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  1. Senior Member xenodamus's Avatar
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    #151
    Has anyone noticed that the MCITP:SA / MCSA:2008 no longer requires a client exam?

    This was of particular interest to me since my MCSA:2003 includes the XP exam. So, from what I see, I don't need to take the 70-680 to upgrade to MCSA:2008. Just the 648/646.
    CISSP | CCNA:R&S/Security | MCSA 2003 | A+ S+ | VCP6-DTM | CCA-V CCP-V
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    #152
    It never did in 2008. The MCITP:EA required a client exam. The MCITP:SA required the 70-640,642, and 646.
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  4. Senior Member xenodamus's Avatar
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    #153
    Interesting...I hadn't noticed that until now.

    So the MCITP:EA requires a client exam, but I can become an MCSA:2008 or MCSE:Cloud without it.
    CISSP | CCNA:R&S/Security | MCSA 2003 | A+ S+ | VCP6-DTM | CCA-V CCP-V
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  5. Self-Described Huguenot blargoe's Avatar
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    #154
    Only recently have job postings started stating "MCITP" as the standard Microsoft cert. I'm going to bet it will remain on job postings eve after it is phased out, just like MCSE was before it was phased out. So maybe to get past the letter filters, having some kind of MCITP would be beneficial. But given the info above, I'm 99% sure I'm not going to waste my time on the :EA.
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  6. PMP-Wannabe! erpadmin's Avatar
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    #155
    [QUOTE OF ENTIRE PRECEDING POST REMOVED]


    Since both the EA and SA give you the same cert now (MCSA:2K8 ), you pretty much will meet tour personal requirement of getting a MCITP, an MCSA and with two additional exams, an MCSE.

    All without a client exam to boot...(smh...)
    Last edited by Slowhand; 04-28-2012 at 07:41 PM.
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  7. Junior Member
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    #156
    I have been following the comments here MCSE: Reinvented for the Cloud

    from what I gather based on Ken Rosen's comments:

    - There will be no more product specific MCSE exams anymore (no MCSE Server 8 for example)
    - MCSE Exams are all cross-platform cloud certifications and they will require recertification (i think every 3 years?)
    - MCSA Level exams are product specific exams and do not require recertification
    - The path to the MCSE exams includes the MCSA exams, when you recertify at the MCSE level you are awarded the newest MCSA level exams in that path. (I guess the MCSE exams include that content?)
    - There are more MCSE level exams coming when the new version of server is released.
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  8. Drops by now and again astorrs's Avatar
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    #157
    Quote Originally Posted by JDMurray View Post
    Realize that the term "engineer" is very broad, like the terms "scientist," "technician," "programmer," and "developer." A "Microsoft engineer" isn't anything close in knowledge or occupation to a degreed engineer, but they both design and implement systems, which is what engineers do.
    Calling yourself an "Engineer" is restricted in a number of countries the same way Doctor, Lawyer, Architect, etc. are (though not in the USA) which is why they steered clear of it this time around.

    P.S. You guys realize this means we all get to be Minesweeper Consultant & Solitaire Experts again
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  9. Certification Invigilator Forum Admin JDMurray's Avatar
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    #158
    In the USA, the occupation "Engineer" once had a special meaning to the IRS for tax purposes, but I don't think it applies anymore.
    Last edited by JDMurray; 05-03-2012 at 07:14 PM.
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    #159
    I don't like being called an associate! I think the SQL 2012 exams are complicated. So I wish an ohter title than associate.
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  11. Senior Member Devilsbane's Avatar
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    #160
    It is very interesting indeed. I have a feeling that over time by listing MCSE on my resume potential employers will mistake it for the Solution Expert certification. It isn't lying to list it, but they might be disappointed with what they get.
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  12. Junior Starcraft Engineer
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    #161
    [QUOTE OF ENTIRE PRECEDING POST REMOVED]

    Perhaps it is not "lying", but in my opinion it would be inappropriate to list "MCSE" on a resume for anything except maybe NT. The correct certification title for MCSE on 2003 is "Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) on Windows Server 2003". Listing it as MCSE 2003 or MCSE on Windows Server 2003 is acceptable, but just plain MCSE is not because there is no such certification other than possibly the NT MCSE (I'm not sure if it was just called MCSE at the time). The 2000 and on MCSEs, including the current iteration, match a product. To have MCSE on NT, 2000, and 2003 is to have three different certs.

    In any case, anyone who is familiar with the certs will ask you at some point during the interview process. If the having the wrong version is a deal-breaker, it's your own time wasted.
    Last edited by Slowhand; 04-28-2012 at 07:41 PM.
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  13. PMP-Wannabe! erpadmin's Avatar
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    #162
    [QUOTE OF ENTIRE PRECEDING POST REMOVED]

    If I saw an "MCSE" from someone with just NT 4 "today" I would be completely underwhelmed and unimpressed. NT 4 was a completely different O/S than 2000+ (aside from AD). If an MCSE NT 4.0 claims he was still in the industry post NT 4, but was not certified, (if it were me) I'd be grilling him on 2000+ differences that are not found in NT (such as "run as" administrator, for example; something easy.)

    The fact is that HR filters are going to scan for MCSE, regardless of what it means. Microsoft spent so much time hyping up both the MCITP:EA and MCITP:SA that they not only abandoned those certs, but made them BOTH the same cert...with the EA being a bit more difficult to achieve than the SA. MS did this for the HR filtering so that folks can put MCSE on resumes and NOT lie. (So long as they write out the certification as well and list the technology.)

    It isn't so much lying as it is quasi-shady....not really shady, but not really on the up-and-up either.
    Last edited by Slowhand; 04-28-2012 at 07:42 PM.
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  14. Senior Member
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    #163
    Quote Originally Posted by joshmadakor View Post
    There must have been a reason for this. I'd like to think that M$ isn't the type to just "do stuff" without thinking about it.
    Really?? lol
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    #164
    So what does everyone recommend for someone just getting started down the microsoft path?

    I am about half way through my 70-680 studies but kind of lost on where to go after that. I will still be sitting the 70-680. I was originally planning on the MCITP-EA but sounds like that might be pointless with the change? Any recommendations? Basically looking for certifications to help with a System Administrator role.
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  16. Member
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    #165
    I didn't read the entire thread. But I do recall taking this survey for Microsoft because of MCP status.

    They had a ton of questions about this entire subject. I told them the old way was best, apparently more people
    felt the titles worked, but the names sucked I guess.

    Whatever. If it = $$$ then I don't care if they call them "Monkey Pig Dog Computer Face Bonk"

    Frankly MCSE = Microsoft Corp Systems Engineer made the most sense to me. Maybe I'm just old school in thinking.

    P.S. - lol cloud everything, cloud certs, in the cloud, protected by the cloud, so you can re-cloudifycert every 3 years.
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