+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 First 12
Results 26 to 27 of 27
  1. Senior Member chmorin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,443

    Certifications
    CCNP:Voice, CCNA:V(IIUC), CCNA, CCENT, Security +, Network +, A+,CIW
    #26
    In my experiance most broadcast storms are caused on the access layer by an unmanaged switch that the staff was not aware of and some users decided to plug in the loose cables. The means for troubleshooting this over a large WAN scale from a distance is dirty. At my old high school they had an issue where a 1st grade student accidentally did what I mentioned above. They literally had to bring down segments of the ISD's network until they isolated the issue.

    Though they couldn't make it any worse by doing this, since the storm had literally haulted the entire network.

    If it is not an access layer issue I would begin to investigate STP.

    If it has been going on for some hours now and you can still make changes to all of your equipment, it is probably not a broadcast storm.

    What exactly are you experiancing? I think you are mis-diagnosing the issue here.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS -->
  3. Member wolverene13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Maitland, Florida
    Posts
    86

    Certifications
    Network+, CCNA, CCNP
    #27
    Quote Originally Posted by chmorin View Post
    In my experiance most broadcast storms are caused on the access layer by an unmanaged switch that the staff was not aware of and some users decided to plug in the loose cables.
    Amen to that. It's always Sally from Accounting who wanted to extend the network to plug in her laptop, or Bill from Sales who walked by a switch and said "Hey, what's this cable doing unplugged? I should probably plug that back in!"
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 First 12

Social Networking & Bookmarks