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  1. Junior Member
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    Apr 2007
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    #1

    Default Gateway of last resort is not set

    What does this mean exactly.
    Thanks.
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  3. Senior Member
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    #2
    Ed may chime in with more specific info, but basically it just means that you have not set a default route. If you set a default route, then the IP address of the next hop router you input in the default route command would become the gateway.
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  4. The Colosus of Clout Paul Boz's Avatar
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    #3
    Default routes (gateway of last resort) are static routes set up to prevent your router from dropping packets with destinations to remote networks that aren't in your routing table. For example, I've got a default route set up to route all non-lan traffic out of the router port which my ISP's connection is plugged into. In effect, any traffic that's not meant to stay on my lan is forwarded to my ISP (internet/email/etc). If I didn't have a gateway of last resort established I'd have to create a routing table entry for my ISP connection and make it a passive interface. It's a big pain in the butt compared to just setting a gateway of last resort.

    Here is a quick guide about default routes and how to configure them. It's quite simple!

    http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/105/default.html
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  5. Member
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    Arlington, TX
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Boz
    Default routes (gateway of last resort) are static routes set up to prevent your router from dropping packets with destinations to remote networks that aren't in your routing table. For example, I've got a default route set up to route all non-lan traffic out of the router port which my ISP's connection is plugged into. In effect, any traffic that's not meant to stay on my lan is forwarded to my ISP (internet/email/etc). If I didn't have a gateway of last resort established I'd have to create a routing table entry for my ISP connection and make it a passive interface. It's a big pain in the butt compared to just setting a gateway of last resort.

    Here is a quick guide about default routes and how to configure them. It's quite simple!

    http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/105/default.html
    Great info. So if I have a DSL router, and I set up my home lab with it connected to my Cisco routers, I would set the default gateway to the DSL routers gateway, right? (ex: ip default-gateway 192.168.6.254)*


    *NOT MY REAL GATEWAY......
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