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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Default New learning strategy

    This might be old news to you all, but I am a open to close guy. Meaning..... I like to start a book complete it before moving on to something else. I've been like this for as long as I can remember, recently through my own experiences I started to read a book and watch a cbt and research white pages in parallel and WOW it has made a big difference. Instead of getting hung up on a topic I do short sprints via reading, cbt and white pages and even practical application.

    This strategy has really worked well for me. I find myself staying more interested and getting less annoyed working multiple channels, not just one.

    After looking back on it, firing off a book and going open to close is a piss poor way of learning for me.

    Just thought I would share......
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  3. Senior Member stryder144's Avatar
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    #2
    I am starting to pay more attention to methods that have helped others increase their learning speed and comprehension. I might give this a go.
    The easiest thing to be in the world is you. The most difficult thing to be is what other people want you to be. Don't let them put you in that position. ~ Leo Buscaglia

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  4. California Kid JoJoCal19's Avatar
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    #3
    Ah yes, good to see someone else who has looked at moving to an agile way of tackling studying. I've started applying the agile methodology to other areas of my life. It seems to work well for someone with ADD like myself.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, GCIA, GSEC, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, BSBA - University of Florida, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: MS Cybersecurity, Learning Python
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    Reading:​ Python Crash Course
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  5. Surf Guitar Guy tedjames's Avatar
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    #4
    What works best for me is to outline the exam objectives in a spreadsheet with each domain on its own page. Then I study by domain, using multiple sources for each. Sometimes it's good to get several viewpoints on a subject. I make sure that I am clear on every point in the exam objectives before moving on.

    At least for me, reading a study guide or watching a video training course from start to finish is not effective when it comes to retention. If I read about a topic, then watch a video, then practice it, I'll retain more of a topic. And then when I move on to another domain, I'll continue to practice what I've learned in previous domains. Practice comes in the form of sample test questions, flash cards, simulations, a friend verbally quizzing me, etc.
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  6. Member
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    #5
    This has been my approach and has worked pretty well for me over the previous 12-18 months. Read, see and then do is a nice formula to cover all senses and help with memory retention.
    2017 Goals: 70-347[X], CCNA R&S [X], CCNA Security [X]
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  7. Senior Member
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    #6
    Great feedback

    The other piece of it, is having no expectations to learn anything. Instead enjoy the learning process and do what my mind guides me to do. If I feel like opening the book and I do that. Or if the kids are loud and I have 15 minutes to watch a 7 minute CBT before we leave I do that. It's embedded into my schedule.

    I've stop using the "study" place technique and have a book in the family room, laptop at the kitchen table and other instruments/tools in other places as well.

    It really has been an enjoyable process.
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  8. California Kid JoJoCal19's Avatar
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tedjames View Post
    What works best for me is to outline the exam objectives in a spreadsheet with each domain on its own page. Then I study by domain, using multiple sources for each. Sometimes it's good to get several viewpoints on a subject. I make sure that I am clear on every point in the exam objectives before moving on.

    At least for me, reading a study guide or watching a video training course from start to finish is not effective when it comes to retention. If I read about a topic, then watch a video, then practice it, I'll retain more of a topic. And then when I move on to another domain, I'll continue to practice what I've learned in previous domains. Practice comes in the form of sample test questions, flash cards, simulations, a friend verbally quizzing me, etc.
    These two are the best techniques that I've found. I too create a spreadsheet and break the training into domains. I also like making it into a checklist format so I can easily track what I've gone through. I'm a very hands-on, practical person. Reading books cover to cover and doing rote memorization is the worst for me. That's why after the PMP I'm done with pure pursuit of certs, and won't consider anything that isn't practical. Read, watch video, practice works best.



    Quote Originally Posted by DatabaseHead View Post
    Great feedback

    The other piece of it, is having no expectations to learn anything. Instead enjoy the learning process and do what my mind guides me to do. If I feel like opening the book and I do that. Or if the kids are loud and I have 15 minutes to watch a 7 minute CBT before we leave I do that. It's embedded into my schedule.

    I've stop using the "study" place technique and have a book in the family room, laptop at the kitchen table and other instruments/tools in other places as well.

    It really has been an enjoyable process.
    This so much!! After I'm done with the PMP I am DONE with studying for certs. I will be pursuing knowledge without the expectations of having a cert at the end. So while I would like to do stuff like the OSCP, I'm more about the journey and oh hey, I've gained enough knowledge to pass the exam as a result. These exams like the CISM, PMP, etc where I am solely trying to obtain the cert, are stressful. Like you, I want to fit in 5-10 minutes here or there to watch a video and obtain a nugget of information. But the main point is to no longer have the stress of trying to pass a cert exam.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, GCIA, GSEC, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, BSBA - University of Florida, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: MS Cybersecurity, Learning Python
    Next Up:​ None
    Reading:​ Python Crash Course
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  9. Senior Member
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    #8
    @JoJo

    I agree about the stress. Certifications rarely if ever completely align with my interest therefore I stop seeking them. It literally became impossible for me to even spend 1 minute going after them.

    It became a weird addiction with very little direction and almost no return.

    Showing up to work everyday and being super positive and continually learning through CBT's, Books and White Pages have given me way more knowledge.

    Again, not anti certs, in fact I tout the CCNA for anyone looking to get into IT, it is your best bang for the buck if you want to get into an intermediate role right away.
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  10. Member
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by DatabaseHead View Post
    Great feedback

    The other piece of it, is having no expectations to learn anything. Instead enjoy the learning process and do what my mind guides me to do. If I feel like opening the book and I do that. Or if the kids are loud and I have 15 minutes to watch a 7 minute CBT before we leave I do that. It's embedded into my schedule.

    I've stop using the "study" place technique and have a book in the family room, laptop at the kitchen table and other instruments/tools in other places as well.

    It really has been an enjoyable process.
    This is what I have found to work the best for me. I find it incredibly difficult to force myself to sit down in my office and block out an hour or two of study time. I leave my book by my chair in the living room. A couple times a week my wife enjoys a couple shows that I don't care to watch. I'll take that time to grab my book and get a chapter or section in, plug in the headphones and watch a video or two. This is indeed a great way to keep the process going and not feel so put off from studying.
    Currently studying for CCNA R&S
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  11. Senior Member
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    #10
    Been on a massive Jordan Peterson binge lately and reshaping my life and how I approach things. I've started studying hard again, and the advice here will likely be very profound.
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