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  1. Member
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    #1

    Default Infosec Security Clearance? What does it mean? how to get it?

    hello fellow Infosec people. i have a security + and GCIH certification.

    but i'm looking around at job descriptions and i often see (Clearance Level Needed) - what does it mean? are there diff types of clearance..

    how is a security clearance different from having certifications? im just curious about that.

    I found this pdf document but - i'm wondering how does this apply to Information Security. I keep seeing jobs that ask for "minimium security clearance" and they give acronyms that i've never heard of before.

    https://www.clearancejobs.com/securi...arance_faq.pdf
    Last edited by bkhayes; 03-10-2015 at 08:21 PM.
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  3. Senior Member aftereffector's Avatar
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    #2
    A security clearance just means that you have been investigated and are qualified to receive and handle material that is classified at a certain level. For instance, the military uses Secret and Top Secret designations for its classified data, and servicemembers may be granted a Secret or TS clearance to perform their duties. There are different agencies that grant clearances - for instance, the Department of Defense and the Department of State both issue Top Secret clearances but through a slightly different process.

    Unfortunately, unlike certifications, security clearances aren't something that we as individuals can apply for. The clearance investigation must be initiated by your employer.
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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by aftereffector View Post
    A security clearance just means that you have been investigated and are qualified to receive and handle material that is classified at a certain level. For instance, the military uses Secret and Top Secret designations for its classified data, and servicemembers may be granted a Secret or TS clearance to perform their duties. There are different agencies that grant clearances - for instance, the Department of Defense and the Department of State both issue Top Secret clearances but through a slightly different process.

    Unfortunately, unlike certifications, security clearances aren't something that we as individuals can apply for. The clearance investigation must be initiated by your employer.
    wow. very interesting. so - i need to work for a place that initiates it for me. very cool. i hope i can get one someday.

    i have a question then, what does DoD 8570 clearance mean.

    i see this website says that GIAC certifications mean that - i have it. am i wrong?

    Dept of Defense Directive: DoDD 8570

    https://www.sans.org/media/dod8570/dod8570.pdf
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  5. Senior Member aftereffector's Avatar
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    #4
    DoD 8570 is something quite different actually! That directive outlines the minimum certification requirements for certain defined positions (IAM, IAT, and IASAE levels I through III, plus a few others). Several different certs can fulfill the requirements for a particular position. For instance, CISSP can be used to cover IAT III, IAM II, and IAM III, as well as IASAE I and II.

    Here is the information straight from the source:
    DoD Approved 8570 Baseline Certifications
    and
    DoD 8570 Information Assurance Workforce Improvement Program Home
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by aftereffector View Post
    DoD 8570 is something quite different actually! That directive outlines the minimum certification requirements for certain defined positions (IAM, IAT, and IASAE levels I through III, plus a few others). Several different certs can fulfill the requirements for a particular position. For instance, CISSP can be used to cover IAT III, IAM II, and IAM III, as well as IASAE I and II.

    Here is the information straight from the source:
    DoD Approved 8570 Baseline Certifications
    and
    DoD 8570 Information Assurance Workforce Improvement Program Home
    thanks man. i appreciate it.
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