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  1. Senior Member
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    #26
    I read through 1/4 of the TOGAF 9.1 Standard today. Took some more exams at openarch. I have an exam in one of my Master's courses this weekend so that may put a slight damper on my studies. I registered for Part 2 of TOGAF for May 11th. It is not even a possibility that I will not pass the Part 1 exam, I am dumping a ridiculous amount of hours into studying.
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    #27
    I just pulled in the test date from the 30th to the 23rd. I feel that with a solid weekend of study I will be ready. I am already hitting 80-90% on the practice exams and I'm halfway through reading TOGAF 9.1. There are just a few areas I need to brush up on.
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  4. Are we having fun yet? UnixGuy's Avatar
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    #28
    Impressive. Good luck Phil
    Goal: GCFA (DONE), GPEN
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    #29
    So, I ran through another round of the tests off the openarch as well as the .99 cents test from The Open Group. I have a list of notes from the tests that I will fill out tomorrow, I will post my study notes on my blog, then Sunday will be more test taking and finishing the read of the TOGAF standard. I take the exam 4PM CST Monday 23rd.

    Quote Originally Posted by N2IT View Post
    2 more years at the BA level and TOGAF IMO would help tremendously. I've got them to buy in for the Agile Certification from PMI. Since I am not an enterprise level resource, more of a devops resource in our operation, they don't understand why I want nor do they agree with my decision to go with TOGAF.

    I'll take then up on the Agile offer and then wait to strike for TOGAF, unless I am motivated by this thread then all bets are off.

    Back to developing this SharePoint site.
    I was thinking of Agile cert, but it will have to come after MCSD and MCSE Data Platform. Also thinking of PMP since it seems to be a check box these days.

    I'm still homing in on my ultimate career plan and it looks like:

    Focus on Architecture, SQL (Data), Coding. Take my Masters in Information Assurance along with a few Reverse Engineering and Malware courses and go after a role doing Web Application, General Software, and Enterprise Architecture Cyber QA.
    Last edited by Plantwiz; 03-22-2015 at 01:40 AM. Reason: consecutive posting
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    #30
    I've all but given up on the PMP. I failed it once and then never went back. The more I read up on it the more disinterested I become in it. App dev is my thing so the PMP doesn't really synch up. It's a very OLD methodology and doesn't really snap into an app dev environment.

    A lot of the tools and techniques are from the 50's, such as WBS and GANTT charts. I find myself a little more progressive than that

    Obviously it has some good take away's, but not enough for me to get certified in it. JMHO
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    #31
    I'm almost done with my TOGAF notes I am going to start posting them here as well as on my blog as I finish them.
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    #32
    Architecture Capability

    1. What are the Recommendations for Architecture Capability building?
    a. An architecture capability is not a one-off task but rather an iterative process that flows through the ADM.
    2. What are the parts of the Architecture Capability Framework (ACF) and what do they do?
    a. The ACF consists of the following parts:
    i. Architecture Board: This is a cross-organization board comprised of key stakeholders. They oversee compliance, decision making, and Improving the maturity level of the enterprise.
    ii. Architecture Compliance
    1. Consists of a 6 class model that dictates the compliance of an architecture these classes are:
    a. Irrelevant: The implementation has no features in common with the architecture specification
    b. Consistent: The implementation has some of the architecture specification features as well as having some features not covered by the specification.
    c. Compliant: This implementation has some of the specification features.
    d. Conformant: This implementation has all of the specification features but also has some features not required by the specification.
    e. Fully Conformant: The implementation is fully in sync with the specification.
    f. Non-Conformant: Some of the features of the specification are implemented but not in accordance with the specification.
    iii. Architecture Contracts
    1. Architecture contracts are joint agreements between the development partners and sponsors on the deliverables, quality, and fitness for purpose of an architecture.
    iv. Architecture Governance
    1. Architecture Governance is the practice and orientation by which enterprise architectures and other architectures are managed and controlled at an enterprise-wide level.
    v. Architecture Maturity Models
    1. Also known as Capability Maturity Models, helps an enterprise drive its architecture through the change process.
    vi. Architecture Skills Framework
    1. Helps define roles and skills associated with roles.
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    #33
    Architecture Development Model (ADM)

    1. What are the Key Points of the ADM Cycle
    a. Consists of 10 phases
    b. Is an iterative process
    c. You can iterate through all phases, some of the phases, or a single phase.
    d. Starts with the Preliminary Phase.
    e. The preliminary phase is only done once.
    2. What are the Guidelines for adapting the ADM process?
    a. There are several reasons for wanting to adapt the ADM Process:
    i. The ADM is one of the many Corporate Processes
    ii. The ADM is being mandated for use by a prime or lead contractor.
    iii. The enterprise is a small to medium business and wishes to use a “cut-down” method.
    iv. The enterprise is very large and complex , and comprises several linked enterprises.
    v. Using the ADM in a vendor or production environment.
    3. What is Gap Analysis
    a. Gap analysis is a comparison between the Baseline and Target Architecture. Its results are put into the Architecture Definition Document.
    4. What are the main objectives of the phases?
    1) Preliminary Phase
    2) Architecture Vision
    3) Business Architecture
    4) Application Architecture
    5) Technology Architecture
    6) Opportunities and Solutions
    7) Implementation management
    8 Architecture Governance
    9) Architecture Change Management
    10) Requirements management
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    #34
    Architecture General

    1. What is the definition of Architecture in the Context of TOGAF?
    a. A formal description of a system, or a detailed plan of the system at the component level, to guide its implementation (source: ISO/IEC 42010:2007)
    b. The structure of components, their inter-relationships, and the principles and guidelines governing their design and evolution over time.
    2. What are the reasons to use an Enterprise Architecture Framework?
    a. Architecture Frameworks Provide the following benefits:
    i. More Efficient Business Operations
    ii. More Efficient IT Operations
    iii. Better Return on Investment
    iv. Reduced risk of Future Investments
    v. Faster, Simpler, and Cheaper Procurement.
    3. What is an Enterprise Architecture Capability?
    a. Also known as an architecture practice, an Enterprise Architecture Capability, is the capability of an Enterprise to execute Architecture.
    4. What are Architecture Principles and what are its parts?
    a. They are developed in the Preliminary Phase
    b. An architecture principle defines the underlying general rules and guidelines for the use and deployment of all IT resources and assets across the enterprise.
    c. The Architecture Principles consists of four parts which are: the Name, Statement, Rationale, and Implications.
    d. Architecture Principles are considered using five criteria: Complete, Consistent, Stable, Understandable, and Robust.
    5. What is the Architecture Vision and how is it developed
    a. The architecture vision is created in the Preliminary Phase.
    b. It is a summary of the changes to the enterprise that will accrue from successful deployment of the Target Architecture.
    c. Consists of a: Problem Description, Objective of the Statement of Work, Summary views Needed for the Request for Architecture work
    d. Mapped Requirements
    e. Reference to Draft Architecture Definition Document
    f. Version 0.1 Business, Application, Data, and Technology Architectures
    6. What is the purpose of the architecture requirements specification?
    a. Provides a set of quantitative statements that outline what an implementation project must do in order to comply with the architecture.
    b. It is a major part of the implementation contract.
    c. Consists of Requirements, contracts, guidelines, and specifications.
    d. Provides a quantitative view of the solution, stating measurable criteria that must be met during the implementation of the architecture.
    7. What is the Architecture Definition Document? What is its purpose?
    a. The deliverable container for the core architectural artifacts created during a project and for important related information.
    b. Provides a qualitative view of the solution and aims to communicate the intent of the architects.
    8. How does the Architecture Definition Document differ from the Architecture Requirements Specification?
    a. The architecture definition document is a qualitative view intending to communicate the intent of the architects whereas the requirements specification is a quantitative document that is stating the measurable criteria which the architecture must meet during its implementation.
    9. What are the Dimensions for Defining Scope of an Architecture?
    a. The dimensions for defining scope are:
    i. The breadth of coverage of the enterprise
    ii. The level of detail required
    iii. The partitioning characteristics of the architecture
    iv. The specific architecture domains to be covered
    v. The extent of time period, plus the number and extent of any intermediate time period
    vi. The architectural assets to be leveraged or considered for use from the enterprise continuum.
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    #35
    Architecture Governance

    1. What are the benefits of Architecture Governance?
    a. Links IT processes, resources, and information to organizational strategies and objectives
    b. Integrates and institutionalizes IT best practices
    c. Aligns with industry frameworks
    d. Enables the organization to take full advantage of its information, infrastructure, and hardware and software needs.
    e. Protects the underlying digital assets of the organization
    f. Supports regulatory and best practice requirements such as auditability security, responsibility, and accountability
    g. Promotes visible risk management.
    2. How is Architecture Governance performed?
    a. It is performed using the key process in the Architectural Governance Framework as well as the following steps from Phase G in the ADM:
    i. Confirm Scope and Priorities for Deployment and Development Management
    ii. Identify Deployment Resources and Skills
    iii. Guide Development of Solutions Deployment
    iv. Perform Enterprise Architecture Compliance Reviews
    v. Implement Business and IT Operations
    vi. Perform Post-Implementation Review and Close the Implementation.
    3. What are six characteristics used in TOGAF to highlight both the value and necessity for governance?
    a. Discipline
    b. Transparency
    c. Independence
    d. Accountability
    e. Responsibility
    f. Fairness
    4. What are parts of the TOGAF Architecture Governance Framework?
    a. The architecture Governance Framework consists of 5 main parts Process, Content, Process Flow Control, Repository, and Context
    b. The key processes are:
    i. Policy Management and Take-on
    1. Take all architecture amendments, contracts, and supporting information under governance through a formal process in order to register, validate, ratify, manage, and publish new or updated content.
    ii. Compliance
    1. Perform Compliance Assessments against SLA, OLA, standards, regulatory requirements in order to ensure stability, conformance, and performance monitoring.
    iii. Dispensation
    1. A method for providing a temporary pathway to conformance while alternative methods are being developed.
    iv. Monitoring and Reporting
    1. Managing the operational and service agreements against a criteria. Including monitoring against service and operational agreements, feedback for adjustment, and reporting.
    v. Business Control
    1. The processes invoked to ensure compliance with the organization’s business policies
    vi. Environment Management
    1. Identify all services required to ensure that the repository based environment underpinning the governance framework is effective and efficient.
    5. What is the Architecture Board and what are its responsibilities?
    a. The architecture board oversees implementation of the strategy.
    b. Consists of key stakeholders in the architecture.
    c. Is responsible for:
    i. Decision making with regard to architectures
    ii. Consistency between sub-architectures
    iii. Establishing targets for re-use of components
    iv. Flexibility of enterprise architecture
    v. Enforcement of Architecture Compliance
    vi. Improving maturity level of architecture discipline within organization
    vii. Ensuring that the discipline of architecture-based development is adopted.
    viii. Supporting a viable escalation capability for out-of-bounds decisions.
    6. What are architecture contracts? Who uses them and when?
    a. Architecture contracts are part of the Architectural Capability Framework and are joint agreements between development partners and sponsors on the deliverables, quality, and fitness-for-purpose of an architecture.
    b. The Architecture Governance oversees the Architecture Contracts
    7. What is the purpose of a Compliance Assessment?
    a. The compliance assessment is done in Phase G
    b. The compliance assessment exists to:
    i. Review the implementation projects progress and to ensure that the design and implementation is proceeding in-line with the strategic and architectural objectives
    c. The compliance assessment consists of:
    i. Overview of project progress and status
    ii. Overview of project architecture/design
    iii. Completed Architecture Checklists
    d. The steps of a compliance assessment are:
    i. Review ongoing implementation governance and architecture compliance for each building block
    ii. Conduct post-development reviews
    iii. Close development part of deployment projects
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    #36
    Architecture Repository

    1. What is the Architecture Repository, what are its parts and what are their purpose?
    a. The Architecture Repository is a part of the larger Enterprise Repository. The architecture Repository exists to store different classes of architectural output at different levels of abstraction.
    b. The Architecture Repository consists of 6 classes of Architectural Information:
    i. Architecture Metamodel:
    1. The Metamodel describes the tailored application of the architecture framework this includes the Architecture Method and Content Metamodel which were selected in the Preliminary phase.
    ii. Architecture Capability:
    1. The architecture capability defines the parameters, structures, and processed that support governance of the architecture repository.
    iii. Architecture Landscape:
    1. This shows what architecture is in play within the enterprise. It represents assets in use, or planned by the enterprise.
    2. It consists of three architecture types Strategic, Segment, and Capability
    iv. Standards Information Base:
    1. This captures the standards the new architecture must comply with. This may be industry standards, selected products/services, or services in the organization.
    2. This consists of standards for each of the domains business, data, application, technology
    v. Reference Library:
    1. This contains guidelines, templates, patterns, and other forms of reference material that can be leveraged in order to accelerate the creation of new architectures
    vi. Governance Log:
    1. This holds records of governance activity across the enterprise.
    2. What is the Enterprise Continuum and what is its purpose?
    a. The enterprise continuum sets the broader context for an architect and explains how generic solutions can be leveraged and specialized.
    b. The Enterprise Continuum is divided into two sets of inner continuums:
    i. Architecture Continuum: A non-implementation specific continuum covers target architectures and Architecture building blocks during Phase A-D
    ii. Solution Continuum: An implementation specific continuum covering transition architectures and Solution Building Blocks in Phase E-F.
    c. The Enterprise Continuum consists of Four classification categories ranging from broadest to most specific:
    i. Foundation Architectures
    ii. Common System Architectures
    iii. Industry Specific Architectures
    iv. Organization Specific Architectures
    3. What is a building block?
    a. A building block is a potentially reusable component of business, IT, or architectural capability that can be combined with other building blocks to deliver architectures and solutions.
    b. Building Blocks have the following general characteristics
    i. A package of functionality defined to meet business needs
    ii. Type that corresponds to TOGAF content Metamodel
    iii. Has a defined boundary and is recognizable as a thing by domain experts.
    iv. May interoperate or be interdependent with other building blocks
    v. Considers implementation, usage, and evolves to exploit technology and standards
    vi. Assembled from other building blocks
    vii. Subassembly of other building blocks
    viii. Is re-usable and replaceable, and well specified.
    c. There are two main types of building blocks: Architectural Building Blocks and Solution Building Blocks
    i. Architectural Building Block: specific functionality and attributes and are not implementation specific. They include:
    1. Fundamental Functionality and Attributes
    2. Interfaces
    3. Interoperability
    4. Dependent Building Blocks
    5. Maps to Business/Org entities
    ii. Solution Building Block: define the products and components to implement the functionality, define the implementation, fulfil business requirements, and are product or vendor aware. They include:
    1. Specific Functionality
    2. Interfaces
    3. Required SBB’s
    4. Mapping SBBs to IT Topology
    5. Specification of the attributes
    6. Performance Configurability
    7. Design Drives and Constraints
    8. Relationships between SBB’s and ABB’s.
    4. What is a Matrix?
    a. A matrix is a grid that shows relationships between two or more model entities. They represent relationships that are list based rather than graphical.
    5. What is a catalog?
    a. A catalog is a list of building blocks as a specific type or related types used for governance or reference purpose.
    6. What are patterns?
    a. Patterns are a way of putting building blocks into context. Basically, Patterns tell you how, when, and why to use certain building blocks. A pattern contains the following content:
    i. Name
    ii. Problem
    iii. Context
    iv. Forces
    v. Solution
    vi. Resulting Context
    vii. Examples
    viii. Rationale
    ix. Related Patterns
    x. Known Uses
    7. What is a deliverable?
    a. A deliverable is the contractual or formal work products of an architecture project. These deliverables are typically constrained or altered by any overarching project or process management for the enterprise.
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    #37
    Architecture Views

    1. What is a viewpoint? What is a view? How are they Different?
    a. Viewpoint
    i. A viewpoint describes the perspective from which a view is taken. A viewpoint has the following characteristics:
    1. How to construct and use a view
    2. The information that should appear in a view
    3. The modeling techniques for expressing the information
    4. The rationale for these choices
    ii. A viewpoint can be reused and is typically generic.
    b. View
    i. A view is a representation of a whole system from the perspective of a related set of concerns.
    ii. A view is specific to the architecture for which it is created.
    2. What are the steps to create the required views for a particular architecture?
    a. There are three main steps for creating views:
    i. Refer to an existing library of viewpoints
    ii. Select the appropriate viewpoints
    iii. Generate views of the system by using the selected viewpoints as templates.
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    #38
    Business Architecture

    1. What is a Business Scenario?
    a. Business scenarios are a technique used to describe:
    i. A business process, application, or set of applications that can be enabled by the architecture.
    ii. The business and technology environment
    iii. The people and computing components (“Actors”) who execute the scenario.
    iv. The desired outcome of proper execution
    b. A good business scenario follows the SMART acronym: Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Realistic, Time-Bound
    c. The process for a business scenario is:
    i. Identifying, documenting, and ranking the problem driving the scenario
    ii. Identifying the business and technical environment of the scenario and documenting it in scenario models.
    iii. Identifying and documenting desired objectives
    iv. Identifying the human actors and their place in the business model
    v. Identifying computer actors and their place in the technology model
    vi. Identifying and documenting roles, responsibilities, and measures of success per actor.
    vii. Checking for fitness-for-purpose and refining if necessary
    d. Business Scenarios Typically happen in Phase A.
    2. What is the Capability Assessment and when is it done?
    a. The capability assessment is performed in Phase A.
    b. It consists of:
    i. Business Capability Assessment
    ii. IT Capability Assessment
    iii. Architecture Maturity Assessment
    iv. Business Transformation Readiness Assessment
    c. It is not to be confused with a Gap Analysis which is the analysis of the Baseline vs Target architecture
    3. What is the Business Transformation Readiness Assessment
    a. Consists of a series of actions to understand the readiness of the organization to accept change. Those actions are:
    i. Determine the readiness factors that will impact the organization
    ii. Present the readiness factors using maturity models
    iii. Assess the readiness factors, including determination of readiness factor ratings
    iv. Assess the risks for each readiness factor and identify improvement actions to mitigate the risk
    v. Work these actions into Phase E and F Implementation and Migration Plan
    4. What is Capability-Based Planning
    a. Is a process that focuses on the planning, engineering, and delivery of strategic business capabilities to the enterprise.
    b. It consists of three dimensions (People, Process, and Material)
    c. Each dimension has a series of capability increments.
    5. What is the communication plan and when is it created?
    a. Allows effective communication of targeted information to the right stakeholders at the right time
    b. Its Contents are:
    i. Identification of stakeholders and grouping by communication requirements
    ii. Identification of communication needs, key messages in relation to architecture vision, communication risks, and critical success factors (CSF)
    iii. Identification mechanisms that will be used to communicate with stakeholders
    iv. Identification of a communication timetable
    c. Created in Phase A
    6. What is the Purpose of the Architecture Road Map
    a. To List out individual work packages that will realize the target architecture in a timeline showing progression from the Baseline to the Target Architecture.
    b. It highlights the work packages business value at each stage.
    c. It is developed incrementally through phase E and F
    d. It consists of:
    i. Work Package Portfolio
    ii. Implementation Factor Assessment and Deduction Matrix
    iii. Consolidation Gaps, Solutions, and Dependencies Matrix
    iv. Transition Architectures
    v. Implementation Recommendations
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    #39
    Change Management1. What are the categories of Change in Change Management
    a. There are three categories for change:
    i. Simplification Change: This can be normally handled via change management techniques
    ii. Incremental Change: May be capable of being handled via change or may require partial re-architecting depending on the nature of the change
    iii. Re-Architecting Change: Requires putting the whole architecture through the development cycle again.
    b. There are three main guidelines for Maintenance vs Architecture Redesign
    i. If the change impacts two stakeholders or more then it likely requires an architecture redesign and recycle of the ADM.
    ii. If it impacts only one stakeholder it is likely to be a change management candidate.
    iii. If it can be handled via dispensation, meaning it can be used for a period of time until a suitable replacement can be found, it is likely to be a change management candidate.
    c. Additional way of looking at change is:
    i. Simplification Change: is driven by a requirement to reduce investment
    ii. Incremental Change: is driven by a requirement to derive additional value from existing investment
    iii. Re-Architecting Change: is driven by a requirement to increase investment in order to create new value for exploitation.
    Last edited by philz1982; 03-21-2015 at 10:20 PM.
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    #40
    Implementation

    1. When is the Cost/benefit analysis done?
    a. During the Migration Planning Phase
    2. What is the Implementation and Migration Plan?
    a. The Implementation and Migration Plan is started in Phase E and is completed in Phase F. It provides a schedule of all projects that will be used to achieve the target architecture.
    b. When the Transition Architectures and Work Packages are put into the Architecture Roadmap a timeline is created. This timeline is used to provide context to activities within the Implementation and Migration plan.
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    #41
    Risk Management

    1. What are the two levels of Risk?
    a. Initial Level of Risk: Risk Categorization prior to determining and implementing mitigating actions
    b. Residual Level of Risk: Risk Categorization after implementation of mitigating actions
    2. What is the process for Risk Management?
    a. Risk Classification -> Risk Identification -> Initial Risk Assessment -> Risk Mitigation and Residual Risk Assessment -> Risk Monitoring
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    #42
    TOGAF General

    1. What is the structure of the TOGAF Document?
    a. The TOGAF Document consists of 7 parts
    i. Part 1: Introduction, Provides high level introductions, definitions, and key concepts.
    ii. Part 2: ADM- This part is core to TOGAF and describes the steps of the ADM.
    iii. Part 3: ADM Guidelines and Techniques: This part contains a collection of guidelines and techniques available for use in applying TOGAF and the TOGAF ADM
    iv. Part 4: The Architecture Content Framework: This discusses the Architecture Content Framework which is a structured meta model for architectural artifacts, the use of re-usable architecture building blocks, and an overview of typical architecture deliverables
    v. Part V: Enterprise Continuum and tools: This part discusses appropriate taxonomies and tools to categorize and store the outputs of architecture activity within an enterprise.
    vi. Part VI: TOGAF Reference Models: This part provides a selection of architectural reference models, which includes the TOGAF Foundation Architecture and the Integrated Information Infrastructure Reference Model.
    vii. Part VII: Architecture Capability Framework: Discusses the organization, processes, skills, roles, and responsibilities required to establish and operate an architecture function within an enterprise.
    2. What is the Technical Reference Model and Service Categories?
    a. The TRM focuses on the application platform. Unlike the III-RM which is a CSA the TRM is a Foundation Architecture. Its focus is to provide foundation on which more specific architectures and components can be built. The objectives of the TRM are:
    i. To provide a widely accepted core taxonomy and an appropriate visual representation of that taxonomy.
    ii. To promote application portability via API’s
    iii. To promote interoperability through the Common Infrastructure Interface (CII).
    b. The TRM consists of
    i. Application Software
    ii. Application platform
    iii. Communications Infrastructure
    iv. Application Platform Interface
    v. Communications Infrastructure Interface
    3. What is the Integrated Information Infrastructure Reference Model taxonomy?
    a. The III-RM focuses on the application software space or Common Systems architecture. Contrast this to the TRM which focuses on the Application Platform space. This can trick you up because they both deal with the application architecture. The III-RM consists of a taxonomy and a III-RM Graphic.
    b. The III-RM is concerned with the software side of the Application platform and the API’s associated with the application platform.
    c. The core components of the III-RM are:
    i. Business Applications: Brokering, Information provider/consumer applications
    ii. Infrastructure Applications: Development Tools, Management Utilities
    iii. Application Platform
    iv. Interfaces
    v. Qualities
    4. What is Boundary-less Information Flow?
    a. It is a trademark of the Open Group
    b. A shorthand representation of “Access to integrated information to support business process improvements” representing a desired state of an enterprise’s infrastructure specific to the business needs of the organization
    5. How do you best describe TOGAF?
    a. TOGAF is a framework, a detailed method and a set of supporting tools, for developing an enterprise architecture.
    6. What is the purpose of the Architecture Content Framework?
    a. The architecture content Framework provides a structural model for architectural content in order to provide a consistent framework for the definition, structure, and presentation of major work products created during the ADM cycle.
    b. The Architecture Content Framework consists of three categories:
    i. Deliverable: A work product that is contractually specified and in turn formally reviewed, agreed, and signed off by stakeholders. It represents the output of projects.
    ii. Artifact: Architectural work product that describes an aspect of the architecture. Generally classified as catalogs, matrixes, and diagrams.
    iii. Building Block: Represents potentially re-usable component of business, IT, or architectural capability that can be composed of or combined with other building blocks.
    7. What are the four categories for TOGAF Document Categorization Model?
    a. The DCM consists of four categories: Core, Mandated, Recommended, Supporting
    i. Core: fundamental concepts that form the essence of TOGAF
    ii. Mandated: normative parts of the TOGAF specification. These elements are central to TOGAF and without them the framework would not be considered “TOGAF”
    iii. Recommended: A pool of resources that are referenced in TOGAF as ways in which the TOGAF Core and Mandated categories can be executed.
    iv. Supporting: Additional resources that are not referenced in the other three TOGAF categories but provide valuable assistance.
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  19. Senior Member
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    #43
    Well that's it folks, those are all of my notes. Feel free to add your own.
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    #44
    Well done Philz! Thanks for taking the time to add these notes, I know several people will appreciate it!
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    #45
    I wish I could take the exam tomorrow, I feel so ready but I have to wait for Monday 4pm. Then I have to figure out how to study for the TOGAF Part 2 exam at least part 2 is open book though. I'm debating pushing out the the first MCSD exam and pulling in the TOGAF 2 exam.
    Last edited by philz1982; 03-22-2015 at 01:14 AM.
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    #46
    Kill the TOGAF then transition into the developer track.
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  23. Senior Member
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    #47
    Here is what I am thinking:

    TOGAF: Overall Architecture by April
    MCSD: Application Domain By October
    Masters in IA with a focus on reverse engineering, secure software development, and web application testing: December this Year
    MCSE SQL DP: Data Domain By Feb 2016
    Masters in IS: December 2016
    ITL Foundation : Technology Domain:Sometime in the future...
    Scrum master or PMI Agile : Something around the more AGILE development methodologies Not sure when


    Add to this some offensive security certs and I should have a solid platform for Enterprise Architecture with a focus on Security and Applications.
    Last edited by philz1982; 03-22-2015 at 02:55 PM.
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    #48
    Call it a career after all of that.

    Then it's delivery and collecting massive bonus checks.
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  25. California Kid JoJoCal19's Avatar
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    #49
    Thanks for the notes Phil. And your career plan looks similar to one of the paths I've been thinking of taking. I really feel like even though I have over 8 years of InfoSec experience, I'm more of a Security JOAT. Even now I'm doing more audit and security PM, which is just adding even more to my overall security experience.I just want to nail down a specific path or specialty and software/dev has been something that has always interested me, and since I'm in security, secure programming has been of interest.
    Last edited by JoJoCal19; 03-23-2015 at 03:20 PM. Reason: Typo: *specialty
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, GCIA, GSEC, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, BSBA - University of Florida, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: MS Cybersecurity, Learning Python
    Next Up:​ None
    Reading:​ Python Crash Course
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    #50
    Quote Originally Posted by JoJoCal19 View Post
    Thanks for the notes Phil. And your career plan looks similar to one of the paths I've been thinking of taking. I really feel like even though I have over 8 years of InfoSec experience, I'm more of a Security JOAT. Even now I'm doing more audit and security PM, which is just adding even more to my overall security experience.I just want to nail down a specific path or specificity and software/dev has been something that has always interested me, and since I'm in security, secure programming has been of interest.
    The more I play with the higher level programs the easier they become. It's really all about creating functions and objects and making them play nicely together. When you get down in the X86 X64 Realm it becomes a little more confusing because it's not a natural as reading code.

    Where I'm going with this is, I have no desire to be in the OPS world. I am coming from the design phase into the programming realm. I want to stay with design architecting but be able to do Secure Design/ Secure SDLC.

    Let's stay in touch and perhaps you can learn from my mistakes as I blaze down this path
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