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  1. Senior Member scaredoftests's Avatar
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    #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Moon Child View Post
    Lol that is actually funny the way you put it and your right and do have a good point. That actually helps me a little reading that thank you.

    I just will see homeless people on the streets with no job and begging for food and I have a terrible fear of that happening to me. I will get bad nightmares about being homeless one day, wake up in night sweats. I have always had a job my entire adult life, never been unemployed, got a lot refrence letters from past employers and teachers I worked with, but still it is an awful fear I have.

    I just feel the way to guarantee never getting homeless or unemployed is to be trained in so many different jobs that it will never happen to me. I do feel stupid sometimes I scored a 110 on IQ tests in middle school and was told had dyslexia as a kid , got only a 24 on ACT and like a 1050 on SAT so I feel really sensitive about that, but I guess that isn't so bad.

    I have no problem landing interviews it's just when people see me in person... barely over 5' foot tall and have a hard time finding a suit that fits me properly for Interviews they don't hire me because of how small I am. Had 5 teaching interviews in 2 weeks and an interview with Comcast before left trucking and went back to old computer job. Comcast said I passed an online logic assessment test did well on it and invited me to an in-person interview for a Network/ cable installer position with Comcast, but flubbed up that interview they never called back.
    What in the world does your height have to do with anything? I am 4'8". It is all in the attitude. You are creating so many obstacles for yourself.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
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    #52
    In Moonchild's weakest of weak defense I can understand part of the problem being a reflection of location. Two clues here: IvyTech (https://www.ivytech.edu/) and Chicago Heights reference puts OP in an economically suppressed area of the country not far from Chicago, Ft. Wayne and basically Northwest Indiana. A place where positions are sparse and cheap jobs are plentiful.

    Of course having traveled through the Northern prairie of Indiana I can only but wonder why anyone settled there outside of farming a century ago. People tend to float from one job to another in many of the rural communities. I understand it. I grew up in one as well and plan to retire in one years from now.

    MC you are reading much of the commentary correctly from the forum of over-certification achievers -find a vocation and stick with it.

    - b/eads
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    #53
    I live in a rust belt state. It's tough. Getting a decent job isn't about what "credentials" or degrees you have or even your experience, it's who you know.

    I used to work for a local but large copier sales/service company as a CSR. They had the service contracts for the School District and local govt machines. It's amazing how so many (most) of the last names in the higher positions are the same. It's very incestuous.
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  5. Senior Member Queue's Avatar
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    #54
    I did what your doing for a while, I was never successful. As soon as I picked IT and worked on my career, everything fell in place. I tripled my highest previous income in less than 3 years. I expect it to quadruple from that point in the next couple years. You have to stick with something. If you want to live a bunch of different roles play the Sims or something.

    Start listening to yourself. You know your wife doesn't want the trucking driving, therefore move past it. Stop mentioning it. I don't understand why you wasted time getting a CDL knowing that you wouldn't be able to work in the profession.

    There will always be some unskilled role that if everything goes south you will be able to make a basic income.
    Last edited by Queue; 11-20-2017 at 07:06 PM.
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    #55
    Maybe pitch a tv show idea to a major network..."The 365 Job Man"...a show where you change jobs every day for a year. If Honey Boo Boo had a show, I'm sure you can do it.
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    #56
    I get the indecisiveness. I started off college getting into Welding because I took shop once and thought it might be cool. It was less cool nearing the end of it and by the time I got my Associate's I was convinced that I didn't want to do this 8 hours a day. Then I tried Accounting and came to the same conclusion, but my realization was a bit quicker after 2 semesters.

    After that I switched to IT, studied for 3 years, and after my internship I did find that I could easily do this 8 hours a day with no problem.

    But having had more job experience than I, shouldn't you be able to point to something and say "that's what I want to do for the rest of my life"? I can rank my past jobs in order of preference. The unpaid internship still ranks higher to me than my $16/hr retail job.

    I believe dyslexia may be a hurdle if you want to get into programming, do work involving command lines, reading data, etc. Though if you can study for and pass A+, Net+, Security+ then it evidently might not be true in your case.

    I'm not married, but your wife's response should rule out trucking.


    My dream job would be to be a video game programmer(as any juvenile dream job goes), but I'm not willing to move to California(too many laws, taxes, regulations IMO). I believe I have an aptitude for programming given that I cobbled together a Sudoku generator in my first class. But since I didn't take Comp Sci as a major instead of IT(my mistake), I'm not willing to move to the hot spot for programming jobs, and it's not practical to go back to school, I've decided that elsewhere in IT is the way to go. Namely InfoSec given the numerous military bases around here. It's also rather future-proof since it's rare to outsource security clearances.

    You kind of have to give up what's ideal for what's practical. You also have to kind of know what the next step is and how to get there as others have said. Help desk is entry level unless you're applying to Tier 2 or higher. It's just to give you some money and some requisite experience while you study for and take a higher level cert so you can move up and instead of being the guy who talks to the customers first, you can get the more privileged position of being that other guy the customer might get transferred to if they get past the help desk.

    You do seem like you expect maximum pay right off the bat, but I guess I can understand that if you're 39 and can't afford to work your way up from the bottom. That having been said, it seems like you should just stick to what you know and build on that.

    Trucking sounds like your best source of immediate income, but I can't imagine 20+ years of experience trucking will get you a lot of promotions and pay raises. I find it hard to imagine that 2 years of cumulative experience in IT can't qualify you for something higher than Help Desk with your CIS degree. Sounds like you need to pick a specialization be it networking or programming and stick to it, aggressively gather certifications, seek relevant work, chase promotions. If there is a particular downside to the IT world though, it does seem to be that you do spend a lot of time chasing down and renewing certs throughout your career.
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    #57
    Quote Originally Posted by scaredoftests View Post
    What in the world does your height have to do with anything? I am 4'8". It is all in the attitude. You are creating so many obstacles for yourself.
    True that. I knew a military guy who was short(shorter than me at 5'4"), but he was so padded with muscle that he left no doubt in my mind that he could easily take on people who were 6 feet tall.
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  9. Senior Member Moon Child's Avatar
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    #58
    Quote Originally Posted by scaredoftests View Post
    What in the world does your height have to do with anything? I am 4'8". It is all in the attitude. You are creating so many obstacles for yourself.
    So glad to hear that if your short and you can make it, I should't be thinking my height is the main obstacle. I just think of 'Heightism' discrimination and the research that shows shorter guys often getting less job offers and money regardless of their education level.

    I probably will work on CCENT and study for the middle school math licensure. Looked at the math test I need to take to be licensed also be a middle school math teacher, it is really easy and I might as well take and pass it if it wouldn't take me long to do. In my state once you get a teaching license you can easily get licensed in another subject area by just passing a test. about 200 job openings for SPED teachers in my state but many want you be licensed also like in middle school math or another area so might as well do that if it is an easy test to pass.
    ... the world seems full of good men--even if there are monsters in it. - Bram Stoker, Dracula
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  10. Senior Member scaredoftests's Avatar
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    #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Moon Child View Post
    So glad to hear that if your short and you can make it, I should't be thinking my height is the main obstacle. I just think of 'Heightism' discrimination and the research that shows shorter guys often getting less job offers and money regardless of their education level.

    I probably will work on CCENT and study for the middle school math licensure. Looked at the math test I need to take to be licensed also be a middle school math teacher, it is really easy and I might as well take and pass it if it wouldn't take me long to do. In my state once you get a teaching license you can easily get licensed in another subject area by just passing a test. about 200 job openings for SPED teachers in my state but many want you be licensed also like in middle school math or another area so might as well do that if it is an easy test to pass.
    I beg to differ (I am a woman), though I see plenty of guys at work that are the same height as you and they are just fine. Like I said, stop throwing obstacles along your path.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
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    #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Moon Child View Post
    I probably will work on CCENT and study for the middle school math licensure...about 200 job openings for SPED teachers in my state but many want you be licensed also like in middle school math or another area so might as well do that if it is an easy test to pass.
    So you plan on teaching Cisco to Special Ed. math students
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    #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Moon Child View Post
    So glad to hear that if your short and you can make it, I should't be thinking my height is the main obstacle. I just think of 'Heightism' discrimination and the research that shows shorter guys often getting less job offers and money regardless of their education level.

    I probably will work on CCENT and study for the middle school math licensure. Looked at the math test I need to take to be licensed also be a middle school math teacher, it is really easy and I might as well take and pass it if it wouldn't take me long to do. In my state once you get a teaching license you can easily get licensed in another subject area by just passing a test. about 200 job openings for SPED teachers in my state but many want you be licensed also like in middle school math or another area so might as well do that if it is an easy test to pass.
    Here we go again.
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  13. Senior Member Moon Child's Avatar
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    #62
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFORCE View Post
    Here we go again.
    NO I am staying in IT field getting CCENT and then CCNA. I just got a teaching license and it would be so easy for me to take the math test to be licensed to teach middle school math is so easy to pass I figure might as well take the test for the fun of it. Compared to the CCENT and the CCNA the math test is a cake walk. I haven't taken any math in 15 years took a practice test on the state website to be licensed for middle school math scored an 80% without even studying yet. Very easy basic algebra and geometry. I mean we are talking about really easy math questions that most 6th graders could easily solve. 3x +2 = 17... what is X? lol. I could probably pass the license test to be middle school math teacher in like 2 weeks, the CCENT at least 3 months of studying the CCNA probably like 6 lol.

    The middle school science test to be licensed to teach middle school science looks pretty easy too. Very basic stuff, very easy questions. My biology and chemistry classes I took before I switched from biology to a CIS major were hell compared to what they want you to know for this test lol.
    Last edited by Moon Child; 11-24-2017 at 12:38 AM.
    ... the world seems full of good men--even if there are monsters in it. - Bram Stoker, Dracula
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    #63
    Some might say it wasn't even necessary to bring up the math test if you aren't going to use it and it has nothing to do with IT or you getting an IT job.

    I mean I could bring up how much I like riding my Honda CB300F somewhere in a thread I created asking about the C|EH, but it would be completely out of place.
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  15. Senior Member scaredoftests's Avatar
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    #64
    I am so confused. perhaps more coffee...
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
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    #65
    I should be studying but I can't stop reading Moon Child's post.
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    #66
    Quote Originally Posted by ttn022191 View Post
    I should be studying but I can't stop reading Moon Child's post.
    What are you studying?

    Moonchild's posts are interesting and I highly doubt it's a "tr011" post. The reason to their issue is "uncertainty", they are overly cautious of every situation. He's in better shoes than some people I know (at least he's got the M.Ed/BS CIS and is employed). I know some people in way worse of a situation than he is. In fact, I was one person going in all directions as I didn't know what to do or specialize in! I am at least a year OLDER than he is and finally got my act together a few years ago.

    *sigh* It all started two years ago, I made up my mind to finish a goal of getting a degree after taking an 8 day vacation in Hawaii with my wife and kids (daughter/son). And this year, after 20+ years since HS graduation, I finally finished that elusive BSBA General Management/CIS degree. When I was in HS/College, I took EVERYTHING - from Arts/Science, to Business/Computers, to Several Trades without getting a diploma or degree, I dropped out of college, applied to an institute of technology, and dropped out again. Went to private schools, the school closed down while I was going for my internet/networking diploma.

    I went onto Cleveland Institute of Electronics for a Nationally Accredited Associates in CIS and EET at the same time, 18 out of 40 courses were completed, they lost accreditation. I went to JIU (Jones International University), they closed down while I was enrolled in a Business Certificate program! I spent so much money on all my courses at the local college, institutes and at these online/distance education courses and was so frustrated as nothing got me closer to a job offer. At that time, I was devastated and was in debt (credit card/school loans, etc). I finally took a leap of faith and pinpointed what I wanted to do from all the courses/studying I've done (computers, as I use one at home).

    I took training at the local institute again for A+/Net+, after I passed their program, I was about to actually go for the certification but was hired! I was estatic, I worked there for a year - it was mainly for a system sales/repair service role of computers, the wholesaler from where we get the components saw that I was a hard working individual and asked if I wanted to join their company. For a slight raise, I worked there for 1 year as well.

    During that time, I was sending out resumes for better jobs - got hired for 3 of them, on the same day, I had to call two to cancel and picked the "best offer" and have been with them for 7.5 years, I didn't want to leave as I was getting $36k/year as help desk tech, at the last year/pinacle of my stay, I made $45k doing some sales of products as well. My ex-coworkers kept asking me to leave the joint as there were "better" fishes in the sea - they recommended me as they call me a "machine", I get things done quickly and properly, I said no a few times, until I had enough of nagging and did a calculation.

    The new jobs (2 of them) were paying about 15K extra with better everything, such as benefits/vacation - if I stayed, it would take 20 years to catch up to the current pay grade, I applied to both and got hired... finally decided to go with the Technical Analyst one that has a Union instead of the Medical Imaging/System Admin role. I have been with them for 9 years and now working as a Senior Technical Analyst and with all the OT, I made 76K two years ago, 84K last year, 92K right now (may hit 95K by year end).

    During my 7.5 years, I never took any benefits/tuition assistance or certification exams even though they were paid for. I was a "role model employee" and everyone thought I was a lifer at that company, I even had perfect attendance for the first two years until they decided to remove the "two days extra pay for perfect attendance". At the new company, 9 years now, I just started to use my benefits as my family requires them, I have gone for many free certs that they provide internally for training, but they don't provide any tuition assistance.

    I paid off my degree with the money I saved working all these years. I know the direction I want and will work in getting more Business Certifications such as Six Sigma/ITIL and IT Certifications in my specialty (CASP/CISSP), not something out of those fields. In order to play it forward, I have helped other get their degrees and provide free advice by volunteering my time. MY RECOMMENDATION FOR MOONCHILD: Find out what you want, since it's IT - go for vendor neutral certifications from COMPTIA, such as going for Security+,CASP and then decide if you want to go for Cisco/Microsoft or other certifications.

    I hope you find your calling, it's great you want to go get "knowledge" in so many different fields, but it's not needed. I was a major in EVERYTHING back then in college/institute, but couldn't even get anywhere as I had no degree or experience. Work your way up, start small, and show everyone you excel at your job, ask for temp assignments in higher positions. You stay in IT if you want, just find that specialization. Peace out...
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    #67
    The above poster gets it, he woke up and decided to focus. His focus led him to making big bucks by making tactical small steps in between. The way we have recommended in this thread over and over and how all of us have experienced.
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