+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 25 of 45
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    75

    Certifications
    WGU BS in IT:NDM, VCPv5, VCPv4, MCITP: SA, MCSE 2003:S, MCSA 2003:M, MCTS 70-351, 70-652, CCENT, CCNA, CCNA: Security; Network+, A+, WIP: RHCSA
    #1

    Default Studying while at work?

    What are your thoughts on studyingwhile at work? For the purposes of this question let's assume thatyou're sticking to material that is directly relevant to your org.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS -->
  3. Chasing down my dreams. Chitownjedi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Censored Ave
    Posts
    557
    #2
    All day every day!..

    In seriousness. My last 3 contracts, they've had no issue with me using downtime to learn about stuff. Each place i've asked my direct manager, as well as got a feel from my contemporary's and in each case studying was the least of their worries.. some people were doing stuff that were a lot less "acceptable" with downtime.. like leaving for 3 hours at a time, or watching movies with their feet up.... and the work still got done.. so the best people to ask are those who you might report to and your co-workers... a lot of time they will let you know the unwritten rules of a place if you are new..

    But just in response of feeling comfortable in doing it while on clock.... man, maximize your time every way you can. If they have no problem with it, and it don't hurt your work, don't feel bad at all.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. Senior Member chrisone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    1,569

    Certifications
    SilentBreakSecurity - DarkSideOps, CISSP, CCDP, CCNP R/S, CCNP Security (Secure, FW) , C|EH , PA ACE
    #3
    +1 All day every day!

    Anyone discouraging you to become a better/smarter and efficient worker is jealous and is afraid of your success. F*#K them!
    2017 Goals: Dark Side OPS: Custom Pentesting (complete), eCPPT (in progress), LFCS (in progress), OSCP
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    924

    Certifications
    BA: MIS, MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support 7, MCSA Windows 7 Configuration, VCP5, ITIL V3 Foundation, AWS Technical Professional
    #4
    I've never been in an environment where there is true downtime since there are always ongoing projects to work on, upgrades to be planned, ect.

    I just can't really justify in my mind not starting on a project to study or not looking ahead at what needs to be done next. I have a hard time finding how everyone seems to have so much downtime.

    I usually end up studying on breaks, lunch and sometimes stay late to read a chapter or two of something.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Senior Member nosoup4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    360

    Certifications
    VCP-DCV/DT, VCAP-DCD, MCITP, MCSE
    #5
    All day, erry' day!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    69

    Certifications
    MCTS 70-681, 70-659. ITIL Foundation
    #6
    I wish I worked in an environment where it were possible; unfortunately I have to answer the phone when it rings, which means I am being constantly interrupted. I would definitely take advantage of being able to study while at work if it were possible.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    483

    Certifications
    A+, Network+, MCP, CCNA, CCNA:Voice, CCDA, CCDP, CCNP R/S, JNCIA, JNCIS
    #7
    I used to when my NOC shifts were on the weekends back in the day. Nowaday's there's no way I could find enough downtime to get any decent studying in.
    My Cisco Blog Adventure: http://shawnmoorecisco.blogspot.com/

    Don't Forget to Add me on LinkedIn!
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/shawnrmoore
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  9. Senior Member lunchbox67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    128

    Certifications
    CCA (1YO-A23), Network+, Security+, CSA+
    #8
    If I had a lot of free time to study I would not feel very comfortable in my position being around much longer. I know I would not feel the need or want to pay someone to do nothing.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  10. Senior Member broli720's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Merica
    Posts
    377

    Certifications
    CISSP, CCNA, CCNA:S
    #9
    +1 All day every day!

    At this phase in our project that's all I really do. Picked up python and C in the last two months because of it hahaha
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  11. Network Consultant FloOz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    1,588

    Certifications
    B.S. CSIT; CompTIA A+, Network+; CCNA, DA; CCNP R&S; CCDP
    #10
    I have a hard time focusing at work but I do try to lab in packet tracer as much as I can. I also pick the brains of some of the network engineers if I am ever stumped on a topic.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  12. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    693

    Certifications
    CCENT, Microsoft Cert Specialist: 74-409, MCITP:EA/MCSA:2008, MCSA:Win8.1/Win7, MCSE:Sec.2003, MCTS(x4); A+('07), Sec+ ('08)
    #11
    I will join this party! Oh yeah all day every day!

    I have dead times at various points during the day and I take advantage as much as I can!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  13. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    2,043

    Certifications
    None?
    #12
    Direct studying? No.

    But I make a direct connection to what ever I am doing. E.g. I installed a bunch of MySQL servers a few months ago. So I used it as an excuse to take a company sponsored SQL class and an 12 hour online class in MySQL class.

    Basically if you have to X amount of work, extend it by 20-30%. I find this SAVES a lot of time in the long run. Because most training etc includes pitfalls and warnings.

    I tend to use the table of contents of many books as guides for my documentation as well. So if you can connect it directly with what you are doing you'll get double the benefit out of it.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  14. Network Security tpatt100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Ypsilanti, MI
    Posts
    2,881

    Certifications
    CISA, CISSP, GIAC G2700, CEH, CHFI, Security+, CCENT, N+, A+
    #13
    I do probably 90 percent of my schoolwork and cert studying at work...
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  15. Senior Member broli720's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Merica
    Posts
    377

    Certifications
    CISSP, CCNA, CCNA:S
    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by tpatt100 View Post
    I do probably 90 percent of my schoolwork and cert studying at work...

    Me too man. Me too hahaha
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  16. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dunedin
    Posts
    177

    Certifications
    BSc Majoring in Networks and Security, National Diploma in ICT, CCENT, CCNA, CCNA:S, ITIL:F
    #15
    +1. At the end of the day if you are "Learning" and it's going to improve your performance at work later on down the track I don't see why you shouldn't be allowed.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  17. Irate End User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    483

    Certifications
    A+, MCP, MCTS: Win7 Config, MS: Win7 Config
    #16
    Before I got into IT I studied for my A+ on my lunch breaks only at work. When I worked at a super busy helpdesk I tried studying in between calls and on breaks/lunch but wasn't successful with that at all. I'd like to give studying another try at my current new job but it's so busy and I feel like I'm learning a lot just by doing my daily work that I don't even bother. Though that being said I will be taking some CCNA classes for fun but that's not at work though.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  18. Senior Member YFZblu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,423

    Certifications
    A+, N+, S+, CCNA, CCNA:Sec, GSEC, GCIH, GCFE
    #17
    In my current position I have a significant amount of downtime, and I do use it to study.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  19. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    5,652

    Certifications
    eCPPT, GPEN, GWAPT, GCIH, CISSP, CCNA (expired), MCTS
    #18
    Whenever I get the chance. However, I find it very difficult to focus enough to read. I can go through Boson practice tests and use GNS3 without any trouble though.
    Currently working on: Resting
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  20. Senior Member Mike-Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,848

    Certifications
    CISSP, HDI-SCA, ITIL V3 Foundations, A+, Network+, Security+, MCP, MCDST, CCENT, CCNA, Project+, CCNA Security, MCTS: Windows 7 Config, CEH, CHFI
    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by YFZblu View Post
    In my current position I have a significant amount of downtime, and I do use it to study.
    same boat here....


    I'm more or less a network monitor, and things are pretty slow on the night shift, so there is a ton of downtime to kill
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  21. Senior Member olaHalo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    736
    #20
    i study more at work then i work at work
    however i have a laid back job, just answering phones and simple website updates
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  22. No Sleep For The Wicked CISPhD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    114

    Certifications
    MCP, CISSP, CISM, MISM, MBA, ABD, and a bunch of other educational junk...
    #21
    I work as a manager within my department. When I'm budgeting for the following year's financial and personnel requirements, I include a 15% buffer in all projects for the assumption that at least 1 hour of my staff's day (NOT their lunch) should be dedicated to their professional career advancement. Whether it is to study more about what they are working on now, or to study what they want to be "when they grow up". Assigning my engineers time to study with on the job training is an investment in their ability, and subsequently an investment in my company. Employees who are engaged and learning new materials are happy employees. Happy employees stick around longer. The longer an employee sticks around, the less money I have to commit to employee turnover, spin up, rebuilding lost "tribal" knowledge, etc... I think you can see where I'm headed with this.

    If you don't have an opportunity to study FREQUENTLY... you're employer isn't really invested in you. That being said, if your employer isn't invested in you, and you aren't happy doing what you're doing... Then why the heck are you still sitting in that chair?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  23. nel
    nel is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    2,847

    Certifications
    A+ , Network+, MCSA 2003, CCENT, CCNA, CCDA, CCNP, CCDP, JNCIA-JunOS, JNCIS-ENT, Bsc(hons) & Msc Degree
    #22
    Quote Originally Posted by CISPhD View Post
    I work as a manager within my department. When I'm budgeting for the following year's financial and personnel requirements, I include a 15% buffer in all projects for the assumption that at least 1 hour of my staff's day (NOT their lunch) should be dedicated to their professional career advancement. Whether it is to study more about what they are working on now, or to study what they want to be "when they grow up". Assigning my engineers time to study with on the job training is an investment in their ability, and subsequently an investment in my company. Employees who are engaged and learning new materials are happy employees. Happy employees stick around longer. The longer an employee sticks around, the less money I have to commit to employee turnover, spin up, rebuilding lost "tribal" knowledge, etc... I think you can see where I'm headed with this.

    If you don't have an opportunity to study FREQUENTLY... you're employer isn't really invested in you. That being said, if your employer isn't invested in you, and you aren't happy doing what you're doing... Then why the heck are you still sitting in that chair?
    wow, i never knew you guys existed
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  24. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,666

    Certifications
    MCSE: Security, MCTS x 5, P+, S+, N+, A+, HIT
    #23
    Quote Originally Posted by YFZblu View Post
    In my current position I have a significant amount of downtime, and I do use it to study.
    Me too. Taking a break right now from KET1. Can't say I'm a fan of Java.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  25. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    25

    Certifications
    A+, N+, S+, P+, CIW Web Foundations, MS MTA: OS Fundamentals, CCENT
    #24
    As a business owner I'd say study as long as there is no work to be done. But make sure your employer is alright with it first.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  26. Senior Member W Stewart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    786

    Certifications
    Bachelor of Science IT - Security, CCNA Security, CCNA R&S, LPIC-1, A+ Net+ Sec+, Linux+ and others I don't feel are worth mentioning
    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by CISPhD View Post
    I work as a manager within my department. When I'm budgeting for the following year's financial and personnel requirements, I include a 15% buffer in all projects for the assumption that at least 1 hour of my staff's day (NOT their lunch) should be dedicated to their professional career advancement. Whether it is to study more about what they are working on now, or to study what they want to be "when they grow up". Assigning my engineers time to study with on the job training is an investment in their ability, and subsequently an investment in my company. Employees who are engaged and learning new materials are happy employees. Happy employees stick around longer. The longer an employee sticks around, the less money I have to commit to employee turnover, spin up, rebuilding lost "tribal" knowledge, etc... I think you can see where I'm headed with this.

    If you don't have an opportunity to study FREQUENTLY... you're employer isn't really invested in you. That being said, if your employer isn't invested in you, and you aren't happy doing what you're doing... Then why the heck are you still sitting in that chair?

    You sir are a competent manager. Very hard to come by but businesses either run well or run into the ground based on decisions you make. Not enough employers are willing to invest in their employees these days but I'm lucky enough to finally be working at a job that does so another +1 for studying at work. I've learned so many little details about linux that I may not have wasted time learning before but it has only made me better at my job.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Social Networking & Bookmarks