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  1. Junior Member Registered Member
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    Jan 2018
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    #1

    Default Self Employed CISSP Work Requirement

    I've been in IT for the last 15 years, working for myself as an independent contractor, with my own company. I have worked for everyone from large AT&T vendors to Insurance offices with hundreds of employees to home users. Some weeks, I've worked 80 hours, others, 5. I have experience building Windows and Linux servers from scratch, physically securing them and continuing their maintenance, for years, afterwards, configuring firewalls, tracking down hackers, setting up vpns, configuring routers, but does that qualify as "full time" according to ISC? I would not say, I've worked 40 hours a week for the same client, but I've worked 40 hours a week, for myself, for sure.
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  3. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #2
    Does anyone know?
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  4. They are watching you NetworkNewb's Avatar
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    Feb 2015
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    Off the grid
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    A+/Net+/Sec+, CCENT, CCNA:Sec, CCSK, GCIH
    #3
    I would say those duties are definitely part of your full-time job. Just cause you don't do those thing every minute doesn't mean they don't qualify. imo I would say you're safe.
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  5. Member
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    Dec 2015
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    Monterrey, Mexico
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    CCNA Cyber Ops, COBIT5 Foundation, CSA+, CSSLP, CISM, CISSP-ISSMP, CEH, ITILv3 Foundations
    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by NetworkNewb View Post
    I would say those duties are definitely part of your full-time job. Just cause you don't do those thing every minute doesn't mean they don't qualify. imo I would say you're safe.
    I would agree that it qualifies, is there someone that can confirm all those years of work?

    Because when your endorser calls someone has to be able to confirm it.

    When I got my CISSP the endorsement still included a copy of my resume with contact information for my previous experience, him checking my college degree and my endorser made comments about checking the validity of my claims. Big pile of paper scanned and signed by me and him. I also called my previous bosses to let them know that my friend could call/email them to check on my experience.

    A friend of mine got audited by the PMI (I know different process) and had to submit signed letters from bosses or clients that confirmed his experience.


    Cheers,
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  6. Junior Member
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    Dec 2016
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    MCSE (NT4, 2003, 2012) Network+, A+, C|EHv9, Security+
    #5
    I passed the CEH and today I completed Security+.

    Next on my list is CISSP and I am in the exact same situation as the OP.

    This next exam is going to be hard lol
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  7. Junior Member Registered Member
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    Jan 2018
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    #6
    I can definitely refer them to some of my clients that I've worked for. They can at least verify I've worked for them, in a contract capacity.
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  8. Member
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    70

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    CISSP
    #7
    The easiest option is to contact ISC and ask them direct. As far as I know there is no reason that would bar you from certifying but ultimately they are the ones who can give you a definitive answer. Good luck and let us know how you get on.
    CCNA - expired
    CISSP - live n' kickin'
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