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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Default New cisco cert!! CCENT

    Hey what do you guys think of the new cisco cert coming out the CCENT Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician???
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  3. Senior Member
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    #2
    Seems like if you basically pass the equivalent of the Intro exam you get this cert ( well the Intro is replace by ICND1, but I'm sure they are going to be very similar). It's nice for those of us who are going the 2 test option to be able to have a cert on the way to the CCNA.
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  4. Senior Member
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    #3
    I wouldn't mind looking into it. But, would it even be worth getting? Everyone's thoughts?
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  5. The Colosus of Clout Paul Boz's Avatar
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    #4
    I think it's a bad idea and slightly "cheapifies" the CCNA. The CCNA is easy enough to get - there shouldn't be a double certificate for it. It's basically like saying "here's a reward for taking the two test route." I don't think employers will care about it because it's not a full CCNA, so if it doesn't have value in the job market I don't see why Cisco's bothering. It's not like you get a "mini CCNP" cert every time you pass one of the four required exams for it.
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    #5
    I was thinking the same thing. A test is test, right? So why get that "title" if you are going to at least a CCNA for the majority of entry-level jobs anyway. Just my thoughts from the little bit I know about the new cert and from what I have read from here.
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  7. Senior Member
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    #6
    Ohh snap i just realized the ICND and INTRO exams as we know it are retiring and being replaced with ICND1 & ICND2...lol

    I knew the 640-801 is gonna be updated to 640-802 but now its starting to make sense. It's really basically the same thing just different names and updated topics i guess as it relates to the CCNA track.

    I like how they said ICND1 is required for the CCENT though. That way for guys just starting they can take ICND1 be mailed a certificate and put that cert on the wall...and well now I've been mailed this nice cert from cisco I have more motivation to prep for ICND2 and now put the CCNA cert under thier belt also. Hey the way I see it the more certs on the resume the more marketable you become. Just the letters in your title keeps you wanting more.

    I think It's great. "Already-CCNA's" like myself probably wont see the light initially...but for persons wanting to obtain CCNA certification I think it's extremely advantagous.
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  8. Johan Hiemstra Site Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #7
    It's obvious Cisco wants the 2-exam route to be the common route, making the 1-exam route an exception like the composite exam for the CCNP. Which makes sense because after the OSPF, VLSM and more switching topics where added the last update, with the wireless and other basic network additions this time, it's a whole lot of material to cover for a single exam. By itself it's good for the value of the CCNA, as it will 'usually' take 2 exams, and includes another cert. And as TechExams.net we will support that move too as this new structure makes it more convenient for me to write for the exams. Which basically means we'll have material for the ICND1 and ICND2 separately and not combine them into exams/notes/labs specifically for the composite CCNA.

    When they created the Intro exam I rather had they created an entry-level cert, as a decent alternative to the low-quality Network+ from CompTIA, which is pretty much what they did now but it is kinda odd that CCENT is basically the first half of the CCNA. Maybe there won't be a CCNA composite exam the next update, make the CCENT a prerequisite for the CCNA which then won't cover the same topics again. Maybe that's the goal and they just need to introduce it slowly to prevent it from being interpreted as a purely commercial move.

    Considering the nr of Cisco academies and other educational institutions that deliver Cisco certification courses it's not a matter of 'if' this is going to be a popular certification.
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    #8

    Default So what do I do now?

    Hey guys,
    I was planning on sitting the INTRO exam next week, I have a ICND training course on the 7/30-8/2 and the INTRO certification is recommended as a pre-requisite. Should i wait and get the new cert or just take the exam? If i passed the INTRO could i just put on my resume that i was a CCENT?
    Any advice would be great
    Nick
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  10. The Colosus of Clout Paul Boz's Avatar
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    #9
    I'm just curious what the motivation is behind this move. Even with the new exam requirements, a two test route doesn't really warrant multiple certificates. I mean sure, if the value of my CCNA goes up because it's no longer the "bottom of the barrel" Cisco certification that's fantastic, but I don't really see it as a very worthwhile decision, and ultimately I see it as a way for more people to put Cisco on their resume, thus overall cheapening the value of Cisco certifications.

    Quote Originally Posted by baldychoko
    Hey guys,
    I was planning on sitting the INTRO exam next week, I have a ICND training course on the 7/30-8/2 and the INTRO certification is recommended as a pre-requisite. Should i wait and get the new cert or just take the exam? If i passed the INTRO could i just put on my resume that i was a CCENT?
    Any advice would be great
    Nick
    Not unless you took the CCENT exam and were actually awarded a certificate.
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  11. Village Idiot dtlokee's Avatar
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    #10
    The way it was explained to me is that you will earn the CCENT if you choose the 2 exam or the composite exam path. I haven't seen anything else to verify this but that's what I was told, hopefully the webcast today will clarify this. Also Cisco is raising the prices of the exams, $125 for each of the ICND exams and $150 for the composite exam (640-802) I guess the professional level tests will be going up soon too.

    The point behind the CCENT is to get people who have little to no networking skills and get them to a point where they can unbox a Cisco device, put it in a rack, smack a basic configuration on it and troubleshoot problems along the way. I know a company that is short staffed when it comes to Cisco people (well networking people in general) they have 18,000 VoIP phones in a warehouse because they don't have anyone "qualified" to unbox them and put them on a desk, so all their future orders for more phones are on hold. I guess this is the market they are targeting.

    I can't wait until I see a job posting for CCENT with 3-5 years of experience.

    Let’s face it, Cisco certified people are one of their best methods to market and sell Cisco gear, without us to install it, Cisco can't sell it.
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  12. The Colosus of Clout Paul Boz's Avatar
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    #11
    I thought CCNAs were plentiful enough to fill this type of role. Is there any current documentation which explains the market demand for the various Cisco certifications?
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    #12
    Well, Todd Lammle seems to think the 2-way approach will be the way to go, he says the new exam will be, and i quote "extremely hard"...

    Here's an extract from his blog...

    This new entry-level certification has been dubbed Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician (CCENT).

    Why is this so important? Well, because the CCNA exam-especially the new CCNA announced today-is now extremely hard, that's why! So it's CCENT to the rescue. It gives unsuspecting network professionals the opportunity to take a much easier stepping stone-like approach to getting that all-important CCNA certification instead of trying to gulp all the information in a one week class, or by reading a book.

    Yes, it's true-the GlobalNet Training Bootcamp approach works really well for most people that have networking experience, but for those people trying to become network professionals with no prior experience whatsoever, diving straight into the sometimes overwhelming and unforgiving depths of the CCNA is a pretty formidable challenge! The CCNA course/exam just isn't the entry level program of days past, so the new CCENT certification is a terrific introduction-it's the answer for inexperienced people who want a much more user-friendly, (read, possible), way to break into the internetworking profession!
    Well, either he thinks it's really hard, or he's trying to sell GlobalNet training...

    However, he still recommends the one exam approach....and I agree as well, regardless of how hard the one exam gets...

    I always recommend the one test approach because, well, no one, including Cisco, has proved that the two-test approach is actually easier. So why go there? A really cool thing I like about the new CCNA Composite exam is that it covers all the new cutting edge stuff-no more ISDN! Here's a short list of the new technologies covered:

    • Secure Device Manager
    • Virtual Private Networks
    • IPv6 (my favorite!)
    • 2960 Switches
    • Cisco Network Assistant
    • Advanced EIGRP and OSPF
    • Introduction to Wireless networks
    • More security
    • Lot's of troubleshooting
    Should be a hoot!
    So even from Cisco and the experts, there's no clear cut advice, each individual still has to determine for themselves what suits them best, based on past and current knowledge...but i dont think getting the CCENT should be a something you want to shoot for...it's nice to have along the way, but hey, that's just my opinion...
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  14. Psychotron Member Megadeth4168's Avatar
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    #13
    Looks like I put my CCNA on the back burner for too long! I guess when I finally get around to my CCNA I will have different options to look at.... Too bad, I already have CCNA books for the current exam.
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  15. Village Idiot dtlokee's Avatar
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    #14
    but i dont think getting the CCENT should be a something you want to shoot for...it's nice to have along the way, but hey, that's just my opinion
    The same could be said for CCNA and CCNP if your goal is CCIE, it's all relative when compared to where you are starting out.

    Yes the exams are going to get more difficult, that's a fact. But that's nothing new, the CCNA was far easier 5 years ago and it keeps evolving. More and more topics keep leaking out of the Professional level topics into the CCNA.

    But what constitutes advanced EIGRP? Using a wildcard mask on a network command? Mismatched bandwidth statements causing SIA? Stub routing? Who knows? Compared to the current exam it will include more in depth study of topics, but hey, no more ISDN. Adding SDM to the exam will be interesting, I guess the market price of 2500's just went down. Like CCNP I would imagine they're going to try to configure the "harder" topics using SDM, I could see them asking about using SDM VPN wizard, don't think they would hit you with configuring crypto maps and all from the command prompt.

    As far as one exam vs 2 exams, I have been training for 10 years and have looked throughout that time and the two exam path has never been "easier" than the one exam path or the other way around. Many training providers will cram INTRO and ICND into a single class and that is why they recommend a single test path. If you take the INTRO course, study hard and practice on some sort of lab, you can pass the INTRO portion. Then move on to the ICND part. The same is true of the new ICND 1 and ICND 2, attack them one at a tiem or both at the same time.

    The topic changes are overdue, and it's not going to be as bad as everyone thinks.
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  16. Senior Member Pash's Avatar
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    #15
    They have taken ISDN out of the current CCNA criteria? Im really angry now, all that hard work i put into revising that....grrrrrrrr

    Anyway, that looks much more "futuristic" and well done to Cisco for employing a new attainable entry level cert. My question is, what will vendors such as Comptia make of this? This new CCENT will be on par with a lot of the N+ topics for example AND it will include some important Cisco "specifics" which makes it more industry friendly + it's a stepping stone to the starting goal of every networking professional.
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    #16
    Sounds like their are pluses and minus's to both
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  18. Johan Hiemstra Site Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Boz
    I thought CCNAs were plentiful enough to fill this type of role. Is there any current documentation which explains the market demand for the various Cisco certifications?
    Not sure exactly what your looking for, but the Cisco academy pages contain some relevant info, for example the IDC report: www.cisco.com/edu/emea/general/idc.shtml (does not include North and South America). I think it's more Cisco's initiative than an answer to what the industry wants though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pash
    Anyway, that looks much more "futuristic" and well done to Cisco for employing a new attainable entry level cert. My question is, what will vendors such as Comptia make of this? This new CCENT will be on par with a lot of the N+ topics for example AND it will include some important Cisco "specifics" which makes it more industry friendly + it's a stepping stone to the starting goal of every networking professional
    A common and valid question in the forums is whether one should go for the Network+ 'before' going for the CCNA. Imo the best reason to do that is, or 'was', the additional cert on a resume. Even though Network+ does cover some topics that aren't on the ICND1 (nor ICND2), considering the cost of CompTIA exams/certs, well, you can fill in those topics by reading my TechNotes if you really think you're missing out on knowledge when skipping Network+. Especially outside the US, CompTIA certifications often have very little value once you add a couple of Cisco or Microsoft certificaitons. You could skip Network+, and spend the money on the ICND1 instead, and still save money and time (for the ICND2) and still have 2 certs of which one is an entry level network technician cert.

    CCENT obviously doesn't have the same recognition Network+ has, yet, but if any employer asks what it is, an 'incomplete' answer similar to "it's like Network+, but from Cisco" is all it takes especially if the job entails 'Cisco networks'. I'm not against CompTIA or their certs, I think their certifications have a place and those who studied properly probably gained by pursueing them, but (after that disclaimer), I've been complaining about their low quality and almost amateuristic selection of exam objectives for years, and was kinda expecting (read: hoping) someone more capable (Cisco or CWNP even) would show them how it's done properly.

    There's plenty of information and details to justify the seperate certifications. My main problem with it is that they aren't really 'separate'. They could have created CCENT as a separate certification but then most people probably would have skipped it. As part of the CCNA they can market it more easily. I bet they'll split it off entirely in 2 or 3 years and that eventually there will even be more people CCENT certified than Network+. I'll be one of them, seems like a good opportunity to get my CCNA back.

    Now lets hope ISC2 will introduce an entry-level InfoSec cert...
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  19. Senior Member
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    #18
    I must say I like the idea.

    Correct me if I am wrong, but a CCNA is supposed to have 6 month exerience with Cisco routers and switches, right?

    It's been my experience that none of them have that. (like myself)

    With a new cert, that lets someone get their foot in the door, and THEN move on to CCNA. That would actually give a great deal more value to the CCNA.

    What ya think?
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    #19
    I do very little work with Cisco products, but it would be nice to have a cert that went along with what I do know. It looks like the CCENT would be a good fit for me.


    There is an article at certcities about the update and the CCENT. Take a look at this quote:

    According to Dunn, the revamped CCNA and the new CCENT are just the beginning. "You'll see even more option specializations, more entry-points, and something that starts to look at advanced skills in a different way over the next two years," she said.
    I'm interested in the "more entry-points" part. Hopefully, we will be seeing a CCSA, Cisco Certified Security Associate.
    Andy


    2014 Goals: 4 of 4 courses complete, 1 of 4 exams complete
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    #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Webmaster
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Boz
    I thought CCNAs were plentiful enough to fill this type of role. Is there any current documentation which explains the market demand for the various Cisco certifications?
    Not sure exactly what your looking for, but the Cisco academy pages contain some relevant info, for example the IDC report: www.cisco.com/edu/emea/general/idc.shtml (does not include North and South America). I think it's more Cisco's initiative than an answer to what the industry wants though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pash
    Anyway, that looks much more "futuristic" and well done to Cisco for employing a new attainable entry level cert. My question is, what will vendors such as Comptia make of this? This new CCENT will be on par with a lot of the N+ topics for example AND it will include some important Cisco "specifics" which makes it more industry friendly + it's a stepping stone to the starting goal of every networking professional
    A common and valid question in the forums is whether one should go for the Network+ 'before' going for the CCNA. Imo the best reason to do that is, or 'was', the additional cert on a resume. Even though Network+ does cover some topics that aren't on the ICND1 (nor ICND2), considering the cost of CompTIA exams/certs, well, you can fill in those topics by reading my TechNotes if you really think you're missing out on knowledge when skipping Network+. Especially outside the US, CompTIA certifications often have very little value once you add a couple of Cisco or Microsoft certificaitons. You could skip Network+, and spend the money on the ICND1 instead, and still save money and time (for the ICND2) and still have 2 certs of which one is an entry level network technician cert.

    CCENT obviously doesn't have the same recognition Network+ has, yet, but if any employer asks what it is, an 'incomplete' answer similar to "it's like Network+, but from Cisco" is all it takes especially if the job entails 'Cisco networks'. I'm not against CompTIA or their certs, I think their certifications have a place and those who studied properly probably gained by pursueing them, but (after that disclaimer), I've been complaining about their low quality and almost amateuristic selection of exam objectives for years, and was kinda expecting (read: hoping) someone more capable (Cisco or CWNP even) would show them how it's done properly.

    There's plenty of information and details to justify the seperate certifications. My main problem with it is that they aren't really 'separate'. They could have created CCENT as a separate certification but then most people probably would have skipped it. As part of the CCNA they can market it more easily. I bet they'll split it off entirely in 2 or 3 years and that eventually there will even be more people CCENT certified than Network+. I'll be one of them, seems like a good opportunity to get my CCNA back.

    Now lets hope ISC2 will introduce an entry-level InfoSec cert...
    This may be a very general question to your post but, do you think altogether this might eliminate the need for Network+? Especially for someone that is just starting to get the certs on their belt but have experience?
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  22. The Colosus of Clout Paul Boz's Avatar
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    #21
    Quote Originally Posted by cgrimaldo
    This may be a very general question to your post but, do you think altogether this might eliminate the need for Network+? Especially for someone that is just starting to get the certs on their belt but have experience?
    I don't know how to answer that. I've never seen an entry position in networking posted with a requirement of the network+ certification. Every intro level networking job I've ever seen had at least the CCNA. Perhaps the bar will be set lower and CCENT will be enough for many intro networking positions. The network+ cert seems to be a specialty cert to tack onto your A+, not a valid way of getting into networking.
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  23. Senior Member
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    #22
    I was planning on taking the CCNA 640-801 at the end of this summer. Should I wait?
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  24. Johan Hiemstra Site Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #23
    Quote Originally Posted by cgrimaldo
    This may be a very general question to your post but, do you think altogether this might eliminate the need for Network+? Especially for someone that is just starting to get the certs on their belt but have experience?
    I don't think it will come close to a point where Network+ will be 'eliminated'. Next to A+ it is CompTIA's most popular cert. There's another major difference between CompTIA and Cisco certifications, which is that CompTIA certs are for life. If you add more vendor certs, that difference is eventually just a minor difference, but those CompTIA certs can be good resume filler for those who are starting out. And if you use the proper study material (good books, CBTs, hands-on practice) they can function as a good intro.

    Another good reason to go for Network+ (and A+) is that they can be used, combined, as an elective for the MCSA.

    But, like I said in my previous post, those CompTIA certs are expensive. If the boss pays it's different of course, but imHo, those $200 are better spend on some Cisco equipment. A good theoretic foundation is important for even the most practical IT jobs but there's no better way of learning to become an entry level network 'technician' than practicing with some real equipment. The fact Cisco exams aren't vendor-neutral is not a major factor because they have the largest share in potential work environments. And Cisco technology includes standard and proprietary technology, so it's not like you'll be missing out on important topics (like how to hook up a MAC or Netware system to a network).

    If you already planned to go for Network+ or are already working on it, I wouldn't advice against finishing it. But in general, for those who have an MCSA/MCSE and/or plan to go for professional level cisco certs (CCNP/CCSP, etc) or beyond, I recommend seriously considering to spend your money and time on an entry level networking certifications only once (and getting a Cisco certification for passing half the CCNA and saving money and time to focus on the other, harder half).

    The thing is basically that you have to consider how it looks in a package of certifications. If you'd compare a resume with only CCENT to one with only Network+ 'now', the latter would probably be better simply because it's well-known. That will change very soon though. And again, if you spell out the name of the cert... well, let me put it this way: no '+' can beat the words 'Cisco Certified' in the eyes of an employer with a relevant environment.

    Quote Originally Posted by ajs1976
    I do very little work with Cisco products, but it would be nice to have a cert that went along with what I do know. It looks like the CCENT would be a good fit for me.
    I think there will be a lot of people who may not want to go all the way for the CCNA but still go for CCENT. Recertifying the latter will be a good reason to finish the CCNA.
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  25. Johan Hiemstra Site Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Rearden
    I was planning on taking the CCNA 640-801 at the end of this summer. Should I wait?
    The answer to this when an update is released, regardless of the certification, is almost always 'no'. It's usually best to not let update announcements interfere with short-term plans. (Could be different in case you the exam would cover a certain version your employer wants, e.g. with Microsoft certs). You still have until 11/6/07 to pass the 'current' exam, which is not a very short period regardless of how much you are currently prepared.

    Also, as others have mentioned, the differences are not 'that' huge, and they are mostly theory. You can always switch to the new exam.

    On a similar 'note':
    The following two will give you a good 'start' for the new exam objectives of the Explain and select the appropriate administrative tasks required for a WLAN section:
    http://www.techexams.net/technotes/n...tworking.shtml
    http://www.techexams.net/blogs/jdmur...-say-no-to-wep

    I will turn those into separate TechNotes for the ICND1 and ICND2 very soon. I also have some half-finished TechNotes for the SND 552 exam (for the CCSP) which happen to cover much of the same security topics as they added to the CCNA. Some of the info of my current SND TechNotes ( www.techexams.net/ccsp/SND_642-552.shtml ) also applies.
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  26. Senior Member
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    #25
    According to the CCNA Prep Center, under the |Overview| tab, under the "Featured Content" section of the CCNA Prep Center homepage, there is a "Just Announced: CCNA and CCENT Certification Overview" where you can click on the _Watch the Video_ link to watch a presentation about the new CCNA and CCENT certification programs. Based on the video, the prices for the new exams will be higher than the current exams.
    [list=1][*]Current CCNA track
    1. 640-821 INTRO = $100
    2. 640-811 ICND = $100
    3. 640-801 CCNA = $125
    [*]New CCNA track
    1. 640-822 ICND1 = $125
    2. 640-816 ICND2 = $125
    3. 640-802 CCNA = $150
    [/list:89b951add8]

    Source:
    1. Cisco Systems:CCNA Prep Center - Login - http://forums.cisco.com/eforum/servl...nter?page=main
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