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  1. Member
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    #26
    Man you are great. Keep up the good work.
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  3. Junior Member
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    #27

    Default I wish you the best.

    I wish you the best.
    Don't get too stressed because you need a good night's rest.
    Pace your self during the test by dividing the time into quarters and map them to the clock, then watch your time that way. Always answer the question even if you must guess and mark it for review after you have gone through the complete test. You have plenty of time. (Not like CISCO's STUPID CCNA exam)
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    #28
    Wow, i was thinking about taking the CEH course/exam but after reading this thread, I don't think I will.

    I am a CCNP engineer with over 5 years experience. I want to learn more about security and maybe eventually go into the security field so i'm looking for an avenue of studying. Typically i like certifications because they focus my thinking.

    I am looking at CCNA security but its REALLY not very helpful. Its just a bunch of aaa/vpn stuff with a concentration on SDM which i never see anyone use.

    I am really tempted to go for OSCP. I know it probably won't help my career, but if the knowledge is worth it then why not, right? Thoughts?
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    #29

    Default re: (Not like CISCO's STUPID CCNA exam)

    kryptos80

    Hi Kryptos80,

    When I mentioned the CCNA being stupid, what I was referring to was the fact that the test is not hard - it covers the usual: routers, CISCO's IOS, subnetting and such...

    It is just that it is made artificially difficult because they do not give you enough time to give much thought to the problem.

    For example you are shown 3 routers and given a description of a connection problem. Normally you would look at all router configs involved before answering. In the exam you are not given enough time to do that.

    I took the exam and passed it, but compared to Microsoft, Security+ and a bunch of others, you can fail this one not because you don't know the answer, but just because you are careful, just as you should be when messing with a live network.

    That was my 1st and last cert w/ CISCO because, in my opinion, they looked like money grabbers rather than trying to raise the standards of practice.

    Sorry if I misled you.
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  6. Certification Invigilator Forum Admin JDMurray's Avatar
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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by kryptos80 View Post
    I want to learn more about security and maybe eventually go into the security field so i'm looking for an avenue of studying. Typically i like certifications because they focus my thinking.
    Yes, many people like certifications because they provide a set of objectives for learning new material, much like the syllabus in a college class, and it helps them focus on studying the cert's subjects. But you can still study for a certification just to learn the material and not take the exam. The point of going for a cert in a new area of learning is mostly to learn the material and not take/pass the exam anyway. I've already done that with a few certs and will do it with a few more.
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  7. Senior Member holysheetman's Avatar
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    #31
    GREAT POST!

    In other news...hopefully when CEH v7.0 is released this Spring, I'll be sure to ask the administrator if the questions with the old tools are going to be removed... I am not even sure...
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  8. Senior Member powerfool's Avatar
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    #32
    Quote Originally Posted by WannaBeHacker View Post
    kryptos80

    Hi Kryptos80,

    When I mentioned the CCNA being stupid, what I was referring to was the fact that the test is not hard - it covers the usual: routers, CISCO's IOS, subnetting and such...

    It is just that it is made artificially difficult because they do not give you enough time to give much thought to the problem.

    For example you are shown 3 routers and given a description of a connection problem. Normally you would look at all router configs involved before answering. In the exam you are not given enough time to do that.

    I took the exam and passed it, but compared to Microsoft, Security+ and a bunch of others, you can fail this one not because you don't know the answer, but just because you are careful, just as you should be when messing with a live network.

    That was my 1st and last cert w/ CISCO because, in my opinion, they looked like money grabbers rather than trying to raise the standards of practice.

    Sorry if I misled you.
    Each level of Cisco certification is very different. I wouldn't throw it out because your experience with one (or maybe two) exams. In reality, I think there is adequate time. My issues with the CCNA are that they are very slow to remove old content from the criteria... it took them ages to remove IPX/SPX, and they still cover frame relay, to the best of my knowledge... time to move on to some basic MPLS if they want to cover a service backbone type network.
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  9. Senior Member powerfool's Avatar
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    #33
    Quote Originally Posted by kryptos80 View Post
    Wow, i was thinking about taking the CEH course/exam but after reading this thread, I don't think I will.

    I am a CCNP engineer with over 5 years experience. I want to learn more about security and maybe eventually go into the security field so i'm looking for an avenue of studying. Typically i like certifications because they focus my thinking.

    I am looking at CCNA security but its REALLY not very helpful. Its just a bunch of aaa/vpn stuff with a concentration on SDM which i never see anyone use.

    I am really tempted to go for OSCP. I know it probably won't help my career, but if the knowledge is worth it then why not, right? Thoughts?
    While the OSCP is sexy, the CCNA Security is very practical. I would implore you to truly review the material, even if you don't take the exam, and ask yourself how many networks you have seen that do not implement some of the basic mitigations that it covers. If you were to implement the mitigation strategies on a given network, many of the attacks on the CEH would be worthless. No ARP/IP spoofing/poisoning...

    I am halfway through my CCSP now and I am about ready to take my third exam. Out of the entire security track, I gained the most knowledge from the CCNA Security... each exam beyond that has only slightly increased my capabilities.

    But, I sit my SNAA next, then CEH, and then my CCSP IPS exam... after that, I will probably hit the OSCP after my break.
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  10. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #34
    thank you for this great post, right now i know where to focus on ^^
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  11. Senior Member
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    #35
    I have just taken and passed this exam. It took about 2 of the 4 hours allowed and I did zero preparation for it.

    I originally booked Version 6 and kept re-scheduling - it seems V6 has now gone and you are forced to do Version 7. In reality, I think that just means a few more updated questions to the existing pool of questions. So no real difference.

    There were some 'woolly worded' questions that could have been better phrased. Some were very ambiguous and in one case 2 technically correct answers - but obviously pick the 'wrong' one and you drop a point. Very US focussed questions - i.e. know your laws (including those that have been superceded)! Know how to use the 'common tools'. There were very few obscure tools mentioned - but lots of questions on the tools you would be using on a regular basis anyway.

    Much mention of older OS' such as NT which dates the question pool somewhat.

    In summary, my background and experience meant this was straightforward for me. It's a hard one to 'cram' for though, as you do need knowledge of a broad range of areas. I suspect the training course is very much geared to helping you pass although I have not tried the EC Council training.
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  12. Matrix(Config)# Roguetadhg's Avatar
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    #36
    I think this post should probably be read by anyone going for a certification to read through this thread with an open mind. For better or worse.

    At some point we've all heard "Certifications aren't as important as experience". Which, is better heard from someone that does interviews and knows something about the technology.

    I'd like to think that passing a certification, means you have acquired some experience that will be translated over to the career field. I love the networking field (I'm actively searching for an ISP position). It would be disheartening to find out the time spent, information read and all that time I could've been playing Skyrim (I've killed a single dragon. Once.) has been for nothing. Not to mention the money Im trying to ring up for networking equipment for my own labs
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  13. Senior Member Turgon's Avatar
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    #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Roguetadhg View Post
    I think this post should probably be read by anyone going for a certification to read through this thread with an open mind. For better or worse.

    At some point we've all heard "Certifications aren't as important as experience". Which, is better heard from someone that does interviews and knows something about the technology.

    I'd like to think that passing a certification, means you have acquired some experience that will be translated over to the career field. I love the networking field (I'm actively searching for an ISP position). It would be disheartening to find out the time spent, information read and all that time I could've been playing Skyrim (I've killed a single dragon. Once.) has been for nothing. Not to mention the money Im trying to ring up for networking equipment for my own labs
    Yes I agree. It's a shame Sexion8, Keatron, Mike and many other experienced people dont post more often, but people move on and get awfully busy as their careers take on more time consuming responsibilities. They just dont have time for TE anymore because they are specialists.

    Certifications offer framework and syllabus, a structure to introduce people to things. How far you take things beyond test prep is down to the wants and needs of the individual. Available time to study, background, interest, aptitude and the requirements of the individual in terms of leverage of applicability of the certification in the workplace are all factors. If the reason for the work is to get a feel for things one studies one way. On the other hand if this is your bread and butter you apply yourself in a different way.
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  14. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #38
    Sexion8,
    I appreciate your "ramblings" and I must say that I respect your point of view. Needless to say, you have stated your point effectively and have given a realistic guideline based on your experience and understanding of the material. For many years, I refused to take certs... mainly because of all the cert *hores which started back for me back when MCSE was the greatest rage back in the 90's if my memory serves me right. It sickened and frustrated me to the point wherein I would not even truly pay attention to your resume' because of it. My thoughts were... Great! You can read and answer questions but can you apply it in the real world? ... most of the time ... they could not.

    Don't get me wrong. I don't mind individuals who have the certs, in fact, that is wonderful! ... just as long they have the experience, knowledge and wisdom on how to apply what they have learned.
    Last edited by madmaus; 02-27-2012 at 04:45 AM.
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  15. Senior Member teancum144's Avatar
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    #39
    Quote Originally Posted by sexion8 View Post
    You will want to learn some form of programming language at its basic in the future should you want to be an effective security professional. Don't focus on tools as you won't always be in an environment to run certain tools. Suggestion: Perl or Python period. I'll keep any programming zealotry out of this as well.
    I really enjoyed your post, but I am curious, in your opinion, which is more useful for a security professional, Python or Pearl?
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  16. Certification Invigilator Forum Admin JDMurray's Avatar
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    #40
    Perl has been in use as the main scripting language in the UNIX/Linux world for nearly two decades. When dealing with systems, a security professional is far more likely to encounter Perl and a variety of shell interpreter languages far more often that any other scripting language. For Web-based investigations and research, you'd better know your JavaScript.
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  17. Senior Member dmoore44's Avatar
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    #41
    JD - I don't dispute what you're saying, and I know that Perl has a huge user base... but in my experience, I've used and written more Python scripts...
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    #42
    thanks for the shares bro appreciate your work .....
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  19. Sith Lord SephStorm's Avatar
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    #43
    Quote Originally Posted by madmaus View Post
    Sexion8,
    I appreciate your "ramblings" and I must say that I respect your point of view. Needless to say, you have stated your point effectively and have given a realistic guideline based on your experience and understanding of the material. For many years, I refused to take certs... mainly because of all the cert *hores which started back for me back when MCSE was the greatest rage back in the 90's if my memory serves me right. It sickened and frustrated me to the point wherein I would not even truly pay attention to your resume' because of it. My thoughts were... Great! You can read and answer questions but can you apply it in the real world? ... most of the time ... they could not.

    Don't get me wrong. I don't mind individuals who have the certs, in fact, that is wonderful! ... just as long they have the experience, knowledge and wisdom on how to apply what they have learned.
    A point which has been mentioned before. But the real issue is going from point A to B. There are no guidelines for gaining that experience, knowledge and wisdom, UNLESS you are in a position involving the duties. I am stuck at a helpdesk for the next three years. After I do labs out the wazzoo, then what? I literally cannot (officially...)do those duties. lets take it back a step. Guy graduates high school, goes to college and earns his BS with a networking speciality, if hes lucky, most schools claim the coursework will prep him for CCNA. Maybe he works at geek squad while in college in an attempt to get some experience. Based on what I hear, he still doesnt get hired for a networking job, because there is no guidance on what he needs to know to be gainfully employed in the field.
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  20. Senior Member diggitle's Avatar
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    #44
    Do i have to have all of the following below before I can be a pen tester?

    Mastery of the OSI model
    Routing TCP/IP volume I and II
    Network Security Architectures
    Network Security Fundamentals
    Designing for Cisco Internet work Solutions (CCDA)
    Linux Mastery
    Last edited by diggitle; 04-21-2014 at 03:21 AM.
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    #45
    Hi guys, some great posts. Ive been working in IT for around 15 year. I was thinking about doing the EH exam to add something a bit different to my CV, I'm not saying I want to be a pen tester as I probably don't have the ability but I find security and hacking interesting. I have access to CBT nuggets, what book would you recommend for studying for the EH course. As I say this is just to add something to my Microsoft certs.

    Thanks
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  22. California Kid JoJoCal19's Avatar
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    #46
    Quote Originally Posted by tolmie View Post
    Hi guys, some great posts. Ive been working in IT for around 15 year. I was thinking about doing the EH exam to add something a bit different to my CV, I'm not saying I want to be a pen tester as I probably don't have the ability but I find security and hacking interesting. I have access to CBT nuggets, what book would you recommend for studying for the EH course. As I say this is just to add something to my Microsoft certs.

    Thanks
    The new CEH All in One 2nd edition by Matt Walker is the best book hands down. I tried another newly released book and it was awful and I failed the exam. I've been reading the AIO book and it's 100% better and actually seems like it follows the exam objectives completely.

    CEH Certified Ethical Hacker All-in-One Exam Guide, Second Edition: Matt Walker: 9780071836487: Amazon.com: Books
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  23. Certification Invigilator Forum Admin JDMurray's Avatar
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    #47
    Quote Originally Posted by tolmie View Post
    As I say this is just to add something to my Microsoft certs.
    If you really want to spend US$600 just to add something interesting to your resume then go for it. I'll also say budget another US$300 and get the Security+ (SY0-401) first.
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  24. Member
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    #48
    What, is it $600 to sit the exam, didn't realise that. So it will be about Ł500 here in the uk, wowza
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  25. Certification Invigilator Forum Admin JDMurray's Avatar
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    #49
    The exam fee is US$500. If you don't take an "official" ECC training course (typically US$2500), you will need to pay an additional, non-refundable US$100 "application fee" when asking for approval to take the CEH exam. ECC's prices more than doubled when the CEH made the US DoD's approved certs list.
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    #50
    ahwell if that's the prices in the uk then that's probably ruled me out.
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