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  1. BS:ITSec, MS:ISA
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    #1

    Default Capitol Technical University Doctorate

    I just got accepted into their Doctor of Science Cybersecurity degree, has anyone else taken this program before? It looks to be fairly recent (2014?) and I've read great things about their MSIA program.. I'm just unsure about how this will look with WGU for my bachelor+master and then Capitol Technical for doctorate.
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  3. Senior Member BerkshireHerd's Avatar
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    #2
    The accreditation seems ok, the question would be why do you think you need a doctorate? No Offense , but with the education section of your resume reading they way yours will I would not be impressed..

    Are you hoping to work in Academia? Do you think you will earn respect receiving the doctorate? Focusing on and finishing your CCIE would be far more impressive to me.

    Just my honest opinion.
    Information Security Analyst // B.A - Marshall University 2005
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  4. BS:ITSec, MS:ISA
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    #3
    I picked that school because of the proximity to Washington D.C., ultimately I'd like to be a senior/manager security analyst, and eventually lead to a CISO role. I know the doctorate doesn't exactly put me there but I feel that if it can assist where it claims to then it can help immensely. Currently I work in Security Operations for a fortune 500 company and I've only got about 5-6 months experience in the security field, so this degree (and keeping my current job) would give me 4 years experience in the security field with my CISSP, CISM, ITIL, CHFI/CEH (even though they don't mean much) I could hope to get out of the Operations part of the Security field and into designing the policies, working with a big picture type role in a company.

    "When they graduate, doctoral students will be able to conduct research as a foundation for executive action, demonstrate innovation and creativity as it relates to the strategic performance of an agency or organization, make innovative and practical contributions to the IA body of knowledge, and apply a local, national, and global perspective to the decision-making process. DSc graduates can expect to be hired into senior leadership positions in industry, government and academia, and will be able to create and manage unique solutions for any information assurance challenges that may arise. They will be well prepared to lead local, national or global organizations in IT-related fields and provide expert guidance for the protection of information assets."


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  5. Senior Member
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    #4
    I'm not one to typically tell someone to skip education. But, with 5-6 months in security, you already have a BS and a masters in the subject along with a whole pile of related certs, at least one of which would imply you have more security related experience than you do have. With that in mind I'd really focus on your current job and trying to learn the day to day skills to excel at that, not push towards an almost unheard of level of education in security right away.

    A few years from now? Maybe if you really think it would help, but if I was picking someone for a high level management role in security I'd pick someone with 10+ years in the field and proven management skills vs someone who stockpiled schools. Just my 2 cents of course, but I did recently help hire a Security Manager / Sr Architect and he had 30 years in the field, a CS degree from before when some of the staff were born and tons of proven experience and leadership.
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  6. BS:ITSec, MS:ISA
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    #5
    Thanks, the reason I'm looking at it is because my work would pay for it, I've been getting certs pretty consistently I just want something that could help push me over the hump into getting into higher levels, I know experience will help and I was hoping that keeping my current job for 3-4 years picking up the doctorate may just intrigue enough to get that higher level position over others who may only have a masters or 10+ years experience.
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  7. Member
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by nelson8403 View Post
    I know experience will help and I was hoping that keeping my current job for 3-4 years picking up the doctorate may just intrigue enough to get that higher level position over others who may only have a masters or 10+ years experience.
    It wont, unless you are going into academia, no one cares about a doctorate. When I look for work I leave it off my resume. I am in the program now and do NOT recommend it, it is HORRIBLY ran. If I could drop out and get all my money back, I would in a heartbeat.


    Quote Originally Posted by nelson8403 View Post
    "When they graduate, doctoral students will be able to conduct research as a foundation for executive action, demonstrate innovation and creativity as it relates to the strategic performance of an agency or organization, make innovative and practical contributions to the IA body of knowledge, and apply a local, national, and global perspective to the decision-making process. DSc graduates can expect to be hired into senior leadership positions in industry, government and academia, and will be able to create and manage unique solutions for any information assurance challenges that may arise. They will be well prepared to lead local, national or global organizations in IT-related fields and provide expert guidance for the protection of information assets."
    This is a line of pure marketing garbage in no way shape or form based on reality, Capitol faculty even admits it.
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  8. Senior Member
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    #7
    I would say D.O.D. or academia would look for a Phd.

    To make GS-14/15 and then move onto Senior Executive Service they typically require a PhD.
    OTOH, for a CISO or VP they usually look for 5 years in InfoSec management or more.
    At that point you might as well gun for CIO.
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  9. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #8
    I went to Capitol for my MSIA and it was a really good program, all the teachers were really great. I thought the proctored tests were a little odd but completed it none-the-less. However, I opted to go to Nova Southeastern to continue my pursuit of a PhD because they offered a PhD and not a DSc. Yet, all a PhD really proves to anyone is that you can do research. Which is something that I'm really interested in so that made sense for me to pursue.
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  10. Junior Member
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    #9
    I know this thread hasn't been very active but I have the same questions and figured I would ask here. I am finishing my Masters of Science in IT Management from WGU in May and am thinking about moving towards a doctoral degree. I like research and I also would like to eventually be in a place where I can be a technical advisor ( 5+ years from now). Hopefully I can be in the GS-15 or so ranks and the CIO of a part of the DOD or a Director of Security somewhere. I am lacking in certificates but am working slowly on them. Here is a little background for me to kind of give you an idea of where I am at.

    I have been in security for about 3 years now. I have the Security + and Splunk PowerUser certificates. I will be working on the CASP and possibly the CISSP here soon. I have a BS in Cybersecurity and will soon have an MS in IT Management. I am also working on a Grad Certificate from PennState and should finish that by December of 2017. I am under 25 and am looking to increase my education and my work experience simultaneously.

    Capitol Technical University's Doctoral program based on advertising seems decent. Around $47,000 total spread across 3 years. The rate of return would be great in my case because all I would need to do is get a job or a pay raise of at least 16k for 3 years to make that money back. I am not looking for a payday right away and honestly breaking even is fine with me as long as the degree adds value. I am in the GS ranks so that would help me move up. Being under 25 with a doctorates degree could give me more value overall than someone in there 30's or so.

    What do you think? Is the time, effort, and money worth a doctorates degree?
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  11. Senior Member aspiringsoul's Avatar
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    #10
    My honest opinion is this.

    If you have a passion for research, and you strongly desire to work in Academia at some point, then I would consider pursuing a PHD.

    However, if your career goal is to become a CISO in the private sector, then I don't see how a PHD will benefit you in that endeavor any more than 10+ years of experience and your MS:ISA.

    Personally, I just graduated from WGU with the MS:ISA, and I am considering going back to WGU for the MBA: IT Management degree (or another regionally accredited MBA with an Information Systems focus). The reason that I am considering going back to school for an MBA is that I feel that having a business degree (MBA) and a technical degree (MS:ISA) will make me a strong candidate for a CIO position after I have 15 to 20 years of experience, so hopefully I can achieve the CISO or CIO position by the time that I'm in my late 40s, early 50s.

    Don't let me or anyone else dissuade you from pursuing your goals, but I think you should consider the opportunity cost by pursuing the PHD program, and if your time would be best utilized by pursuing other personal goals (certifications, skill development, spend time with family, etc.)

    Regardless of what you decide, I wish you the best of luck in your journey.
    Education: MS-Information Security and Assurance from Western Governors University, BS-Business Information Systems from Indiana Wesleyan University, AAS-Computer Network Systems - ITT Tech,
    Working on: CISSP
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  12. Senior Member TranceSoulBrother's Avatar
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    #11
    After reading many threads about doctorates and investigating the opportunity myself, I've come to a couple of thoughts: no one can tell you whether to pursue a doctorate or not. That should be a personal decision. Second, and based on the first thought, the issue should be seeking advice about the proper venue to seek your degree.
    I personally looked at Capitol and decided to steer away from it. It was advised by DC people because of its proximity to the power hub and variety of degrees, but it just looked to me like a glorified version of ITT Tech (a votech school that took some steps to become a "university")
    There are some threads here that listed other alternatives like Dakota State, Indiana State, Capella...
    I personally don't buy the "IT people don't need a PhD to get to the top". There are various ways to get to the top, and many waypoints along the way. Just because the majority don't have a degree and still make it to midlevel on experience and certs doesn't make it an axiom to operate your life and career.
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  13. Senior Member
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    #12
    Deciding on a Doctorate or Ph.D. is a question of where you want to go in life. Most of the jobs I am working require a minimum of a Masters degree. A Ph.D. comes in handy when you are wanting to move up in cyber security. I can already teach undergrad with my Master's degree a Doctorate or Ph.D. lets you teach at the Masters level. The rule is one degree below your degree is what you are allowed to teach by most accreditors. However, academia is not where it is at. Very few jobs that are hard to get. However, if you are going to be presenting to C levels and want to work heavily in management the Ph.D. or Doctorate is a bonus and can get you some recognition. So go for being Dr. Nelson8403 and let people refer to you as Dr. Nelson8403. Today Dr. Nelson8403 will be presenting on how the company can do XYZ better. Sounds good right?
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  14. Senior Member cyberguypr's Avatar
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    #13
    I have been accepted into this program and am currently debating if I want to start in May or August. Most likely August as I bought a car I'm prepping for shows and want to enjoy it for a few months. Anyway, I digress.

    Worth the effort and money? Only you can answer that. In my case the main reason I'm pursuing the DSc is simple: ticking off a box for a personal goal. Yes, it cost a lot of money, but the psychological effect and personal satisfaction of achieving this degree supersedes any ROI discussions. I look at it from Maslow's self-actualization perspective: enjoying the journey, self-growth, fulfillment of potential, etc. A secondary factor that influenced my decision is that I am in an environment where advanced education is highly valued. Since I see myself spending some good years here and escalating the management ladder, the degree will definitely be an asset. Finally, I want to leave the door open for an academic role in the later stages of my career.

    To sum up, talk to your inner self, make sure you understand why you are doing it, and be clear on what you expect to get out of it.
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  15. Senior Member
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    #14
    If you've only got 5-6 months of experience in the security field, how do you hold a CISSP?
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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by TranceSoulBrother View Post
    I personally looked at Capitol...
    ...but it just looked to me like a glorified version of ITT Tech (a votech school that took some steps to become a "university")
    , yeah Capitol is right alongside for-profits and votech. Meanwhile they were good enough to partner with NASA for quite some time:

    During the 10-years of SOI, Capitol students have worked with NASA on the missions: Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), Tropical Rainforest Measurement Mission (TRMM) and Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). Additionally, several students have been certified by NASA for mission planning, and satellite command and control, which are certification programs that are typically completed by college graduates.
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  17. Senior Member
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    #16
    Best response IMO and sums up why I will also be pursuing a DSc, likely from Capitol as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by cyberguypr View Post
    I have been accepted into this program and am currently debating if I want to start in May or August. Most likely August as I bought a car I'm prepping for shows and want to enjoy it for a few months. Anyway, I digress.

    Worth the effort and money? Only you can answer that. In my case the main reason I'm pursuing the DSc is simple: ticking off a box for a personal goal. Yes, it cost a lot of money, but the psychological effect and personal satisfaction of achieving this degree supersedes any ROI discussions. I look at it from Maslow's self-actualization perspective: enjoying the journey, self-growth, fulfillment of potential, etc. A secondary factor that influenced my decision is that I am in an environment where advanced education is highly valued. Since I see myself spending some good years here and escalating the management ladder, the degree will definitely be an asset. Finally, I want to leave the door open for an academic role in the later stages of my career.

    To sum up, talk to your inner self, make sure you understand why you are doing it, and be clear on what you expect to get out of it.
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  18. Junior Member
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    #17
    Allow me to chime in here as "Professor" VV5.

    For those that may or may not know already, I have a PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering. I did a ton of research and published in peer-reviewed journals, which is a requirement and essentially comprises your dissertation. While I am not knocking the online way of getting them since some of you have careers established whereas I went the grad student slave route (and thus had my graduate school paid for), I will point out that those of you (not those in the current post, but those that have this line of thinking) who are contemplating a "get-a-doctorate-quick" scheme are going to end up being disappointed a bit. And here's why.

    I've seen the posts elsewhere outside of TE where degrees are offered from U. Phoenix and the like. But before you plunk down your hard earned money, you need to ask if that paper that you are going to earn from said university is going to carry any weight, and I'm talking advancement opportunities and career positions. For example, I can tell you straight up that if I was going for a tenure track faculty position at some university and was pitted against a U. Phoenix graduate with a PhD - I'm personally going to get that position hands down. Not trying to be cocky, but that's just how it is. I know all universities are big business and diploma mills, but the for-profit ones seem to be the worst offenders imho. It's about credibility when you get to that point.

    I do like with cyberguypr posted - and partially admit that's why I did my PhD. But again, please also consider where you want to also go with that degree.

    Feel free to PM me with questions.

    VV5 out.
    Last edited by VictorVictor5; 03-03-2017 at 07:11 PM.
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