+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 25 of 28
  1. What The?! Fulcrum45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    476

    Certifications
    CCNA: R&S, Security+, Network+, FCNSA, MTA 98-365
    #1

    Default CCNP Worth Pursuing with Little Cisco/ NOC Experience?

    CCNP Worth Pursuing with Little Cisco/ NOC Experience?


    I'm trying to consider just how far I want to wade into the Cisco waters here. I love networking but frankly I don't do much of it day to day. I could make the argument that I've done CCNA level stuff around work but nothing really in depth. Since I rarely touch a Cisco device is it worth it for me to start working for my CCNP or should I look to get my hands on more experience first?
    Last edited by Fulcrum45; 04-12-2017 at 02:40 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS -->
  3. Senior Member shortstop20's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    136

    Certifications
    CCNA R&S
    #2
    Get more hands on experience, I would not at all recommend a CCNP for someone who isn't touching Cisco stuff everyday.
    Studying CCNP Route.

    CCNP Switch passed, 12/10/2015
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. Cisco R00t Clan Member NOC-Ninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    R00t
    Posts
    1,332

    Certifications
    CCIE-Wireless, CCIE-RS (written), CCNP-Wireless, CCNP, CCNA-Wireless, CCNA-Security, CCNA, CEH, CHFI
    #3
    Do what you want to do.
    If you dont have experience then build a lab. Buy those switches and routers to get exposed to it. Install gns3 in your laptop.

    Personally, I would concentrate on things that I am being exposed everyday. Lets say you are systems, get MS, redhat, or VM certs... Same if you are going for networks.
    MSISA
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    436

    Certifications
    MS IT, BS IT, CCIE R&S, CCNP, CCDP, CISSP, Sec+, VCA6-DCV, VCA6-NV
    #4
    Technical skills are perishable. If you don't work with it you will end up wasting the time you spent studying.

    Unless you are planning to work at an organization that uses Cisco after completing your cert and study efforts, I don't think you should do it.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. What The?! Fulcrum45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    476

    Certifications
    CCNA: R&S, Security+, Network+, FCNSA, MTA 98-365
    #5
    I appreciate the insight, gang. I had a feeling this might be the case. I'm immensely interested in going further but I'm thinking all the time, money and effort to get this cert just to ultimately become a paper CCNP isn't worth it.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    849

    Certifications
    CCNP: R&S, CCDA, CCNA: Security, CCNA: R&S, MTA: Networking Fundamentals, Security+, Network+, Linux+, A+, Project+
    #6
    Most CCNP level stuff doesn't make sense until you're in the field honestly.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    King City, CA
    Posts
    380

    Certifications
    A+, Network+, Security+ce, Server+, Project+, MCSA Server 2008, CCENT, CCNA R&S, CEHv8, CHFIv8, CCNA Security
    #7
    I am definitely going for CCNP after I finish my CCDA (hopefully this year). Problem is that I don't currently have employment on the networking side. My position is responsible for the server side. My study focus has been networking, but my actual experience is more servers. There's my catch-22. I don't want to be a paper CCNP either, but I figure I need to do something to prove myself if I want to get the networking job without starting at the bottom. Financially, I just can't afford to take a lower-paying job than what I already have.

    NOTE: Not trying to hijack this thread.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  9. Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    849

    Certifications
    CCNP: R&S, CCDA, CCNA: Security, CCNA: R&S, MTA: Networking Fundamentals, Security+, Network+, Linux+, A+, Project+
    #8
    The biggest problem without having experience and getting the CCNP, is that you might not comprehend why certain things are done. If we just use a simple thing like redistribution of routing protocols, you may be left wondering why would you ever use different routing protocols to begin with, and when this may come into play. An easy example I could give is having a primary and backup circuit at a branch office. One uses BGP, the other OSPF. BGP is administratively preferred and thus always used, and it's a classic case of how two routing protocols may come into use. The LAN uses EIGRP too, so both routing protocols need to be redistributed into it.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  10. What The?! Fulcrum45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    476

    Certifications
    CCNA: R&S, Security+, Network+, FCNSA, MTA 98-365
    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by PCTechLinc View Post
    I am definitely going for CCNP after I finish my CCDA (hopefully this year). Problem is that I don't currently have employment on the networking side. My position is responsible for the server side. My study focus has been networking, but my actual experience is more servers. There's my catch-22. I don't want to be a paper CCNP either, but I figure I need to do something to prove myself if I want to get the networking job without starting at the bottom. Financially, I just can't afford to take a lower-paying job than what I already have.

    NOTE: Not trying to hijack this thread.
    I'm in the same boat as you. Regardless of what my job title says (currently it's 'Network Administrator') I'm still just a Sys Admin/ Service Desk Admin with network responsibilities as projects (or problems) arise. I find servers boring and would love a career in networking but an entry level job wont keep the family fed. The best I can think to do is try to finish my MCSA and look towards a CCNA: Security cert later on.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  11. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    861

    Certifications
    CCNP
    #10
    CCNP:RS is, arguably, an entry level certification, and it is part of the Cisco Net Academy program (well, technically the classes use the CCNP books - you don't take the actual CCNP exams). I don't see why you would need very specific real life experience to understand the material.
    Last edited by fredrikjj; 04-12-2017 at 06:17 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  12. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    436

    Certifications
    MS IT, BS IT, CCIE R&S, CCNP, CCDP, CISSP, Sec+, VCA6-DCV, VCA6-NV
    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by fredrikjj View Post
    CCNP:RS is, arguably, an entry level certification, and it is part of the Cisco Net Academy program (well, technically the classes use the CCNP books - you don't take the actual CCNP exams). I don't see why you would need very specific real life experience to understand the material.
    The P stands for professional. CCENT/CCNA are entry level.

    At the CCNP level you should be able to build fairly complex R&S networks with full optimizations and little guidance.

    A paper CCNP without full time, real world experience is why certifications get flak.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  13. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    861

    Certifications
    CCNP
    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by tunerX View Post
    The P stands for professional. CCENT/CCNA are entry level.

    At the CCNP level you should be able to build fairly complex R&S networks with full optimizations and little guidance.

    A paper CCNP without full time, real world experience is why certifications get flak.
    The P might stand for professional, but what matters is the content. CCNP has basic STP, vlans, OSPF, EIGRP, a little bit of BGP, etc. You don't need to be a "professional" to understand those things. It's also an implementation focused exam, not a design exam. It will teach you how some protocols work, but not how to use them in an optimal way.

    PS.
    Whether it makes sense from a career stand point is not what I'm talking about btw. I'm just saying that the material is not harder than college classes that young adults study and pass all the time.
    Last edited by fredrikjj; 04-12-2017 at 06:46 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  14. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    861

    Certifications
    CCNP
    #13
    I mean, it's totally normal everywhere else to study things beyond what your current capabilties are. For example, when you are getting a software degree or something along those lines, you might, for training purposes, implement compilers and filesystems and all kinds of stuff that you would not be tasked with as a fresh graduate. However, implementing those things probably makes you a better developer. It seems universal to me that students are given tasks in school that are harder than the entry level tasks that they are expected to work on when they get their first job. Why wouldn't the same logic apply to networking?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  15. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    436

    Certifications
    MS IT, BS IT, CCIE R&S, CCNP, CCDP, CISSP, Sec+, VCA6-DCV, VCA6-NV
    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by fredrikjj View Post
    The P might stand for professional, but what matters is the content. CCNP has basic STP, vlans, OSPF, EIGRP, a little bit of BGP, etc. You don't need to be a "professional" to understand those things. It's also an implementation focused exam, not a design exam. It will teach you how some protocols work, but not how to use them in an optimal way.

    PS.
    Whether it makes sense from a career stand point is not what I'm talking about btw. I'm just saying that the material is not harder than college classes that young adults study and pass all the time.
    The content isn't entry level content.

    It's nice that you think that Cisco's professional level certs are basic entry level. We can chalk that up to braggadocio.
    Last edited by tunerX; 04-12-2017 at 07:31 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  16. Senior Member shortstop20's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    136

    Certifications
    CCNA R&S
    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by fredrikjj View Post
    The P might stand for professional, but what matters is the content. CCNP has basic STP, vlans, OSPF, EIGRP, a little bit of BGP, etc. You don't need to be a "professional" to understand those things. It's also an implementation focused exam, not a design exam. It will teach you how some protocols work, but not how to use them in an optimal way.

    PS.
    Whether it makes sense from a career stand point is not what I'm talking about btw. I'm just saying that the material is not harder than college classes that young adults study and pass all the time.
    The content on STP, OSPF and EIGRP within CCNP is certainly not "basic".
    Studying CCNP Route.

    CCNP Switch passed, 12/10/2015
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  17. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    De' Nile..
    Posts
    797

    Certifications
    "I eat SubNets like You for breakfast..."
    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Fulcrum45 View Post
    I'm in the same boat as you. Regardless of what my job title says (currently it's 'Network Administrator') I'm still just a Sys Admin/ Service Desk Admin with network responsibilities as projects (or problems) arise. I find servers boring and would love a career in networking but an entry level job wont keep the family fed. The best I can think to do is try to finish my MCSA and look towards a CCNA: Security cert later on.
    Best way to learn... is to be surrounded by people who are More Knowledgeable than yourself :]

    How much are you making right now?
    Maybe you can land at a NOC somewhere?

    Or, move to a company large enough to move-around later?


    I walked away from my sysadmin job last year too.
    Took the summer off.
    Was lucky enough to land a level-1 Noc gig.

    Took a paycut;
    now i'm working with Juniper most of the day; but also get a chance to touch Palo ALto, IOS routers, Layer 3 switches, and learning about BGP, VRFs, and VPNs, etc.
    (i havent even gotten to Wireshark, NX-OS f5 LTM yet!)

    The lesser-pay sucks;
    the grunt-work sucks;
    but boy am i learning real stuff.

    With a little luck, I will be getting my intro f5 cert; and also the Palo Alto ACE.
    Next year, i will start my ccnp journey.


    If you want to make a Change.... you gotta be the change.
    (yes, easier said than done)
    Last edited by volfkhat; 04-13-2017 at 02:00 AM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  18. What The?! Fulcrum45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    476

    Certifications
    CCNA: R&S, Security+, Network+, FCNSA, MTA 98-365
    #17
    Appreciate the insight, gang. I'm not making a crazy salary so it's not impossible to think I could take a minor pay cut to get the ball rolling. OR I could do another gig overseas where they can care less if you have experience and just want the certs. I know that's not ideal but it would be a way out of server purgatory
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  19. Senior Member dontstop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    515

    Certifications
    CompTIA IT Fundamentals, CCENT, CCNA:R&S, BInfoTech
    #18
    My only worry about NOC work would be making sure the org. you work for is at the right size/scale that they're willing to grow their NOC staff. Places I've worked see them as a commodity and don't believe they deserve to take on more responsibility.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  20. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    California
    Posts
    16

    Certifications
    CCNA: R&S, ITIL Foundation, ACMT, ACiT
    #19
    Just to throw a little curveball into this, I work in a NOC currently and while I do log into Cisco devices here and there, mostly we are doing Sysadmin type stuff and monitoring. I'm currently taking on every extra networking related project I can get my hands on and I've been fortunate to be involved in a few. Would you guys still advise against CCNP in my case? I really love Cisco networking and want to work towards more networking responsibilities within my company. Thoughts?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  21. Senior Member dontstop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    515

    Certifications
    CompTIA IT Fundamentals, CCENT, CCNA:R&S, BInfoTech
    #20
    Quote Originally Posted by drewbert87 View Post
    I really love Cisco networking and want to work towards more networking responsibilities within my company. Thoughts?
    I don't see why not to be honest. I'm not sure why people are making out that the CCNP is sacred knowledge. It's not like you're brain dumping and you'll still need to recert every 3 years anyway.

    When I was at University we had to learn much more complex and vague topics which seemed to have no applicability. As long as you lab the heck out of the topics and get comfortable with them and don't try just learn the material to pass the exam. I don't see why you wouldn't deserve to be called a CCNP.
    Last edited by dontstop; 04-14-2017 at 01:41 AM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  22. Senior Member shortstop20's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    136

    Certifications
    CCNA R&S
    #21
    Because there are lots of troubleshooting scenarios that an engineer with experience will encounter that a paper CCNP has never seen.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  23. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    De' Nile..
    Posts
    797

    Certifications
    "I eat SubNets like You for breakfast..."
    #22
    Quote Originally Posted by drewbert87 View Post
    Would you guys still advise against CCNP in my case?
    my 2 cents:
    As long as you are getting some kind of networking hands-on in your current role... go for it.
    More Knowledge is rarely a Bad thing.

    Even If you were just a SysAdmin, Or programmer, DBA, Web Developer, whatever.....
    you could STILL get it.
    But you will probably never get any Return on Investment from it.

    R.O.I., that's all you need to consider.

    Consider this:
    If you got your ccnp sooner (than later); maybe you can switch to a dedicated Network ROle at your current employer? That way, you can get really good ExP!

    But if your employer blocked you from moving... you could just Quit, and find some other ccna-level position.
    Get your EXP elsewhere.... then Slap CCNP onto your Resume :]
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  24. /threadkiller ande0255's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Around
    Posts
    1,160

    Certifications
    CCNA R&S, Voice, Security
    #23
    I didn't read every comment to see if this has been said, but I would broaden your base skill sets like A+ / MCSA / CCENT / CCNA while getting work experience, work experience is more important than certifications when moving up the food chain.

    Also, you will forget most of what you learned by the time you get a job that requires CCNP level skills, then you will be THAT guy with CCNP in his email signature, without a clue how to fix a complex network configuration (not that it is easy even with the skills but still).
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  25. Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    63

    Certifications
    CCNA R&S CompTIA A+
    #24
    This is a great thread, not very motivating, but great none the less. I am in the same situation as the OP, and presently studying switch on the NP path. But without a job that is remotely technical, the skills seem very 'perishable'. Perhaps I am wasting my time. I am prepared to drop salary for a NOC job, but I never hear back from recruiters. Getting into middle age, with management jobs behind me, perhaps its too late in the game to go back to technical (was MCSE and Netapp architect 10 years ago), and I might be better off in management. Problem is, I am really enjoying the Cisco cert path, and the technology....
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  26. What The?! Fulcrum45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    476

    Certifications
    CCNA: R&S, Security+, Network+, FCNSA, MTA 98-365
    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by ande0255 View Post
    I didn't read every comment to see if this has been said, but I would broaden your base skill sets like A+ / MCSA / CCENT / CCNA while getting work experience, work experience is more important than certifications when moving up the food chain.

    Also, you will forget most of what you learned by the time you get a job that requires CCNP level skills, then you will be THAT guy with CCNP in his email signature, without a clue how to fix a complex network configuration (not that it is easy even with the skills but still).
    I'm currently working on my MCSA because I actually do have decent amount of sys admin experience plus it's an attempt to make my certs a bit more well rounded. I'm thinking a decent compromise would be that I hover around the CCNA sector until I can make the excuse to work on a more advanced cert. I've always found wireless pretty interesting
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Social Networking & Bookmarks