Closed Thread
Page 5 of 5 First 12345
Results 101 to 110 of 110
  1. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    5,015
    #101
    Quote Originally Posted by networker050184 View Post
    Depends on if that company requires a degree or not. That guy with all the CCIEs might not even make it past a simple HR resume screen that checks for a degree.
    Wow.

    The way I view the cert/degree relationship is this:

    Degrees:
    Are found general, high-level, non-real world types of knowledge. Example: A person with a degree might know what the osi model is, and where a cisco router fits into the equation.

    Certifications:
    Are specific, low-level, "real world" (real word as the vender sees it) knowledge. Example:
    A person with a CCNA or CCXP should know the osi model, cisco model , how to enable protocols, at layers 1+2, security, etc.

    Now mind you I am after both and I am not against degrees nor am I saying people with degrees don't have real world knowledge.
    Wouldn't an HR person want someone with "real-world" knowledge?

  2. SS -->
  3. Went to the dark side.... Moderator networker050184's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    11,672

    Certifications
    CCNA, CCNP, CCIP, JNCIA-JUNOS, JNCIS-SP, JNCIP-SP, MCA200
    #102
    You are assuming this HR person knows anything about technology. They may just know that degrees are required period.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.

  4. Senior Member sidsanders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    214

    Certifications
    cne, mcse, scna, scsa, a+, net+, sec+
    #103
    Quote Originally Posted by knwminus View Post
    Wow.

    The way I view the cert/degree relationship is this:

    Degrees:
    Are found general, high-level, non-real world types of knowledge. Example: A person with a degree might know what the osi model is, and where a cisco router fits into the equation.

    Certifications:
    Are specific, low-level, "real world" (real word as the vender sees it) knowledge. Example:
    A person with a CCNA or CCXP should know the osi model, cisco model , how to enable protocols, at layers 1+2, security, etc.

    Now mind you I am after both and I am not against degrees nor am I saying people with degrees don't have real world knowledge.
    Wouldn't an HR person want someone with "real-world" knowledge?
    keep in mind that with so many folks getting certified, you have many folks who carry titles who havent touched the stuff in production support/deployment. the "correct" answer to me is get what you can. degree, cert, exp (winner!!), and anything else legit that will help.

    we interviewed several folks who had mcse, comptia certs, even ccnp for desktop positions. some had degrees. most were just entering the field. the person who won out had the most exp, and did the best in the int process.

    not directed at anyone: i hope this doesnt go the way of the itt/devry/uop thread... there is no one way to do this. we are tech folks. given the tools we have, how can we find all these diff solutions using various operating systems/hw/etc and cling to notions that only one way exists to make it in the tech world???

  5. Software Packaging Eng MrNetTek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    31

    Certifications
    Win 8, Server 2008, Win 7, CCNA, MCSE, MCSA, MCTS, A+, Network+, I-Net+, MCP, SQL Admin, Server+, Security+, CEH, MCDST, MCP 2003, BDD
    #104

    Default HR, Goals, and Newbies ohhh my!

    A HR person, an organization...they want it all. They want degreed, certified, letters of recommendation, professional grace, political diplomacy, hard skills, soft skills, extremely knowledgeable, flexible and cheap...you will most likely never live up to all their expectations. What you have to do is live up to your expectations. Make goals and accomplish them...have dreams and achieve them. No more, no less.
    If you’re the type of person who hates class rooms and long term goals…maybe certs are better for you, because you can reach shorter milestones quicker. If you’re the type of person who likes setting long term goals and working diligently towards the end, then a degree isn’t so bad. If you’re the type of person that doesn’t really know what they want to do, I recommend taking some time to figure it out. Life is way too short to stack up student loans against your credit, to waste time with certs in a field you may not even want to be in. Contrary to popular belief, IT isn’t an easy field. The people who have the knowledge don’t usually give it out so easily. The people who want the knowledge usually find it extremely difficult to get in.
    As far as the questions “Do nerds make better IT Professionals,” the answer is yes. Many times their knowledge is so extensive, it even amazes me. They are usually willing to make sacrifices that some of us may not make. Sacrifices like losing night after night of sleep, not spending time with friends and family, and the most important one-their health.
    My advice for all the newbies out there, stop expecting big money when you haven’t earned the experience for it. Ask any technical person, who has had 10 years or more experience, how easy it was at the beginning. Most of them have horror stories, certified and degreed alike. May the force be with you. MrNetTek (aka Eddie Jackson)

    Quote Originally Posted by knwminus View Post
    Wow.

    The way I view the cert/degree relationship is this:

    Degrees:
    Are found general, high-level, non-real world types of knowledge. Example: A person with a degree might know what the osi model is, and where a cisco router fits into the equation.

    Certifications:
    Are specific, low-level, "real world" (real word as the vender sees it) knowledge. Example:
    A person with a CCNA or CCXP should know the osi model, cisco model , how to enable protocols, at layers 1+2, security, etc.

    Now mind you I am after both and I am not against degrees nor am I saying people with degrees don't have real world knowledge.
    Wouldn't an HR person want someone with "real-world" knowledge?

  6. Cisco Moderator mikej412's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    10,190

    Certifications
    CCNP CCIP CCSP CCVP CCDP CCDA CCNA CS-CIPSS CS-CIPTDS CS-CIPTOS CS-CIPCSS CS-CFWS CS-CVPNS CS-CISecS ISSP 4013 4011
    #105
    Quote Originally Posted by knwminus View Post
    I don't want to thread jack but if you have a CCIE and that is not enough then wtf is?
    This is the "magic formula"
    Quote Originally Posted by JDMurray View Post
    (Experience + Certs + Education + Who you know) * Luck = really good career opportunity
    All those things combined may give you an opportunity -- but if you show up to a job interview smelling like an old sweat sock (or with the personality of a smelly old sweat sock) you can probably kiss that one specific opportunity goodbye.

  7. sporadic member shednik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    2,005

    Certifications
    CCNP, JNCIP-ENT, JNCIS-SP, JNCIA, JNCDA, CCNA, CCNA:Security, MCP, A+, N+, L+, MST:InfoSec, CNSS 4011-4015
    #106
    Quote Originally Posted by fleck View Post
    But it's all about needs and wants. I don't see the reason to get condescending over someone's dislike of college or lack of want to go to one. I've spent the last 9 years of my life avoiding a higher education, dammit, it's my legacy!
    The only reason I saw that you don't want to goto college is this below

    I hate NORMAL schools. Community colleges filled with cheerleaders and dumb little dipshiis and script kiddies. That's what I hate. I know that the tech school I'm going to is my kind of place, otherwise I wouldn't be going.
    I don't really want to say what that comment makes me think of your attitude and I'll leave it at that. I think thats a terrible excuse for not pursuing a degree. Like others have said its not something you would expect coming from an aspiring IT professional who says his soft skills are up to par. But whatever I'm done trying to give any advice to you about anything because you've shown over and over that your attitude is you're right and we're wrong. Not to be rude but it's funny you are trying to tell us what employers want when most of the people who gave you advice are already deep into the field. I think you should really want advice and thoughts before asking, that is why people gave you a bad rating. You have a bit of a I know it all attitude.

  8. Member fleck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tampa
    Posts
    85

    Certifications
    WIP: Network+
    #107
    All you did was judge me. Poorly. Plain and simple I think. Thanks.

  9. sporadic member shednik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    2,005

    Certifications
    CCNP, JNCIP-ENT, JNCIS-SP, JNCIA, JNCDA, CCNA, CCNA:Security, MCP, A+, N+, L+, MST:InfoSec, CNSS 4011-4015
    #108
    Quote Originally Posted by fleck View Post
    All you did was judge me. Poorly. Plain and simple I think. Thanks.
    You've pretty much bashed anyone's advice like I said there is a reason people told you why they thought you are making a mistake. Because they have been in the industry and you are just getting started.

  10. Member fleck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tampa
    Posts
    85

    Certifications
    WIP: Network+
    #109
    Quote Originally Posted by shednik View Post
    You've pretty much bashed anyone's advice like I said there is a reason people told you why they thought you are making a mistake. Because they have been in the industry and you are just getting started.
    Wrong. When people weren't bashing me for saying that I didn't like college, everything was fine. After that, I started receiving unsolicited and sometimes condescending advice. Most of you guys need to start paying better attention to the threads you're posting in, seriously.

  11. Cisco Moderator mikej412's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    10,190

    Certifications
    CCNP CCIP CCSP CCVP CCDP CCDA CCNA CS-CIPSS CS-CIPTDS CS-CIPTOS CS-CIPCSS CS-CFWS CS-CVPNS CS-CISecS ISSP 4013 4011
    #110
    Quote Originally Posted by fleck View Post
    After that, I started receiving unsolicited and sometimes condescending advice.
    Actually, I thought there was a BUNCH of GREAT advice posted in this thread.

Closed Thread
Page 5 of 5 First 12345

Social Networking & Bookmarks