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  1. Junior Member slamwise's Avatar
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    #1

    Default Coding or IT work?

    Hi all,

    I'm a newbie trying to enter the tech world. I just passed my A+ exam, but after reading some disconcerting threads about the state of the IT market, I am unsure if I should go for the Network+ cert.

    I would like to jump on the Virtual Reality bandwagon before it takes off (even though I need a job now). Do you recommend that I continue building up certs or should I learn coding languages?

    As you can see, I'm fighting with the option of picking up a tech job quickly VS. potentially finding a coding job in the future. Any advice would be much appreciated! Thanks!


    PS. If there are certs that might prove useful for virtual reality tech, please let me know.
    Last edited by slamwise; 02-23-2015 at 05:13 PM.
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    #2
    It depends on what you really want to do with life. If you are going towards Virtual Reality type of work realize that the market is quite new and few companies are working on that technology. If you are looking into that field I see that a lot of C++ programmers and 3D engineers are filling that need.
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  4. Junior Member slamwise's Avatar
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    #3
    Thanks for the response.

    Do you know what kinds of positions are available for entry-level C++ programmers?
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  5. Senior Member ccnpninja's Avatar
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    #4
    One does not exclude the other. You may find a job while learning a programming language in your spare time or when you come home. Besides, having a job provides you with a steady income.
    Don't wait for the opportunity to come. Work hard and it WILL come.
    من طلب عزائم الأمور ، هان عليه بذل النفس فيها - محمد إبن ابي عامر
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    #5
    There's also the emergence of infrastructure-as-code / software-defined-infrastructure which includes networking. You'll most likely see this under the very broad and sometimes ambiguous 'devops' banner. It may be worth looking at git and provisioning/management scripts such as chef/puppet.
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  7. Objectives my friend! varelg's Avatar
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    #6
    You started your post with the statement about being a newbie and entering the IT market. I take that entering the IT field is what is actually concerning you and VR is something you'd like to pursue once you get your foot in the door. I however may be wrong.
    Try yourself at coding first, in your spare time and see if you like it. From what I've seen, the closer coders get to the actual machine code the closer they get to be hired. Am not saying you should code in all 1's and 0's, but dip yourself in Assembly and/or C. Embedded systems and such.
    How did you like studying for A+? Would you rather fix configurations and see the actual problem being physically represented? Maybe that is more exciting for you than coding?
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  8. Go ping yourself... phoeneous's Avatar
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by slamwise View Post
    Hi all,

    but after reading some disconcerting threads about the state of the IT market, I am unsure if I should go for the Network+ cert.
    The state of the IT market is always changing. Do what you like to do, not what others say is a good idea.
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  9. They are watching you NetworkNewb's Avatar
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    #8
    So you want to go into Programming (Virtual Reality) but got your A+ and are looking for tech jobs? Don't see how working on fixing computers is going to help you get a job doing what you want to do. Just because fixing computers and programming are both considered "IT" doesn't mean getting a job in one will help you get a job in the other later. Get a random job and start working on your coding skills. If your looking for types of jobs, go to Indeed and type in C+ programming...
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  10. Go ping yourself... phoeneous's Avatar
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by NetworkNewb View Post
    SJust because fixing computers and programming are both considered "IT" doesn't mean getting a job in one will help you get a job in the other later.
    This is completely and utterly false.
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  11. Junior Member slamwise's Avatar
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    #10
    Thanks for all the responses!

    To clarify, I am most interested in the aesthetic aspect of virtual reality, but do not know how to move in that direction. At the moment, I'm just pursuing certs for some credentials on my CV (my previous work experience was in a completely different field).

    *Sigh* feeling lost
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  12. Senior Member Kinet1c's Avatar
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by slamwise View Post
    Thanks for all the responses!

    To clarify, I am most interested in the aesthetic aspect of virtual reality, but do not know how to move in that direction. At the moment, I'm just pursuing certs for some credentials on my CV (my previous work experience was in a completely different field).

    *Sigh* feeling lost
    Chin up I felt completely and utterly lost for the first few years due to now knowing what I wanted to do. I sort of have a direction I want to go in now so just learning stuff as I go. Keep plugging away at study and certs.
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  13. Junior Member slamwise's Avatar
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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by varelg View Post
    You started your post with the statement about being a newbie and entering the IT market. I take that entering the IT field is what is actually concerning you and VR is something you'd like to pursue once you get your foot in the door.
    Yep, you hit it right on the money.

    I didn't care too much for the "physical components" part of the A+, and I definitely preferred the software/command line part. Which C language do you recommend? C++ or C#? I would really enjoy coding if I could see the effects come to fruition visually (visual learner).

    Any advice from anyone else would be great too, thanks!
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  14. Guest
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    #13
    I'd say look at job advertisements and pickup the skills listed on them

    Virtual Reality Programmer - Epic Games - Careers

    Qualifications
    • Strong C++ skills and the ability to code and architect various core engine systems
    • A keen analytical mind with strong problem solving skills to develop around the constraints of VR
    • Firm grasp of 3D math as it pertains to both 3D rendering and translating real-world motion into games
    • Demonstrated gameplay design sense and an interest in games
    • Experience with multiple core system tasks such as graphics, tools, audio/video, networking, memory handling, script compilers, I/O, etc.
    • 3 years professional experience developing games or game engine technology

    Preference to applicants with
    • Rendering experience
    • Experience with latency optimization
    • Experience with motion control systems, tracking, wearable computing, or other HIDs
    • Performance optimization skills
    A.A.S. in Networking Technologies
    A+, Network+, CCNA
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  15. JB3
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    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by slamwise View Post
    Yep, you hit it right on the money.

    I didn't care too much for the "physical components" part of the A+, and I definitely preferred the software/command line part. Which C language do you recommend? C++ or C#? I would really enjoy coding if I could see the effects come to fruition visually (visual learner).

    Any advice from anyone else would be great too, thanks!
    Start with C/C++ and then pick up C# if you are interested in writing stuff for Windows. Honestly, once you get a basic grasp of programming, switching from one language to the next is just a matter of syntax.
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  16. Junior Member slamwise's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB3 View Post
    Start with C/C++ and then pick up C# if you are interested in writing stuff for Windows. Honestly, once you get a basic grasp of programming, switching from one language to the next is just a matter of syntax.
    Cool, very helpful, thanks
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