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  1. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #26
    For 5/10

    Read Chp 8, need to writeup notes
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  3. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #27
    5/11

    At work now, instead of surfing the internet, I'm trying to practice my subnetting.
    Also still quiz and reviewing chp 2 and 3. I am still not at the point able to site all of this
    material ok.

    Chp 3, I'm still getting hung up on the unicast, broadcast and multicast.
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  4. Senior Member xenodamus's Avatar
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    #28
    Keep it up - I find it hard sometimes to read the same chapter several times but I always pick up on little things I didn't see before when I do.
    CISSP | CCNA:R&S/Security | MCSA 2003 | A+ S+ | VCP6-DTM | CCA-V CCP-V
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  5. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #29
    5/12
    -Quiz and reviewed Chp 2 and Chp 3 before work and during lunch break
    -While at work converted ip addresses to binary and also wrote out CIDR Table a few times
    -Wrote up notes on Chp 8 from Odom's Book

    Was also wondering:
    Do the access, core and distributions switches indicate these are those types?
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  6. Man of the People
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    #30
    don't quote me on this but i think for core layer switches, they are likely to be layer 3 switches, but that's not gospel, because you can have a layer 3 switch as an access layer switch if you wanted. A switch that can do layer 3 is called a multi-layer switch. You will learn more about that in CCNP I believe, because they cover MPLS and stuff like that.

    Multilayer switch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    There's no real difference, it just depends on how you design your network. Switches operate at layer 2 unless they are multilayer switches as mentioned before.

    Hierarchical internetworking model - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    that's basically a quick summary of the hierarchial model, basically core layer has the most powerful processing equipment, because it is the high speed backbone of the network. It also provides redundancy in case of a failure at the top of the network, which is pretty important in large networks.

    The distribution is the "smart" layer where all the routing and filtering happen.

    The access layer is the end devices on the network. If you look at wikipedia it will tell you that Layer 3 switches can be found on the access layer if they are so desired.

    So basically I hope that answers your question, you can find Layer 3 switches in the core, distribution, or access layers.
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  7. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Selfmade View Post
    don't quote me on this but i think for core layer switches, they are likely to be layer 3 switches, but that's not gospel, because you can have a layer 3 switch as an access layer switch if you wanted. A switch that can do layer 3 is called a multi-layer switch. You will learn more about that in CCNP I believe, because they cover MPLS and stuff like that.

    Multilayer switch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    There's no real difference, it just depends on how you design your network. Switches operate at layer 2 unless they are multilayer switches as mentioned before.

    Hierarchical internetworking model - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    that's basically a quick summary of the hierarchial model, basically core layer has the most powerful processing equipment, because it is the high speed backbone of the network. It also provides redundancy in case of a failure at the top of the network, which is pretty important in large networks.

    The distribution is the "smart" layer where all the routing and filtering happen.

    The access layer is the end devices on the network. If you look at wikipedia it will tell you that Layer 3 switches can be found on the access layer if they are so desired.

    So basically I hope that answers your question, you can find Layer 3 switches in the core, distribution, or access layers.

    Actually, I also have the Cisco CCNA book by Lammle and in the 1st chp (I need to start taking notes and doing quiz/review from this book too) he breaks down the different types of Cisco equipment: Access, Core and Distribution.

    Core Layer
    Core Layer is literally the core of the network. At the top of the hierarchy, the core layer is responsible for transporting large amounts of traffic both reliably and quickly.

    The core is likely to see large volumes of traffic, so spped and latency are driving
    concerns here.
    Distribution Layer
    Sometimes referred to as the workgroup layer and is the communication point between
    the access layer and the core. The primary functions of the distribution layer are to provide routing, filtering and WAN access and to determine how packets can access the core, if needed.

    The distribution layer is the place to implement policies for the network
    Access Layer
    The access layer control user and workgroup access to internetwork resources. The access layer is sometimes referred to as the desktop layer
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  8. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #32
    5/13
    -Quiz/review in the morning for chp2/chp3...stuff is starting to gell
    -While at work did a bunch of converting ip to binary, matter of fact, all day. Also wrote out
    CDIR a few times
    -Did more quiz/review for chp2/chp3 and chp4
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  9. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #33
    5/18

    Read and took notes of Chp 1 in Lammle's book.
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  10. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #34
    5/19

    Have read chp 1, 2 and 3 in Lammle's Book and need to take notes now.
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  11. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #35
    5/23

    Wrote up my notes for the following Odom chps: 9, 10 and 11. I am almost done with the book and only have 6 chapters left (I already have chp 12 written up, which is the subnetting chapter).

    I also fired up my Cisco Catalyst 2900 12 port switch today and spent some time learning some of the commands.

    I want to backup the IOS before getting too wild, so I'm reading up on that.

    Here is an example of some output:

    Code:
    C2900#show version
    Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
    IOS (tm) C2900XL Software (C2900XL-C3H2S-M), Version 12.0(5)WC9, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
    Copyright (c) 1986-2003 by cisco Systems, Inc.
    Compiled Fri 19-Sep-03 10:28 by antonino
    Image text-base: 0x00003000, data-base: 0x0034E434
    
    ROM: Bootstrap program is C2900XL boot loader
    
    C2900 uptime is 6 hours, 52 minutes
    System returned to ROM by power-on
    System image file is "flash:c2900xl-c3h2s-mz.120-5.WC9.bin"
    
    
    cisco WS-C2912-XL (PowerPC403GA) processor (revision 0x11) with 8192K/1024K bytes of memory.
    Processor board ID FAB0402U198, with hardware revision 0x01
    Last reset from power-on
    
    Processor is running Enterprise Edition Software
    Cluster command switch capable
    Cluster member switch capable
    12 FastEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interface(s)
    
    32K bytes of flash-simulated non-volatile configuration memory.
    Base ethernet MAC Address: 00:B0:64:9B:77:C0
    Motherboard assembly number: 73-3397-07
    Power supply part number: 34-0834-01
    Motherboard serial number: FAB04016434
    Power supply serial number: DAB03433T1P
    Model revision number: A0
    Model number: WS-C2912-XL-EN
    System serial number: FAB0402U198
    Configuration register is 0xF
    One of the questions that I have is, can I just power this sucker up? I am using Minicom from my Linux box and I had attached the serial to rj-45 connector and then powered it on and then I connected via minicom.

    Once I got connected, it was already at the c2900> prompt.

    Also is there a correct way to shut this switch down without screwing it up?
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  12. Senior Member alan2308's Avatar
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    #36
    Quote Originally Posted by JockVSJock View Post
    Also is there a correct way to shut this switch down without screwing it up?
    Nope. There's no switch and no software shutdown procedure. Just cut power.
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  13. Senior Member chmorin's Avatar
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    #37
    Quote Originally Posted by alan2308 View Post
    Nope. There's no switch and no software shutdown procedure. Just cut power.
    I'd save first, unless you want to be like me a configure a new switch and bring it in to install and forgot you didn't write it before you unplugged it from your desk.
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  14. Senior Member alan2308's Avatar
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    #38
    Quote Originally Posted by chmorin View Post
    I'd save first, unless you want to be like me a configure a new switch and bring it in to install and forgot you didn't write it before you unplugged it from your desk.
    Very good point. I was thinking from a lab perspective where I don't normally carry a config forward.
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  15. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #39
    Quote Originally Posted by chmorin View Post
    I'd save first, unless you want to be like me a configure a new switch and bring it in to install and forgot you didn't write it before you unplugged it from your desk.

    I haven't made any changes...yet...However my first goal is to copy down my IOS from all of my switches/routers to my Linux box and tar them up in case I need them.

    Not sure how to save on a Cisco router/switch, do tell!
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  16. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #40
    5/24

    For today:
    -writeup notes for Chp 11 & 13 today. For some reason I did chp 13 first and then realized that I missed chp 11....oh well...

    -played around with minicom and that Cisco Switch. I feel another addiction coming on, like when I first started to learn Linux, 10 years ago

    -also I turned minicom on first and then started up the Cisco Switch and was able to watch the POST/Boot screen

    URLs for Minicom configs:

    Installing Minicom to connect to Cisco router using console cable. | David Sudjiman

    Howto Setup advanced TFTP server in Ubuntu|Ubuntu Geek
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    #41

    Default JB Weld for faceplate repair!

    I know the faceplates can be a bummer- they look sloppy and ugly if missing or broken. The repair depends on what's broken and where. Do you have any pieces left? If so, please post them- it will help. Take off the metal top cover like the link repair shows. You can try to superglue the original tab "ear" back together then tease it back into the mounting hole. Hot glue works pretty well also. You have to get the assembled faceplate back onto the router! Support it with lots of duct tape if you have to when it's done.

    Then pack some JB Weld through the hole onto the faceplate- try to cover as much surface area of the faceplate as you can. At this point, your pushing through the chassis, back towards the faceplate. Then JB Weld what pokes through into the chassis, making sure you smoosh the eariler putty deposits and the new deposits together. You're building up the JB Weld, so smooth some around the ear/tab/thingy back through to the mounting base of the face place. If you can get enough surface contact on all the surfaces, believe me, it WON'T come off. Period.

    What i'm trying to explain is you should see a smooth cone of grey putty that has a root in the faceplate, extends through the front frame and moulds around the mounting tab. If your mounting tab has any close contact to the metal frame of the router, that's perfect- build up a thin layer from the tab to the metal frame. About 1/8 inch on the tab and 1/4 inch on the metal will be perfect, and more perfect if you can get TWO sides of the tab, but all is for naught if you can't get the putty around the root of the tab! That's the weak spot- your repair will fail if the tab falls off the faceplate.

    Make this a two stage repair if you have to- tab to faceplate on day 1, then an overnight cure (it will warm as it "kicks" or starts to harden.) Then on day 2 mount the faceplate and glob it together to the frame.

    I wish I could get electrons to flow like this...
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  18. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #42
    5/25

    For today
    -notes cleanup for Chp 8, 11 and 13

    My goal for the weekend is to have all of my notes for the Cisco ICND Book done.
    Also want to give hostname and backup all IOS of my Cisco routers/switches.
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  19. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #43
    5/26

    Read and took notes for Chp 14 in Odom's book.
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  20. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #44
    5/31

    So I've slacked a bit, I haven't done any studying for a few days. These are the 1st days off I've had since the Christmas holiday.

    I've tried to copy down the Cisco ios from my 2900 Switch to either my Linux box or my Windows Laptop and not able to do it. I did d/l a TFTP client on the Windows 7 Laptop, and still wasn't able to copy it down using

    Code:
    copy tftp flash
    I was able to assign the Switch an ip address and was able to ping it from the laptop, however wasn't able to ping from the Switch to the laptop.

    I also wasn't able to assign the Switch a loopaback address, even though I was in exec mode

    Code:
    int loopback 0
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  21. Senior Member alan2308's Avatar
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    #45
    You have the parameters backwards. Its "copy source destination" so you want copy flash tftp to backup the IOS to a PC.


    And there are no loopback interfaces on a layer 2 switch. They don't really serve any purpose at layer 2. For one thing, the only IP address a layer 2 switch can have is on the interface of it's management VLAN.
    Last edited by alan2308; 05-31-2010 at 09:55 PM.
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  22. Censorship is Un-American JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #46
    5/31

    So far today, I have done the following:
    -wrote up notes for Chp 1 & 2 for Lammle. I'm also working on chp 3 as I write this up.

    Here is another question I have, with these two 2900 series switches, how in the hell do they hook up to say a router. I don't see an uplink port and not sure how this is done.
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  23. Skilled Hamburglar Monkerz's Avatar
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    #47
    Quote Originally Posted by JockVSJock View Post
    Here is another question I have, with these two 2900 series switches, how in the hell do they hook up to say a router. I don't see an uplink port and not sure how this is done.
    You can configure any of the ports as an uplink to the router. I usually go with the highest numbered port.
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  24. JSK
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    #48
    Don't the 2500 routers require a transceiver to allow you to connect Ethernet?
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  25. Senior Member alan2308's Avatar
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    #49
    Quote Originally Posted by JSK View Post
    Don't the 2500 routers require a transceiver to allow you to connect Ethernet?
    The 2524 has a RJ-45, all of the rest of the Ethernet models (Remember, the 2500 series also had Token Ring models) had an AUI port or two.
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  26. Senior Member alan2308's Avatar
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    #50
    Quote Originally Posted by JockVSJock View Post
    Here is another question I have, with these two 2900 series switches, how in the hell do they hook up to say a router. I don't see an uplink port and not sure how this is done.
    There's really nothing special about the uplink port(s) on a switch other than they're faster than the other ports in the switch (24 10/100Mbps ports vs 2 Gigabit ports). The 2900's are the bottom feeders of the 2900 series, so they have none. But there's nothing stopping you from connecting all 24 ports to 24 different routers if you so desire. There's also nothing stopping you from from connecting an uplink port to a server or high end workstation.
    Last edited by alan2308; 06-01-2010 at 03:43 AM. Reason: grammar
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