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  1. Senior Member
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    #26
    Some great conversation going on here.

    Quote Originally Posted by denis92 View Post
    I was wondering if system administration is going to have a good future(as well as system engineering), since that is the route I would like to take? There are way more jobs in NY for system administration and engineering then network administration and engineering. With the cloud and all will responsibilities of the cloud shift to system administrators and engineers or how is that going to work?
    Just to clarify we need to breakdown the cloud definitions a bit...the cloud providers offer services (IaaS/PaaS/SaaS/XaaS). With IaaS and PaaS offerings (think AWS, Azure, GCP), they don't manage the guest OS. IaaS providers provide the hardware infrastructure and scalability but does not replace the daily sys admin activities. Companies relying on these cloud services still have to manage the OS and the rest of the stack and therefore sys admins are very much needed. With SaaS the SaaS provider provides the system administration and as companies continue their cloud adoption the sys admin jobs may migrate to the SaaS providers rather than the consumers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nisseki View Post
    Does network engineering have a good future? Just curious what you guys think.
    The internet is a network, websites/applications and companies rely on the internet network and I think there will be a need for networking (along with sysadmin) moving forward. Cloud services still rely heavily on networking concepts just modified from on-prem aspects to fit the cloud environment.


    Bottom Line: Don't stagnate and keep pursuing knowledge. Stay up to date on current trends and technologies (news, certs, etc.) and be sure to position yourself to pivot your career/skills where the industry is going and where your passion is.
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  3. Little Teapot LeBroke's Avatar
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    #27
    Quote Originally Posted by soccarplayer29 View Post
    Just to clarify we need to breakdown the cloud definitions a bit...the cloud providers offer services (IaaS/PaaS/SaaS/XaaS). With IaaS and PaaS offerings (think AWS, Azure, GCP), they don't manage the guest OS. IaaS providers provide the hardware infrastructure and scalability but does not replace the daily sys admin activities. Companies relying on these cloud services still have to manage the OS and the rest of the stack and therefore sys admins are very much needed. With SaaS the SaaS provider provides the system administration and as companies continue their cloud adoption the sys admin jobs may migrate to the SaaS providers rather than the consumers.
    To add to this, probably worth adding a distinction between IaaS (what you described above, like AWS EC2), PaaS (server layer is abstracted, and you're presented with just the application container, like AWS Lambda or Heroku, and SaaS (cloud services). Things like Gmail for business, Dropbox, and ADP (payroll provider) are SaaS, and they provide functionality that would have previously been run on-premises. Might not be super important to large companies that have the infrastructure and resources to run them in-house (or need to do so for compliance reasons), but extremely useful for tiny shops that don't have a lot of resources to spare for IT infra, especially if it's not their main line of business.

    Also, I feel like this kind of discussion went on 10-15 years ago when sysadmins were heavily involved in hardware operations as well, and virtualization was just becoming popular. Now most hardware work is relegated to low-level techs who mostly just rack, stack, and connect the server to the network to run PXE boot.
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  4. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #28
    It's all depend on what you like first and where do you see yourself fit in. My view is that all Tech fields have good future , but you need to get more in depth in one specific field and try to learn everything about it.
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  5. Senior Member
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    #29
    My workplace has 4 positions, 1 senior sys admin type (VM, Windows, storage, etc); three DevOps types (Linux, scripting, other development skills as assigned) either in requisition or budget form open for 2017 and 2018 respectively.

    The field will always be changing rapidly and its always been a challenge to keep up for everyone to do so. IT careers are rarely planned in terms of decades anymore but in mere years.

    Nothing wrong with the above its just a truism. I only do similar work from a couple of years ago than I do today. The tools, procedures, compliance have all morphed into differing directions.

    AWS and Java are safe bets.

    - b/eads
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