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Thread: CCNA Thread

  1. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #1

    Default CCNA Thread

    Well, I figured if I started writing about my studies each night I would hold my self more accountable. My goal is to crush the CCENT in the next two months and begin on ICND2 (CCNA).

    My girl actually slept for more than 3 hours last night Hopefully that is a good sign and I can begin to put in some serious study time.

    Subnetting has for some reason not fully sunk in yet. Tonight I'm going reread Todd Lammle's chapters on Subnetting and than Chris Bryant's sections.

    Back to the books....

    Oh, and I saw on Amazon that Todd Lammle's latest CCNA book is to come out on the 5th. Do you think it's worth getting this or just save ten bucks and get the older one?

    edit: Spent an hour on the phone this evening talking to a friend in Michigan. I think he definitely helped me get a better idea of the implementation of subnetting.
    Last edited by veritas_libertas; 03-23-2011 at 10:36 PM.
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  3. Network Engineer CodeBlox's Avatar
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    #2
    This is what I've used for CCNA studies and it's great! You get both books for ICND1 AND ICND2 in this package for $35.00 new. It's Wendel Odoms.

    http://www.amazon.com/Official-Certi...0756532&sr=8-1
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  4. Senior Member alan2308's Avatar
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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by veritas_libertas View Post
    Oh, and I saw on Amazon that Todd Lammle's latest CCNA book is to come out on the 5th. Do you think it's worth getting this or just save ten bucks and get the older one?
    There hasn't been any changes to the exam since the previous edition was released, so I can't imagine there would be that much difference. Typos, better clarification, etc.

    How bad do you need the $10?
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  5. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by alan2308 View Post
    There hasn't been any changes to the exam since the previous edition was released, so I can't imagine there would be that much difference. Typos, better clarification, etc.

    How bad do you need the $10?
    Enough to not buy the new book
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  6. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #5
    Achieved zero study time yesterday night. Work project kept me late and my baby daughter was having a crying spell.
    Last edited by veritas_libertas; 03-23-2011 at 11:08 PM.
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by veritas_libertas View Post
    Achieved zero study time yesterday night. Work project kept me late and my baby daughter was having a crying spell.
    When are you taking the ICND1? According to your signature, you're doing the 2 part route. I also notice that you're studying for ICND2/Security however. I assume you're finished your ICND1 studies?
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  8. Senior Member cyberguypr's Avatar
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by veritas_libertas View Post
    Subnetting has for some reason not fully sunk in yet. Tonight I'm going reread Todd Lammle's chapters on Subnetting and than Chris Bryant's sections.
    Don't forget this thread. IT made my subnetting ridiculously simple.
    Subnetting Made Easy
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  9. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by cyberguypr View Post
    Don't forget this thread. IT made my subnetting ridiculously simple.
    Subnetting Made Easy
    Agree, but it doesn't cover certain topics like how many hosts or subnets. The only way I can find to attack those questions is good old binary. Am I wrong?
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  10. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by okplaya View Post
    When are you taking the ICND1? According to your signature, you're doing the 2 part route. I also notice that you're studying for ICND2/Security however. I assume you're finished your ICND1 studies?
    I wish

    No that path is my goal for this year which I need to speed up with I want to do the SSCP in the first quarter of 2012.
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  11. Network Engineer CodeBlox's Avatar
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    #10
    Host per subnet is easy, (2^x) - 2 where 'x' equals the number of host bits.

    Say you needed 45 host per subnet. You would need 6 host bits because 2^6 = 64. You can't use 2^5 because thats only 32. Assuming class C, 6 host bits yields a mask of /26. Each subnet would support 62 host. With that mask in class C, there are 4 subnets available since you have 2 subnet bits which would be 2^2=4.
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by veritas_libertas View Post
    Agree, but it doesn't cover certain topics like how many hosts or subnets. The only way I can find to attack those questions is good old binary. Am I wrong?
    What part of how many hosts and subnets are you getting confused with?

    Remember that you will never ever touch the network bits (Class A, B, C) the rest are host bits.

    Count from left to right the number of subnet bits by the powers of 2 and that will tell you how many subnets you have. Count from right to left the number of 0 bits to the power of two and subtract 2 and you will have your number of hosts. 2,4,8,16,32,64,128,256,512,1024,2048, etc
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  13. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #12
    Oh I know how to do that guys. I'm just saying that SubnettingEasy doesn't answer every subnetting question.
    Last edited by veritas_libertas; 03-24-2011 at 02:39 AM.
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  14. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #13
    Question for you subnetting geniuses (I hope to be one someday ,) say I have this kind of subnetting scheme going:



    Obviously the space between 128.200.32 and 128.200.64 will be a range of IPs but what happens with the fourth octet??? Are we going with a range like this:

    128.200.32.1 - 128.200.64.0 ? In other words an IP address like 128.200.33.40 would be a valid IP address in that range?
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    #14
    Each column there is its own subnet. So you can't include addresses with x.x.64 with addresses from x.x.32. The last possible address for the network 128.200.32.0 would be 128.200.63.255 - which is the broadcast address. The last possible address a host could use would be 128.200.63.254

    Question for you - What is the network mask?
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  16. Senior Member mattlee09's Avatar
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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by veritas_libertas View Post
    Obviously the space between 128.200.32 and 128.200.64 will be a range of IPs but what happens with the fourth octet??? Are we going with a range like this:

    128.200.32.1 - 128.200.64.0 ? In other words an IP address like 128.200.33.40 would be a valid IP address in that range?
    You were almost there. I think you understood that 128.200.32.0 was the network address, because you started with 128.200.32.1 as the first valid host. It's the same way with the last address. 128.200.64.0 is actually the start of the next range, 128.200.64.0-128.200.96.0.

    So the address right before it, 128.200.63.255, is the broadcast address. The 2nd address before it, 128.200.63.254, is the last valid host address. So you have:
    Network address - 128.200.32.0
    First host address - 128.200.32.1
    Last host address - 128.200.63.254
    Broadcast address - 128.200.63.255

    Note that an addresses like 128.200.41.255 are valid host addresses now.
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  17. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by mattlee09 View Post
    You were almost there. I think you understood that 128.200.32.0 was the network address, because you started with 128.200.32.1 as the first valid host. It's the same way with the last address. 128.200.64.0 is actually the start of the next range, 128.200.64.0-128.200.96.0.

    So the address right before it, 128.200.63.255, is the broadcast address. The 2nd address before it, 128.200.63.254, is the last valid host address. So you have:
    Network address - 128.200.32.0
    First host address - 128.200.32.1
    Last host address - 128.200.63.254
    Broadcast address - 128.200.63.255

    Note that an addresses like 128.200.41.255 are valid host addresses now.
    Thanks! That was bugging me as I watch the Odom video. I don't really have any on the job experience with Cisco so I'm learning it as I go along.

    Off subject: I went through DFW airport on my way to Irving, TX and that is one VERY big airport. I looked it up on Google Maps and I'm convinced the airport is bigger than the city I live in...
    Last edited by veritas_libertas; 03-24-2011 at 04:30 AM.
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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by veritas_libertas View Post
    Off subject: I went through DFW airport on my way to Irving, TX and that is one VERY big airport. I looked it up on Google Maps and I'm convinced the airport is bigger than the city I live in...
    What they say about everything in Texas is true...

    But yeah, for example, Manhattan fits inside DFW airport. (Manhattan ~23 sm, DFW airport ~30 sm). Actually Denver airport is even bigger than DFW airport.

    When you're going back through make sure you take some time and hit terminal D.

    MS
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  19. Senior Member mattlee09's Avatar
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    #18
    Haha, yeah. I've been in it briefly only a few times to pick up relatives and whatnot.

    Veritas - You might check out Jeremy Cioara's subnetting example doc. Be careful not to learn a new method completely, or get them mixed up, but it might help put some things together. I technically learned Odom's method, but watched the CBT Nuggets after reading the ICND1 press book, so also got a bit of Cioara's I think.

    https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/se...20Examples.pdf
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  20. Network Engineer CodeBlox's Avatar
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    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by veritas_libertas View Post
    Question for you subnetting geniuses (I hope to be one someday ,) say I have this kind of subnetting scheme going:



    Obviously the space between 128.200.32 and 128.200.64 will be a range of IPs but what happens with the fourth octet??? Are we going with a range like this:

    128.200.32.1 - 128.200.64.0 ? In other words an IP address like 128.200.33.40 would be a valid IP address in that range?
    I'd like to make a little comment using your address space as an example: Don't let IP addresses like "128.200.40.0" confuse you. That is in the 128.200.32.0 /19 network and is not a subnet in the case of the /19

    I say that because when I learned how to subnet, something like that confused me. Here is another valid IP address: 10.3.0.0 /14. With a mask of 255.252.0.0 that is an IP address and could be assigned to a host
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    #20
    I was having a bit of trouble with subnetting, but after reading Todd's chapter in the CCNA book, it all makes sense now - that's what I get for looking at MS subnetting
    I just wrote out all the examples and would change them slightly until it just clicked. Now I can do a lot in my head, which I've heard is essential for the exam.
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  22. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #21
    Read through some more subnetting stuff yesterday and only got more confused

    Today: Started reading Chris Bryant's CCNA material and now it's beginning to really sink in. You might say a light-bulb lit up. Well, if it weren't for subnetting I think I could nail this exam in another week. I want to be dead certain I know subnetting so I don't waste money on an exam. Work will reimburse it if I pass, so I like the idea of getting my money back
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    What's up? Any updates?
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  24. "Too many routers"? Heh. darkerz's Avatar
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    #23
    I had a dream about subnetting last night.

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  25. Senior Member alan2308's Avatar
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    #24
    Quote Originally Posted by darkerz View Post
    I had a dream about subnetting last night.

    That's just the first of many.
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  26. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by darkerz View Post
    I had a dream about subnetting last night.

    You and me both.

    I'm currently looking over more subnetting material and trying to soak it in. I'm going to register for a test date tomorrow and hope that I can soak in by practice what I need before the exam.

    Back to the books...
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