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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Default Interviewing with a hiring manager who used to work with your current boss

    Anyone ever deal with this? Normally, one would expect a level of confidentiality, but I've heard stories about the hiring manager leaking that info and getting back to the employee's current boss.
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  3. Senior Member yoba222's Avatar
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    #2
    So you're saying you want to go for this interview but you don't want your current employer learning that you are going for an interview elsewhere?
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    #3
    Yeah pretty much. Really just testing the waters a little (who doesn't). I'm actually really happy at my current job, just thought I would see what these guys have to say and determine if it might be a good fit. Normally, I don't get concerned with this stuff, but when they know each other from a previous working relationship it raises some flags.
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  5. Senior Member UncleB's Avatar
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by ITSec14 View Post
    I've heard stories about the hiring manager leaking that info and getting back to the employee's current boss.
    That normally happens - it's called asking for a reference LOL.

    Seriously though, it is probably just what you said - stories.

    If you are concerned, ask the hiring manager not to contact your current manager until reference stage. Have a good reason ready if they ask why (if you are only testing the water then you are wasting the hiring managers time so it needs to be a convincing reason).

    If you are just a time waster and really annoy the hiring manager then they could just do it out of spite, but it could almost be considered to be deserved
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  6. Senior Member IronmanX's Avatar
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    #5
    I guess normally this happens when they are doing back ground checks and by that point the job is pretty much yours and you are wanting to move forward with the new position.

    However in this case if the manager knows people at your current place of work there is not much that can be done.
    Usually places wont bother doing background checks until its the last step in hiring process and at that point it really doesn't matter what your current employer says. I think all they want from your current employer is too know that you do work there and for how long.

    I mean if the current employer gave you a glowing reference i would take that as a sign that they want you to get the job and move on which probably means your not very good haha

    I think you should not say anything and let it play out.
    The hiring manager should be aware that if they are not hiring you telling your current place of work you interviewed there is not going to be good for you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleB View Post
    That normally happens - it's called asking for a reference LOL.

    Seriously though, it is probably just what you said - stories.

    If you are concerned, ask the hiring manager not to contact your current manager until reference stage. Have a good reason ready if they ask why (if you are only testing the water then you are wasting the hiring managers time so it needs to be a convincing reason).

    If you are just a time waster and really annoy the hiring manager then they could just do it out of spite, but it could almost be considered to be deserved
    Nothing wrong with putting some feelers out there to see if another job would be a good fit. It's not wasting the hiring managers time if I feel like it's not, or they don't agree to the pay what I originally asked for during the HR screening. I would think that hiring managers respect a level of privacy when it comes to this stuff, regardless of who they know. But hey, I've been surprised before.
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  8. Self-Described Huguenot blargoe's Avatar
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    #7
    I have been cold-contacted by recruiters for Sr. positions at a large, well-paying company several times that I might have willing to at least have a conversation about. However, I work for the person that used to the director over that team at that company. I know for a fact, as soon as they saw the name of my current company, my boss would get a call within 10 minutes. They are still pretty tight. If it looked like a substantially better situation, I would probably have pursued an interview anyway, but for something lateral, not worth the awkwardness.
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  9. Senior Member LordQarlyn's Avatar
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    #8
    I don't blame you there, at one company when the program manager found out I was interviewing for jobs, he wanted to fire me. His logic was, anyone looking for another job doesn't want to work at their current job. Rather ridiculous because most people at the least take a peek what's out there, I bet even he did. Keep in mind, I didn't gripe, I didn't spread negativity, and I did my job well. Luckily my immediate supervisor called that BS because he knew I was doing well. I ended up finding another job anyway and leaving.
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    #9
    If this were at all true or even being suspected as being true I'd be checking sites like Glassdoor.com for similar experiences. If this situation did come to pass I would seriously trash the organization on every review site I could find. Not for vengeance but hopefully to prevent the next person from getting burned by a bad business practice.

    Really? If this is a concern why would you consider working with these people in the first place?

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    #10
    It's not that anything HAS been said, I was really just asking to see if anyone else has had that paranoia before. I honestly had no intentions on looking for any other opportunities, but this one popped up and I decided to go for it. It could definitely propel my career if it works out, so I guess it's worth the risk.

    IT is especially one of those areas where it's common for people to bounce around more often. Managers shouldn't really act so surprised. We all want better opportunities and more money, but sometimes we just run out of patience and can't deal with the 2-3% pay increases each year. That's an entirely different discussion though.
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by LordQarlyn View Post
    I don't blame you there, at one company when the program manager found out I was interviewing for jobs, he wanted to fire me. His logic was, anyone looking for another job doesn't want to work at their current job. Rather ridiculous because most people at the least take a peek what's out there, I bet even he did. Keep in mind, I didn't gripe, I didn't spread negativity, and I did my job well. Luckily my immediate supervisor called that BS because he knew I was doing well. I ended up finding another job anyway and leaving.

    It's so crappy how companies want to terminate people just for keeping an open mind for their career. They should make every attempt to keep those employee's, unless they are poor performers of course. Turnover is more costly than trying to give them a pay bump to stay.
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  13. Senior Member UncleB's Avatar
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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ITSec14 View Post
    It's so crappy how companies want to terminate people just for keeping an open mind for their career. They should make every attempt to keep those employee's, unless they are poor performers of course. Turnover is more costly than trying to give them a pay bump to stay.
    Actually it isn't surprising that the managers don't want people to stay who are not invested in the job and seem to be looking for something better. They will probably jump when the right job comes along so why invest in someone who seems to have one foot out the door already.

    I don't think it is worth while trying too hard to keep the employees who are in this state if the options available for development & growth where they are aren't enough for them. Sure it is worth having the conversation with them and maybe try to get them something in the way of more project work, a pay bump if they are really good but much better to back those who are worthy yet are still loyal.

    This is me looking at it from a managers point of view. Most roles out there have hundreds of applicants for most positions so while it is a pain and expense to recruit anew, it is much better than sticking my neck out to keep a malcontent who will probably leave anyway. Plus new blood is cheaper, brings new ideas and motivation and is probably going to come with the skill set I want.

    I really hate whiners who think the company owes them job satisfaction and giving them bonuses on a plate just to stop them going - you have to make this work internally in the company and if it doesn't work then suck it up or move on - managers don't owe you happiness. Some of us are good and some are bad, just like employees so life sometimes sucks - deal with it.
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  14. Senior Member IronmanX's Avatar
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    #13
    Quote Originally Posted by UncleB View Post
    Actually it isn't surprising that the managers don't want people to stay who are not invested in the job and seem to be looking for something better. They will probably jump when the right job comes along so why invest in someone who seems to have one foot out the door already.

    I don't think it is worth while trying too hard to keep the employees who are in this state if the options available for development & growth where they are aren't enough for them. Sure it is worth having the conversation with them and maybe try to get them something in the way of more project work, a pay bump if they are really good but much better to back those who are worthy yet are still loyal.

    This is me looking at it from a managers point of view. Most roles out there have hundreds of applicants for most positions so while it is a pain and expense to recruit anew, it is much better than sticking my neck out to keep a malcontent who will probably leave anyway. Plus new blood is cheaper, brings new ideas and motivation and is probably going to come with the skill set I want.

    I really hate whiners who think the company owes them job satisfaction and giving them bonuses on a plate just to stop them going - you have to make this work internally in the company and if it doesn't work then suck it up or move on - managers don't owe you happiness. Some of us are good and some are bad, just like employees so life sometimes sucks - deal with it.
    "Plus new blood is cheaper, brings new ideas and motivation and is probably going to come with the skill set I want."

    Yikes I guess things are really different across the pond.
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  15. Senior Member
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    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by UncleB;1116631}
    I really hate whiners who think the company owes them job satisfaction and giving them bonuses on a plate just to stop them going - you have to make this work internally in the company and if it doesn't work then suck it up or move on - managers don't owe you happiness. Some of us are good and some are bad, just like employees so life sometimes sucks - deal with it.

    Oh please, managers can't act like they never explore other options either. That's so hypocritical. I understand there is an element of loyalty in a job, but at the end of the day my family, financial situation and career growth are my priorities. If an employer isn't doing enough to help me advance my career, then I will absolutely be out the door. It's a two way street. Nobody expects bonuses or massive salaries, but hard work should be recognized and companies should do more to help their people advance.
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