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  1. Senior Member Node Man's Avatar
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    #1

    Default PC to Router - Straight Thru or Crossover?

    Hi Everybody,
    I think i see conflicting answers in practice tests. Does a PC to Router need to be a Straight Thru or Cross Over cable, not for consoling in (roll over). Just general connectivity.

    Thanks
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  3. The Awesome
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    #2
    crossover cable should be the answer on a test. in reality, i assume it would autosense and be fine with a straight through
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  4. Senior Member iamme4eva's Avatar
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    #3
    I think of it like this - a typical network connection is PC -> Switch -> Router. These are all straight through connections.

    Anything else would be a crossover - PC -> Router, or any like devices (switch -> switch, PC -> PC, router -> router, etc).

    Like fivedollarcouch says though, in real life most devices are auto sensing so it's a bit of an outdated concept - still know it for the exam though!
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  5. Happiness is !!!!! MAC_Addy's Avatar
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    #4
    When studying use this theory - like devices use cross-over. For example, a like device would be router to router, switch to switch, PC to PC. Unlike devices use straight-thru. Example, unlike devices would be router to PC, switch to router, switch to PC.
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  6. Senior Member Node Man's Avatar
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    #5
    one tricky point is hubs and switches. they are considered alike and require a cross over cable (i think). do bridges and switches need cross over? i think they are similar.
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  7. Member Iceman25k's Avatar
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Node Man View Post
    one tricky point is hubs and switches. they are considered alike and require a cross over cable (i think). do bridges and switches need cross over? i think they are similar.
    A switch is nothing more than a multiport bridge, so yes you would have to use a crossover cable to connect them.
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  8. Pancakes and Lasagna kurosaki00's Avatar
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    #7
    PC and Router uses the same cables/pins to send and receive information, therefor it needs to be "flipped" so no collisions occur
    transit ----> X <----transit
    Thus, It needs to be a cross over


    (not exactly router+pc, just to show TX and RX pins)
    TX = send
    RX = receive
    meh
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  9. Senior Member draught's Avatar
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    #8
    I was messing with packet tracer the other day and I just noticed that a router to PC connection used a crossover cable. I always thought that unlike devices use straight-thru and same/similar devices use crossover but I guess router to PC is the exception to that rule. Here's a quick example: Crossover are the dashed lines. Straight-thru is straight.

    Last edited by draught; 01-28-2013 at 09:04 AM.
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  10. Senior Member iamme4eva's Avatar
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by MAC_Addy View Post
    When studying use this theory - like devices use cross-over. For example, a like device would be router to router, switch to switch, PC to PC. Unlike devices use straight-thru. Example, unlike devices would be router to PC, switch to router, switch to PC.
    MAC_Addy, that's slightly incorrect. A PC to Router is a crossover.

    For the purposes of cabling, switches, hubs, bridges and repeaters can all be classed as the same device - that is, any connections between those will use a crossover.
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  11. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by iamme4eva View Post
    I think of it like this - a typical network connection is PC -> Switch -> Router. These are all straight through connections.

    Anything else would be a crossover - PC -> Router, or any like devices (switch -> switch, PC -> PC, router -> router, etc).

    Like fivedollarcouch says though, in real life most devices are auto sensing so it's a bit of an outdated concept - still know it for the exam though!

    Just joined to say BRILLIANT!!!! Thank you!!!! This has been plaguing me forever and this is by far the easiest way to remember!

    Thank y ou!
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  12. Member
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    #11
    I agree, that's a really handy way of thinking about it!
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