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  1. Self-Described Huguenot blargoe's Avatar
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    #26
    I am most fluent in Windows, but I can work in both.

    Yes, vi/vim is a bit of a learning curve for someone from a windows-only background.

    Find yourself a good vim cheat sheet, print it in poster form, and nail it to your cubicle wall.

    Get used to ESC to get back to command mode and the proper commands to exit with and without saving. Learn the copy/cut/paste commands and how to search. Then you will be able to function well enough to not be so frustrated, and will pick up more as you go along.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 3/22/2017 - Passed Microsoft 70-412; 2/11/2017 - Completed VCP6-DCV (passed 2V0-621)
    Working on: MCSA 2012 upgrade from 2003 (to heck with 2008!!), more Linux, AWS Solution Architect (Associate)
    Thinking about: VCP6-CMA, MCSA 2016, Python, VCAP6-DCD (for completing VCIX)
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  3. Senior Member
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    #27
    Why be scared, be curious instead!

    Linux is all about the Directory hierarchy. What types of files go into which directories. VIM get's easier the more you use it. I only dabble in linux stuff from time to time for work and fun and I feel pretty comfortable with it. All about the concepts. Once you go through installing services like ssh, editing the ssh related files, iptables, etc.. it should start to click and get easier
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  4. Member
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    #28

    Default exit vim

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  5. Senior Member LittleBIT's Avatar
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    #29
    Thanks TE for the input.

    It's not so much as 'scared' but more like overwhelmed.

    It's like anything else I suppose. Theres 1000 commands, but you'll probably only use a small % of those commands on a daily basis (ls & cd)

    I put the L+ on the side and moved onto LFCS. It seems more my speed, like actually DOING stuff, not just learning all the commands like grep and such.

    I can't recommend Linux Academy enough, it beats out Udemy for sure.

    I'm studying for the MCSA Linux on Azure study path.

    On a side note -- Azure portal is very similar to AWS's console, I was easily able to pick stuff up and compare apples to apples between the two.

    Happy to finally learn some new stuff, not just fixing printers and word documents having issues opening :P

    I am going to put the time in for VIM, just for my own growth.
    Kindly doing the needful
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  6. Senior Member DoubleNNs's Avatar
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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Krusader View Post
    I'd recommend using a Linux distro as your daily driver at home if you can and try and use the CLI as much as possible.
    Try Fedora if you are going for the RHCSA
    I don't really like Fedora. But I used CentOS 7 as my daily driver for over a year. And a MacBook at work.
    It's a lot easier, in my opinion, going back and forth between MacOS and Linux than Windows and Linux. However, that all might be different now that Win 10 has the Ubuntu subsystem.. installed.

    Even if you're going for the RHCSA eventually, don't be afraid to try out Ubuntu or Mint as your daily driver either -- they're both pretty neat. And Linux is Linux -- the concepts from one distro carry over to the next.
    Goals for 2017:
    RHCSA, RHCE, LFCS: Ubuntu | Project+ | AWS Certified DevOps Engineer | Learn Docker, Kubernetes, Prometheus, Golang | Improve Python Programming
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  7. Senior Member DoubleNNs's Avatar
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    #31
    Additionally, you should be able to learn Vim enough to be functional in under 10 minutes. And within an hour have memorized the key bindings you need the most.

    i = insert mode - you can now start typing your text
    ESC = get back to "normal" mode - you can now start entering commands, such as the following
    :w = write
    :q = quit
    :q! = quit w/o saving
    :wq = quit and save

    Eventually, you'll be able to search, jump to different places in the file, copy/cut and paste, highlight, search and replace, etc. Then if you want you'll be able to even make scripts/macros, edit multiple lines at once, split the window, jump between multiple lines, and create custom configurations for your vim environment. But almost all of that is secondary, and you can wait months, or even years before jumping into the more difficult parts.

    I always recommend nano/pico to those who use *nix occationally and vi to those who plan to be sys admins and constantly working within multiple systems. For programmers working within *nix but not necessarily jumping between many machines, I recommend looking into emacs at some point just to see if it's something they're interested in, tho it's not something I personally ever used.
    Goals for 2017:
    RHCSA, RHCE, LFCS: Ubuntu | Project+ | AWS Certified DevOps Engineer | Learn Docker, Kubernetes, Prometheus, Golang | Improve Python Programming
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  8. Junior Member
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    #32
    Sleep with photos of Linus Torvalds and Richard Stallman under your pillow

    After you learn Linux, bully Windows users since they are vermin who never seen a CLI in their lives or even understand how an OS functions
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  9. Senior Member LittleBIT's Avatar
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    #33
    Quote Originally Posted by technogoat View Post
    Sleep with photos of Linus Torvalds and Richard Stallman under your pillow

    After you learn Linux, bully Windows users since they are vermin who never seen a CLI in their lives or even understand how an OS functions
    This literally made me LOL.

    Every Linux person I've talked to had this boujee elitist attitude --- makes me want to be one of them haha.

    Since I'm updating; I've gotten through half of the LFCS course, it's been really fun and the CLI is getting easier to use. Downloaded a study guide with all the commands. It's really just repetition, repetition, repetition.

    I'm on my way!

    Can't wait to re-start my AWS training, but that's for another time.
    Kindly doing the needful
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  10. Junior Member
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    #34
    Sorry,

    already encountered Windows users who been with the OS for decades have no clue how to make a simple script to automate a repetitive task

    anyways,

    Why not pick a distro you think suits you and use it daily instead of Windows

    You can stick with one with GUI then day-by-day learn CLI

    slowly, you'll learn how Linux works and also make your own scripts

    it also will give you transitions skills with Power Shell
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  11. Senior Member LittleBIT's Avatar
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    #35
    Unfortunately where I am at, its all Windows. Whats even worse is I get 1 day off. Spend 12 hours a day at work. (Overseas contractor).

    Maybe once I return home and return to the land of fast internet, Ill use it more and more. Ive been using centos and ubunut server for labbing. Id use Ubuntu as an everyday, I actually did for a few months and just ran VMs for windows stuff. I liked Ubuntu. Maybe Ill compromise and just get a Mac, an elitist, above all.
    Kindly doing the needful
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  12. Self-Described Huguenot blargoe's Avatar
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    #36
    Quote Originally Posted by technogoat View Post
    Sleep with photos of Linus Torvalds and Richard Stallman under your pillow

    After you learn Linux, bully Windows users since they are vermin who never seen a CLI in their lives or even understand how an OS functions

    I have thankfully altered this perception at my workplace. We (as an industry) are still paying for the sins of the easy paper-MCSE path to a mid-senior level admin position that was so prevalent 15 years ago. These folks are now middle-aged wizard-clickers who somehow continue to survive and drive down expectations for the "Windows" skillset.

    Though, I would strongly advise anyone getting into IT administration or who has gotten into IT in the past 5 years to pick up both Windows and Linux basic operations skills, and become fluent in either on their path toward whatever specialization they choose.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 3/22/2017 - Passed Microsoft 70-412; 2/11/2017 - Completed VCP6-DCV (passed 2V0-621)
    Working on: MCSA 2012 upgrade from 2003 (to heck with 2008!!), more Linux, AWS Solution Architect (Associate)
    Thinking about: VCP6-CMA, MCSA 2016, Python, VCAP6-DCD (for completing VCIX)
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  13. Member Panther's Avatar
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    #37
    Nice! You can try to find out how to do these in Linux or Windows, goals in themselves.

    Add:
    Backups
    Disaster Recovery
    Anything else a company would do
    etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by phatrik View Post
    Personally I gave myself goals like:

    - Setup a webserver
    - Setup a webserver capable of virtual hosting
    - Learn how to setup an SSL certificate
    - Setup a mail server
    - Setup a mail server capable of doing virtual hosting
    - Use iptables (Back then it was ipchains) to share my highspeed internet connection with other computers (high speed internet was a new concept and fairly expensive, my dad was still on dialup until I decided I'd figure out how to share the connection)
    - setup a nameserver with reverse DNS for my local server (and the fake websites and e-mail domains)

    I never gave myself a goal of learning linux inside out.. instead I picked broader goals like webservers, mail servers, DNS servers and firewalls and everything else just kind of followed along. For me that was a lot more interesting than sitting there and thinking to myself "ok, now I have to learn all these shell commands" There's nothing wrong to use targeted learning for the stuff that doesn't fall within any of your broader goals (i.e: at some point I told myself it was time to learn about user management) but IMO giving yourself some sort of little project is a much more fun way to learn.

    Last but not least: avoid dual booting. If you don't have dedicated hardware then download VirtualBox and run some VMs, that way you get to keep your desktop and you can always refer to online information (google searches) when you're stuck.



    PS: As you've already said it yourself, everything is a text file. If you actually intend to work as a Linux admin, spend all the time you need to learn 'grep' and a little bit of 'awk'. You'll even want to look at Regex at some point. This will make your life much easier when it comes time to search log files for specific events/when troubleshooting.

    PPS: If you're learning Linux for work reasons, at least here in Canada, 99% of the job postings I've seen ask for RHEL or CentOS. Debian is great but it's rarely mentioned in any of the job postings I've ever come across. My recommendation is that you spend time learning CentOS. Also, don't waste too much time on CentOS 6, bite the bullet and move on to CentOS7/systemd.
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