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  1. Member
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    #26
    OK, so what you can do is get an empty computer case with the side panel off and put it under a desk. Then lay on the floor with one hand inside the case, holding a tablet so you can study, and have a screwdriver or something in your other hand so you look busy. Easy money.

    In all seriousness, I relate to your frustrations. IT is a highly proactive field, but your ability to be proactive is influenced greatly by your environment and management. The worst environments are those that always want you to look busy but don't allow you authority to actually make any changes or be proactive. It sounds like that's what you're caught in. It can be discouraging when management shoots down/has no interest in any change/improvement you propose. On one hand, you want to show value, on the other hand you're not allowed the resources to do it.

    Unfortunately, the best you can do in those kinds of situations is just try to get out and move to a better job/company (often easier said than done, I know). You want to be in an environment that will either A) keep you busy with real work, B) let you study on your down time, C) let you be proactive, listen to your ideas, and give you the resources to implement them (difficult to find in entry-level). If you can't get at least one of those three, then your environment sucks and it's time to get out.
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    #27
    Quote Originally Posted by GSXR750K2 View Post
    If true, then that should be an indicator to bounce, as it will be a while before you get enough experience to surpass him, so you'll be under him the whole time and it doesn't sound like you think he has a lot to offer if you aren't actively learning from him..
    Yea, there is no surpassing him. He's at the top.

    Quote Originally Posted by blatini View Post
    It is odd that your job would get on you for studying, but I think you're a bit overeager and not allocating that energy properly. Like other people said take time out of your real life to study. Also what exactly are you doing to look busy when there is nothing happening? Reading technet, cisco or any other site will help you in your studies.
    It isn't about not having enough free time in my off-time to study. It's about reading in these forums about all this downtime and being surprised that you guys are allowed to read/study in your downtime. I really can't be at my desk during downtime.

    What I am supposed to do, is roam the campus/classes, looking for issues - since every student has a campus issued laptop.


    Quote Originally Posted by sillymcnasty View Post
    Also, this will probably sound offensive, but you sound a little whiny. If you don't push yourself, nobody will. Listen to audio of IT courses on your commute if anything!
    Missing the point of this thread. It isn't about studying in my free/off time. It's about too much downtime. Now if I am gone from desk, no one will question what or where I was doing. (Being gone for five hours - don't hear a peep from anyone )
    Being at my desk, I'm checked on every 5 seconds - while he mumbles 'What to Do, What to Do (Even though I'm working on something)

    Quote Originally Posted by scenicroute View Post

    Unfortunately, the best you can do in those kinds of situations is just try to get out and move to a better job/company (often easier said than done, I know). You want to be in an environment that will either A) keep you busy with real work, B) let you study on your down time, C) let you be proactive, listen to your ideas, and give you the resources to implement them (difficult to find in entry-level). If you can't get at least one of those three, then your environment sucks and it's time to get out.
    All I could do was laugh when I read this...because this is the epitome of what I was wanting, when I switched fields.
    You understand where I am coming from....
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  4. Senior Member
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    #28
    Yeah I will say that being forced to roam campus is really weird and counter productive. I would look to get another job because that is definitely not indicative of what the majority of IT jobs are. Maybe during all that roaming you could do some phone interviews and get a feel for what's out there.
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  5. Senior Member MontagueVandervort's Avatar
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    #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Daneil3144 View Post
    I currently work at a school (IT department of two), where I periodically get calls, roam the school, interact with the students, hands on with WAPs, servers, punching wires, break/fix issues, etc.
    I haven't read through all the replies here. Don't have time (sorry), but I think I'm probably going to go with something different than I've seen so far.

    This is the exact same thing I did on my last "job" (which was only work-study, but this is exactly what I was doing.) I loved interacting with the students and faculty, but the IT department was a whole other story. This is a really bad first image of IT because most of the people who work in these depts as I've noticed are just there because of who they know and not what they know. It's a big crapfest of "you pretend you're something and I'll let it go if you pretend I know something too" and mostly everbody there is just stagnant in their learning and knowledge levels and has just about zero drive.

    Really bad first image of IT. I love Tech, but that atmosphere was even starting to turn me off.

    You say you keep finding yourself on Indeed. Ok so go with that. If you're really this unhappy then look for something else that you'll feel more able to grow in...

    BUT and here's the big part. I think you're too picky for a nube on the types of jobs you'll take. Come down a bit on that just for a while at least. I read through your post, and all I saw was "I declined" this and "I refuse to do" that. It's not looking so good right now in the "do what you have to do to get your foot in the door" process for you. I think in the beginning we're mostly stuck in the help desk or call center types of positions.

    And really - nobody is going to push you. You have to push yourself. It has to be by you - for you.
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  6. Queen Bee kiki162's Avatar
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    #30
    Clearly your strategy isn't working well, so you will need to change a few thing to get you going in a better direction. A lot of the ppl on here have the drive and make the time to get to that next level. You have a lot of downtime at work, so use that to your advantage. It shouldn't be an issue to study on something that's job related. You are relying on your school training to get your certs, and you should try and break away from that. If you need to go back to another job to make more money in the meantime then DO that. Although you really don't know WHAT you want to do, figure out what you enjoy first. Do you like system administration, or do you like network admin stuff more? Once you figure that out, then find a better school that will provide you with some of the basic skills needed.

    There's a lot of people that deal with Criminal Justice and IT in forensics. I know a few people that have their degrees in digital forensics, and I can tell you that both system administration and networking experience will be useful. Get the basics down first, because you can use that anywhere, then go for the more specialty areas of IT to build on it.
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  7. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #31
    Reality is that if part of your job is maintaining/deploying/administrate a network you will always have things to improve, fix, reconfigure, etc,etc

    It goes from network diagrams , running cables, mount equipment, configuration and so on.

    Same thing applies with servers.....

    You learn valuable skills every step of the way.

    I study for a CCNA cert on my off-work time.

    What I did was talk with one guy at the IT department ( thats you in your case, so you can skip that) and started helping him with network diagrams (logical and physical). Then replaced some switches around the office with cisco switches and configured those to fit the actual network ( i bought the switches on ebay).

    Then the guy saw that I was useful and let me contribute bit by bit. Now I have access to fiddle with most things according to my skills level and I have a small practice lab at work. If Im sitting at my desk hitting the keyboard with a console opened who is gonna say anything about it.

    And last but not least
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  8. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #32
    (Sorry, my post was cut off short, here is the rest)

    I will consider it a luxury if you even have time to "really, really" study at work.


    IT is problem solving for the most part.........so you have to find a solution, compromise or maybe move on.


    English is my 2nd language so bare with me please.


    Good luck!!!
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  9. user.Status = "Learning";
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    #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Daneil3144 View Post
    Yea, there is no surpassing him. He's at the top.
    You need to broaden your view of the situation.

    If he's been doing the same thing for 20 years, there's a lot he doesn't know as he's siloed himself into his role. By surpassing his knowledge you'll be in a better position to get into other opportunities, and if you want to stay there, you can show that the student has become the master. Some companies tolerate people who don't expand their learning because they are very good at something. Get just as good and more and you may be viewed as a more useful resource.

    As a starting point, try to learn as much as you can from him. There's no such thing as a bad learning experience.
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  10. Senior Member alias454's Avatar
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    #34
    Since you are required to round with your users, maybe you can listen to podcasts during the day. As far as trying to circumvent the system you are in, I think your energy would be better spent finding another place to work. Since you have a decent paying job now, take your time and be picky about it. Do you get summers off or is this year round full-time work?
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    #35
    First work is for work. Dont always except to study at work. 2nd if you dont like the job find something else. 3 those CompTIA certs should relate to what your doing at work. It shouldn't take long to to finish up those CompTIA certs since you are in the field now. Prioritize your life and goals.
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  12. Senior Member
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    #36
    One last question instead of starting another thread....

    When submitting my resume while currently looking; should I exclude my current job off my resume if I have only been here for 3-4 months and make it seem like I'm still at my previous job?
    Like 'inadvertently' give them an old resume.

    I've read threads where people say to exclude short time positions.
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  13. user.Status = "Learning";
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    #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Daneil3144 View Post
    One last question instead of starting another thread....

    When submitting my resume while currently looking; should I exclude my current job off my resume if I have only been here for 3-4 months and make it seem like I'm still at my previous job?
    Like 'inadvertently' give them an old resume.

    I've read threads where people say to exclude short time positions.
    Depends...do you want to potentially get caught lying, making that the first impression the new company makes of you?

    Excluding a short gig is one thing, saying you still work somewhere you don't is another. An employment verification can turn that opportunity into a bust.
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  14. Reticulating splines... iBrokeIT's Avatar
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    #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Daneil3144 View Post
    Like 'inadvertently' give them an old resume.
    Would it be okay for an employer do something similar and 'inadvertently' give you a different position and a lower salary after you start?
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  15. /threadkiller ande0255's Avatar
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    #39
    You have to go through help desk / contract position purgatory unless you know someone who has an in for you, that is just the way it goes, IT is not an easy field to just break into.

    It took me 6 years from earning my CCNA to getting a Network Role at a company, the rest was spent doing contract jobs, that basically all amounted to help desk.

    Best of luck in whatever you choose to do!
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  16. Senior Member
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    #40
    Quote Originally Posted by GSXR750K2 View Post
    Depends...do you want to potentially get caught lying, making that the first impression the new company makes of you?

    Excluding a short gig is one thing, saying you still work somewhere you don't is another. An employment verification can turn that opportunity into a bust.

    I'm confused.

    How is this any different than omitting a current employer? Not to mention it makes you look unemployed.
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  17. Senior Member
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    #41
    Quote Originally Posted by GSXR750K2 View Post
    You need to broaden your view of the situation.

    If he's been doing the same thing for 20 years, there's a lot he doesn't know as he's siloed himself into his role. By surpassing his knowledge you'll be in a better position to get into other opportunities, and if you want to stay there, you can show that the student has become the master.
    It's funny, some times I will ask him things, in regards to process or procedures that need to happen, per conference calls..

    And he'll give a vague/general response, with that he 'normally handles it,'

    ...any-who time to update the resume
    Last edited by Daneil3144; 05-17-2017 at 02:49 PM.
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  18. Senior Member
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    #42
    Come back to this thread...and Think god, has it already been a year at this place?
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  19. Junior Member
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    #43
    So where are you now? Still in help desk or you already moved forward?
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  20. Junior Member
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    #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Daneil3144 View Post
    Come back to this thread...and Think god, has it already been a year at this place?
    So where are you now? Still in help desk or you already moved forward?
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  21. Senior Member cyberguypr's Avatar
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    #45
    Yeah, update please.
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  22. Senior Member
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    #46
    I refuse to go back to a call center.
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  23. Senior Member
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    #47
    Quote Originally Posted by pirlo21 View Post
    So where are you now? Still in help desk or you already moved forward?
    Quote Originally Posted by cyberguypr View Post
    Yeah, update please.
    Still here - recruiters reach out but phone calls end early when I tell them I make $19 an hour with opportunity for overtime on an entry level job....
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  24. Junior Member
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    #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Daneil3144 View Post
    Still here - recruiters reach out but phone calls end early when I tell them I make $19 an hour with opportunity for overtime on an entry level job....
    Recruiters are not the way to go. Polish and put up a good resume on indeed and look for the position you want to apply for. I get call from recruiters all the time offering me good salary and everything but just for 2 -3 months, they just want their comission, you gotta do the work, not let the recruiters hunt you.
    Also I would recommend you to start looking into CCNA, if you want to apply for higher opportunities, start taking CCNA classes in some community college or tech school, so that will bring attention to your potential employer on your resume. Do you have a lab at home? Build your own lab and start practicing with windows server, cisco routers, etc.
    Most likely a CCNA will open you the doors to the $20+ or $30+/hr, you just gotta put work. I honestly think you are relying yourself too much on recruiters, if you start looking by yourself you can find some good job offers. Good luck.
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  25. Senior Member
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    #49
    Quote Originally Posted by pirlo21 View Post
    Recruiters are not the way to go. Polish and put up a good resume on indeed and look for the position you want to apply for. I get call from recruiters all the time offering me good salary and everything but just for 2 -3 months, they just want their comission, you gotta do the work, not let the recruiters hunt you.
    Also I would recommend you to start looking into CCNA, if you want to apply for higher opportunities, start taking CCNA classes in some community college or tech school, so that will bring attention to your potential employer on your resume. Do you have a lab at home? Build your own lab and start practicing with windows server, cisco routers, etc.
    Most likely a CCNA will open you the doors to the $20+ or $30+/hr, you just gotta put work. I honestly think you are relying yourself too much on recruiters, if you start looking by yourself you can find some good job offers. Good luck.

    No I've went to a few interviews - but the pay is less or the opportunities are slim in terms of moving up. (They let me know up front)

    Not going to lie - I've looked at CCNA certification. I think more doors will open with this.

    This is my goal for 2018.
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  26. Senior Member
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    #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Daneil3144 View Post
    No I've went to a few interviews - but the pay is less ...
    I'm not suggesting you take a pay cut simply to move but sometimes you have to take a step or two backward in order to move a lot more forward. Back when the dot-com boom went bust, if I had held onto my old salary as the benchmark someone had to meet, I would still be unemployed. Instead, I took a pay cut. It didn't take long to make it up and now I'm in the right spot to move to an extremely highly-compensated role in a year or three. Keep your eye on the prize, whatever that is to you and don't be afraid to say "oops, this is a better path."
    2018: CCIE Written (R/S) (done - Jan), CCIE R/S
    After that: MBA, OSCP
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