+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. Member HardDisk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    57

    Certifications
    CCNA, A+, Net+, Security+, MCP, MCTS
    #1

    Default Interface range command

    Since time management is critical to passing a cisco exam how should one prepare to use the "Interface range" command.

    It seems this command is specific to which device type/model/version you are using. I would hate to spend five minutes or more fussing with this command.

    Switch(config)# interface range fastEthernet 0/1 - 3

    Switch(config)# interface range fastEthernet 0/1 - fastEthernet 0/3

    Your thoughts please.
    Reply With Quote Quote  


  2. Login/register to remove this advertisement.
  3. Senior Member alan2308's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    1,622

    Certifications
    CCNA, CCNA Sec, MCITP:SA
    #2
    IIRC, the CCNA test is based on the 2960 switch, which does support interface range.

    interface range FastEthernet0/1 - 15

    interface range FastEthernet0/1 , 0/15
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. Member HardDisk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    57

    Certifications
    CCNA, A+, Net+, Security+, MCP, MCTS
    #3
    Good information to know. thanks'
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. Junior Member Registered Member aR15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Washington, D.C.
    Posts
    9

    Certifications
    CCNP, CCVP, N+, S+
    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by alan2308 View Post
    IIRC, the CCNA test is based on the 2960 switch, which does support interface range.

    interface range FastEthernet0/1 - 15

    interface range FastEthernet0/1 , 0/15


    alan made a good point in the second part of his example for you as well.

    if you have multiple ports (typically 5 separated ports are allowed at a time) that don't fall within a desired range, the comma (,) followed by the next port (i.e.: interface range fa0/1 - 3 , fa0/5 , fa0/6 - 9) allows you to jump around ports without having to go line by line or messing up your flow of range commands.

    kudos to alan for bringing up this command tip once again.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Senior Member alan2308's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Posts
    1,622

    Certifications
    CCNA, CCNA Sec, MCITP:SA
    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by aR15 View Post
    alan made a good point in the second part of his example for you as well.

    if you have multiple ports (typically 5 separated ports are allowed at a time) that don't fall within a desired range, the comma (,) followed by the next port (i.e.: interface range fa0/1 - 3 , fa0/5 , fa0/6 - 9) allows you to jump around ports without having to go line by line or messing up your flow of range commands.

    kudos to alan for bringing up this command tip once again.
    Just keep in mind that the comma doesn't work on every switch. It didn't work on the 2950's that I tried, but it did work on the 2960's. I brought it up since the CCNA is based on the 2960, but YMMV at home.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    93
    #6
    Good job guys all of the above is very useful!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread

Social Networking & Bookmarks