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  1. Senior Member
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    #51
    Quote Originally Posted by xxxkaliboyxxx View Post
    You are 1 out of 100 hiring authorities that do not see it that way. CISSP is required by the contract or hiring agency to just get interviewed. In those cases, doesn't matter if you are a hacking child prodigy who hacked the national bank at 15 years old, but doesn't have a BS or CISSP, you won't get the interview.

    Commendable for your point of view, but just not valid for a lot of agency jobs or companies trying to work with the government in the US.
    Sadly, this is an accurate portrayal of of the general state "cyber" security in government and the corporate world. That really needs to change. I wish more organizations would take ramrunner800's approach.
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  3. Are we having fun yet? UnixGuy's Avatar
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    #52
    Quote Originally Posted by kurosaki00 View Post
    .... I asked him WTF, why hire someone without experience for a position requiring a lot of in dept network skills? He said that he had CCNA and that was a very difficult certification. He assumed he had the skills.

    I finished my contract, delivered my sh1t and off I went to a new gig.

    Oh dear...why am I not even surprised. I've seen way too many stupid hiring decisions that nothing surprise me anymore.
    Goal: GCFA (DONE), GPEN
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  4. Senior Member
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    #53
    Sadly these stories seem to be the norm.

    I've seen other tech positions hiring strictly because of certificate. Some people can't get the idea that the whole package is what you look at not some subset......

    This can swing the other way as well, just degree or just experience. I understanding weighting from your personal experiences or what you feel best aligns with the position or company itself, but to just isolate one piece is strange.
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  5. Senior Member
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    #54
    Quote Originally Posted by EnderWiggin View Post
    Having someone with a bunch of certifications and having a knowledgeable security team are not the same thing. It is entirely possible to learn technical skills without taking a multiple choice test afterwards.

    Your story also looks like it has nothing to do with certifications, and everything to do with leadership that didn't prioritize security.
    No. They are not but the IT guy that chooses to look into infosec as a hobby or another interest will have some motivation to join other groups and attend CTF conferences where we can build a foundation of knowledge. Most of these people who have this type of interest of infosec excel within the field.

    Actually it is about the one IT guy who did not save everyone's bacon but knew how to react because he knew how to respond to an incident, especially when everyone else does not look at security as a priority until it happens to them.
    Last edited by bigdogz; 07-17-2017 at 05:52 PM.
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  6. Senior Member
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    #55
    Quote Originally Posted by ITHokie View Post

    More importantly, I think what the poster is alluding to is that there are many facets of security requiring diverse skills. Having certifications corresponding to those various skills is useful. Being certified in all of those various areas isn't necessary but it makes sense as it gives employers an indication that that one has some baseline level of knowledge there. Individuals with backgrounds in multiple areas are especially valuable because they have idea of how various components of security operations should work together.
    ...and this was my second point. Correct.
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