to you on their own. It may also be that your NA is lonely or exhausted. If after a year your, NA still doesn’t fit in, try hiring another one.

    Q: My network administrator constantly insults the other workers.

    A: It is never a NA intention to purposely insult a co-worker. It is just there are many times when your NA is working on several issues at once, (a thing that we like to call, multi-tasking) and the section of their brain that is responsible for pleasantries is pre-occupied with running the network, all the servers, the workstations, website, mail servers, SQL server, hubs, switches, routers, and the backing up of mission critical data. And when someone interrupts their train of thought by asking a stupid question, a NA responds the best way he or she can without actually strangling you to death.

    Q: My network administrator doesn’t seem to have a *****?

    A: Ah, do not be concerned. If your NA doesn’t have a *****, it is most likely that you have purchased a female model. Do not let this alarm you! You can treat her exactly the same as if she did have a *****. If however, the absence of a johnson is just too confusing for you, you may order replacement parts or an add-on. However, we don’t recommend that you do this as it will most likely slow down, even retard your unit.

    Q: My network administrator doesn’t want to spend his or her days off repairing home computers.

    A: Network administrators are very selfish with their free time, days off and vacations. A lot of managers don’t understand this and are often confused by the unwillingness of a NA to repair co-worker’s home computers on the weekends...what was your question again.

    Q: My network administrator has access to important company data and e-mail. Should I be concerned that he or she might use this data against me or my company at a later date?

    A: This is a common concern with many owners of a network administrator. Understand that a network administrator is a professional and only handles your data and never looks at it. However, there have been some isolated cases where some network administrators have malfunctioned as a result of being replaced with overseas replacement workers or laid-off due to failing to report correct corporate earners to the government. And yes it is true that many of these "disgruntled" network administrators helped lead government investigators to hidden corporate data. But this doesn't mean it can happen to you. Providing that you haven't been guilty of any of the above actions.

    Q: How should I manage my Network Administrator?

    A: NA need little managing. The difficulties with trying to manage a NA is that most managers know nothing about computers, networks or well anything technical. So to try and manage a person that has a far more superior brain than your own, would be insane. Our best advice to you is; let your NA do his or her job without interfering. Your company will be better for it.

    Q: My NA uses words and a language that I find difficult to understand.

    A: NA are trained in a language different than the one you were taught to use in your communications, liberal arts class, or that MBA. NA speaks in acronyms and only use the 0 and 1s in numbers. This is why purchasing a 10K piece of computer equipment doesn’t seem that unreasonable. If you are having troubling understanding your NA, just ask him or her to explain what they are talking about. NAs are always willing to explain terms. Although, be prepared to feel stupid.

    Q: My NA dresses different than the rest of us?

    A: Your NA has a very good understanding of the importance of corporate appearances. IBM, Ford and Microsoft have all realized that people work better when they can dress however they want. Your NA is simply dressing the way that he or she can better perform their duties.

    A: My NA won’t address me by my title, and doesn’t seem to respect me?

    Q: Sadly you speak the truth; your NA doesn’t respect you. Many managers believe themselves to be on a higher level than a computer genius. If you can’t correctly program your home VCR to stop flashing 12:00 every time your power goes out than how can you really expect your NA to respect you?

    Q: My NA repeatedly touches himself and it makes the other staff members uncomfortable?

    A: If your NA repeatedly touches his or her genitals in public it could mean that your NA contracted cyber herpes. If this is the case it should be treated immediately. It also falls within Plan B of your company medical benefits.

    Q: My NA eats the other workers lunches in the company refrigerator.

    A: This is a common complaint and one that you should address immediately. Network administrators that eat out of the company refrigerator can contract dysentery and sever stomach ulcers. If this is happening to you, make sure your NA takes a lunch break either off site or in his or her office behind a shut door without being disturbed.

    Q: My NA is writing a book, reading the news on the Internet, playing computer games, talking to friends on the phone and building paper machete statues from the magazines of computer parts companies.

    A: Don’t worry. If your NA is doing all of this, it is because he or she is happy and considers the workplace their home. This is most likely contributed to them spending more time at work than at home. Many NAs may not even remember they have a real home. If this type of behavior bothers you than it is recommended that you hire another NA so your current one can go home.

    Q: My NA did something good, but I don’t know how to reward him or her, so I did nothing?
    A: If your NA is constantly doing good things for you and your company, here are a few recommended ways to show your appreciation:

    · Show him or her some respect

    · Compliment your NA from time to time to show you care

    · Be a little understanding when your NA works all night, goes home at 8AM and tries to get a little sleep before coming back at noon.

    · Money: NA always view a raise or bonus as a sign you appreciate them.

    Q: My NA did something bad, and I want to punish him.

    · Don’t. 30 years of psychological research has shown that punishing your NA will have sever long-term effects on how and when the government audits your company.

    · Don’t be afraid to apologize if you’re wrong.

    · Don’t jump to conclusions because in most cases you don’t know what the hell you are talking about.

    · Don’t leave your banking account number or social security number on your computer.

    · Don’t have an inter office affair. Your NA will always know. And mostly likely, he is sleeping with her too.


    Q: I can’t believe that my NA is worth what I am paying him or her?

    A: Imagine what your company would be like if all your computers suddenly stopped working and no one could perform their daily duties. Ask yourself, how many people depend on their computers and database to do their jobs? Now, how much more would you be willing to pay to make all of that happen again? Allot more, uh?

    Q: My network administrator makes obscure and meaningless jokes that no one else understands?

    A: Ah, this is a tough one. Don’t try to understand the humor of a NA and don’t ask them to explain the joke. You have a better chance understanding how hydrogen is boiled off a star than you would understanding the humor of a network administrator. No, a star like the Sun, not like the movies.

    Q: Where do I return my network administrator if he or she doesn’t work out?

    A: Remember, you don't own a network administrator. They perform a necessary function that keeps your company running. If not for the network administrator you would still be using paper ledgers and abacuses.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  18. Senior Member kadshah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Inwood NYC
    Posts
    381

    Certifications
    A+ Network+ Security + MCP & CCNA
    #17


    -k
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  19. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,830

    Certifications
    Studying IE lab
    #18
    Quote Originally Posted by garv221
    Quote Originally Posted by mikej412
    Search Monster, HotJobs, Careerbuilder, etc., and see what employers and recruiters put in their job descriptions.
    The majority of posts on techexams can be found between 8AM-5PM..

    LMAO
    Become the stainless steel sharp knife in a drawer full of rusty spoons
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  20. Johan Hiemstra Site Admin Webmaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    52n31, 6e06
    Posts
    10,372
    Blog Entries
    3

    Certifications
    MCSE NT4 MCSA 2000/2003 Security+ (expired: CWNA, CNA, CCNA)
    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by keenon
    Quote Originally Posted by garv221
    The majority of posts on techexams can be found between 8AM-5PM..
    LMAO
    Ditto
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  21. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,939

    Certifications
    yes
    #20
    Darkuser..wow, I just copied that and created a pdf for my personal docs.

    It really depends..A network engineer can have some sys admin & vice versa.
    When I was a network engineer I setup/maintained Cisco PIX's, switches, layer 3 switches, routers, ATM connections, handled security at the network level. I also carved out a 50MB pipe by subnets, vlans creating partitions for applications and bandwidth throttling for a couple thousand people.

    When I was a sys admin I setup/maintained DNS, AD, Servers, backup, sharepoint..Anything OS related.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  22. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    www.cisco-engineer.com, Reading UK
    Posts
    665

    Certifications
    CCNA, CCDA, CCNP, CCDP, CCIP, CCSP, CCIE R&S (Written), Network+, MCP, MBCS
    #21
    hahahaha nice one best laught Ive had all day, I should forward this on to my project manager
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  23. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    656

    Certifications
    BSCI,BCMSN,CCNA
    #22
    network administrator/engineer/analyst...pretty much do all the same thing.


    As an analyst, I really don't analyze a damn thing, I put out fires all the time. I work in the corporate infrastructure service dept (fancy word for corporate IT) and help manage the network for over 700 of our network sites, which range from small readymix sites to our two datacenters.

    My daily jobs:

    -Support (I am a fireman)
    -Design (Visio, you gotta love it)
    -Implementation (migrations, configuration of new devices)
    -Manage network services (CW,TACACS,solarwinds, vpn concentrators)
    -Emails (should have it's own bullet point)

    That is all I can think of at this moment.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  24. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Winnipeg, MB.
    Posts
    188

    Certifications
    A+, N+, CST, CNST, MCSA 2003
    #23
    I'm a server guy, but around here the two guys handling network support and consulting are responsible for a project consisting of a large WAN, 15,000 computers and 4,000 printers across 300 sites and 2 datacenters housing 160 servers, using Cisco switches and routers and a wide variety of perimeter devices and services.

    They're part of a large national team which provides 24x7 support on a variety of contracts across the globe, so they are certainly not locked in to a specific role, and are often called upon to share their expertise on other projects.

    And locally we employ about 400, but worldwide it's closer to 200,000, with only a small amount of networking guys (support, design, implementation).
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  25. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    117

    Certifications
    National IT learning centre exam 35: Microcomputer hardware, NITLC exam 34: Network fundamentals, CompTIA Network +. Working on CCNA
    #24
    A network engineer, sytems technician, IT support technician, field engineer, they come under all names and guises, basicly you have a understanding of how networking operates, you design, install, upgrade, maintain and support the network.

    Thats the way network+ looks at things, now CCNA and MCSA/MCSE, CNE, are all vendor specific tracks, while CompTIA's certs are all, more or less Vendor neutral, maybe you could do one or two of CompTIA's certs b4 going into CCNA field, IMO that is.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  26. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,239
    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by mikey_b
    ... the two guys handling network support and consulting are responsible for a project consisting of a large WAN, 15,000 computers and 4,000 printers across 300 sites and 2 datacenters housing 160 servers, using Cisco switches and routers and a wide variety of perimeter devices and services.

    They're part of a large national team which provides 24x7 support on a variety of contracts across the globe, so they are certainly not locked in to a specific role, and are often called upon to share their expertise on other projects.
    Nice !
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Social Networking & Bookmarks