+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 25 of 29
  1. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    26
    #1

    Default Does system administration have a good future?

    I was wondering if system administration is going to have a good future(as well as system engineering), since that is the route I would like to take? There are way more jobs in NY for system administration and engineering then network administration and engineering. With the cloud and all will responsibilities of the cloud shift to system administrators and engineers or how is that going to work?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS -->
  3. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    86

    Certifications
    A+, Network+
    #2
    Wouldn't that just condense server administration to a single centralized location rather than every business having their own? I'm looking towards sys admin, but only as a stepping stone to try and get into pen testing.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Great White North
    Posts
    228

    Certifications
    RHCE
    #3
    Long term - probably not a good outlook as many systems administration tasks are routine and easily automated and if the hype is true, then the future is serverless cloud managed by AI.
    On the other hand we've seen many predictions over the last few decades and most of them were wrong, so who knows.
    "I needed a password with eight characters so I picked Snow White and the Seven Dwarves." (c) Nick Helm
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    325

    Certifications
    A+, Network+, Linux+, HP APS, VCP 3-4-5-6, VSP,VTSP, SSCP, Veeam VMCE, CISSP (endorsement in progress)
    #4
    I think the future lie into technology integration with business. Even if you use cloud, you need to understand and apply the good product to create value to the business.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Senior Member NetworkingStudent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    1,162

    Certifications
    A+, Network+, and Security+. MTA: OS
    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by denis92 View Post
    I was wondering if system administration is going to have a good future(as well as system engineering), since that is the route I would like to take? There are way more jobs in NY for system administration and engineering then network administration and engineering. With the cloud and all will responsibilities of the cloud shift to system administrators and engineers or how is that going to work?
    Good question

    I heard system administration is going towards devo ops. DEV OPS=Administration+ automation. Anyone have any thoughts on this?
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    De' Nile..
    Posts
    837

    Certifications
    "I eat SubNets like You for breakfast..."
    #6
    It's future is Not as bright as it used to be.

    AWS has been consolidating/eliminating SA positions for several years now.

    I don't expect this trend to slow...
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    26
    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by volfkhat View Post
    It's future is Not as bright as it used to be.

    AWS has been consolidating/eliminating SA positions for several years now.

    I don't expect this trend to slow...
    What about devops and system engineering? same fate?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  9. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Hampton, VA
    Posts
    326
    #8
    Even with the trend towards cloud environments, and with the changes in technology, system administration isn't going anywhere.

    As we move toward a more automated environment, the need for sysadmins will be less. At large enterprise, it may well disappear. But, the majority of businesses aren't large enterprises who are optimizing on AWS, and embracing DevOps. At those companies, I am completely comfortable saying there will be a demand for sysadmins for the next 15-20 years.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  10. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    86

    Certifications
    A+, Network+
    #9
    I think there are still businesses out there who, despite assurances, might not be comfortable with leaving proprietary information in the hands of another.

    I'm not that worried. Regularly studying for certs makes you more able to pick up and learn new skills IMO. If push comes to shove, just learn AWS.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  11. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    De' Nile..
    Posts
    837

    Certifications
    "I eat SubNets like You for breakfast..."
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by jibtech View Post
    As we move toward a more automated environment, the need for sysadmins will be less. At large enterprise, it may well disappear. But, the majority of businesses aren't large enterprises who are optimizing on AWS, and embracing DevOps. At those companies, I am completely comfortable saying there will be a demand for sysadmins for the next 15-20 years.
    Quote Originally Posted by N7Valiant View Post
    I think there are still businesses out there who, despite assurances, might not be comfortable with leaving proprietary information in the hands of another.

    I'm not that worried. Regularly studying for certs makes you more able to pick up and learn new skills IMO.
    Guys,
    you can explain it all you want; but the market is contracting.
    Sure there will still be SA positions... but there will be fewer of them.
    But are there going to be fewer Candidates??

    No.
    Expect to see a flood of folks applying/competing for a limited commodity.

    Supply vs Demand.
    Race to the Bottom.
    Contraction.


    Quote Originally Posted by N7Valiant View Post
    If push comes to shove, just learn AWS.
    True enough;
    but you need to get ahead of the trend. don't wait until you've already been squeezed out the market..
    Last edited by volfkhat; 12-02-2017 at 08:16 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  12. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    86

    Certifications
    A+, Network+
    #11
    True, but I'm only looking at Sys Admin as a stepping stone to get into a Security Analyst position and then hopefully Penetration Testing. So I might have different considerations than someone who might have been looking to make a career out of it. The problem now is that there's little to no local demand for AWS where I live, and I'm not too sure what the next step after help desk would be if sys admin isn't there.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  13. Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    46

    Certifications
    A+ (Expired)
    #12
    I often worry about automation in IT, therefore eliminating jobs. I'm still studying IT as that's I could see myself doing so hopefully everything turns out good.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  14. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Buffalo
    Posts
    12

    Certifications
    CCNA: R&S, MCSA-2012, VCP-DCV, Linux+
    #13
    Its not going away anytime soon. At least for next 10 years or so, the demand for Sys Admins will be enough to make a career out of it.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  15. Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    86

    Certifications
    A+, Network+
    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Basic85 View Post
    I often worry about automation in IT, therefore eliminating jobs. I'm still studying IT as that's I could see myself doing so hopefully everything turns out good.
    Eh. There are some things that can't be automated without AI at least. Can't write code for you, even log monitoring isn't foolproof, you'd still need human oversight on security issues. And anything automated needs someone to make, build, and maintain that automation.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  16. Senior Member dontstop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    ::1/128
    Posts
    543

    Certifications
    CompTIA IT Fundamentals, CCENT, CCNA:R&S, JNCIA, BInfoTech
    #15
    In my honest opinion System Administration is not going away it's only cutting off the fat from it's boom period (aka the "Good years") where anyone who had a modest skillset could land a job. Similar to how Web Development had a massive influx of workers during the Dotcom boom and then once the bust occurred a lot of disappeared. During that time anyone who could write even the most basic HTML could land a job making websites for companies. Once the industry collapsed you're only left with the most skilled workers, similar to what is happening today. AI, Automation and Devops are for Sysadmins what Dynamic Web was for Web Developers. Those wouldn't couldn't make the transition ended up being left behind from the industry moving forward.

    Think about the old school *nix admins like from the Unix days, they could program in C and later heavily in Perl and were more Devops than the Sysadmins of today. Now this is coming full circle again, the fat in the industry is always going to be the jobs with the least skill. If you cannot code or are not interested in Cloud technology then you're going to be on the chopping block as companies refine their headcounts. At the end of the day all industries are savage and are always looking to refine, reduce costs and minimize headcounts.
    Last edited by dontstop; 12-03-2017 at 12:54 AM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  17. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    456

    Certifications
    CISSP, PMP, CCNP, FITSP-M
    #16
    It seems like every few years, something comes along to make people cry that the sky is falling. The first time I saw it was with directory services with Novell and I'm sure it wasn't the first time. The sky didn't fall then, or with Active Directory or with the web and it's not falling now.
    2017: CCNP (done), FITSI-M (done) CCIE Written
    2018: CCIE R/S
    2019: VCP (DCV/NV), OSCP
    2020-1: MBA
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  18. Senior Member yoba222's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    433

    Certifications
    LFCS, GCIH, eJPT, CCNA, CAPM, Sec+, Net+, A+
    #17
    I foresee increased automation reducing the need for sys admins, but it will be gradual and there will still be plenty of sysadmin work for the next ten years at least. Perfectly fine career path to start on today.

    As far as AI taking over, until computers can really start thinking like humans for all use cases, AI is and will continue to be over-hyped. Imagine Microsoft's Tay trying to administer a cloud service. Humans > AI at being humans. Drones are going to be a way bigger concern, but that's way off topic.

    I personally worry about an information security bubble 5 years from now for entry to mid level infosec workers. Seems like every 10 posts on the Internet regarding computer careers are for those who aspire to become ethical hackers someday.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  19. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    140

    Certifications
    CompTIA Network+, MCP, MCTS: Windows 7
    #18
    Does network engineering have a good future? Just curious what you guys think.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  20. They are watching you NetworkNewb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Off the grid
    Posts
    2,663

    Certifications
    A+/Net+/Sec+, CCENT, CCNA:Sec, CCSK, GCIH
    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by yoba222 View Post
    I personally worry about an information security bubble 5 years from now for entry to mid level infosec workers. Seems like every 10 posts on the Internet regarding computer careers are for those who aspire to become ethical hackers someday.
    The thing about that is those people who want to become hackers don't really know what all encompasses security and most companies don't have those types of positions. If anything, having more people who want to become hackers will keep those who understand security more in demand.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  21. Senior Member McxRisley's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    235

    Certifications
    Bachelors of Science in IT, MTA, SEC+, CSA+, CASP, C|EH, OSCP
    #20
    Quote Originally Posted by EANx View Post
    It seems like every few years, something comes along to make people cry that the sky is falling. The first time I saw it was with directory services with Novell and I'm sure it wasn't the first time. The sky didn't fall then, or with Active Directory or with the web and it's not falling now.
    This guy knows whats up. Despite the many SA doomsday theories, the SA role is still holding strong in the industry. Hell, we have over 20 SA openings where I work and we cant find anyone that meets the quals to fill them.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  22. Guest
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    958

    Certifications
    A+, Network+, CCNA
    #21
    The industry takes time to evolve. While newer technologies might reduce the number of people needed with one skill set, they increase the number of people needed with another skill set.

    Either way you have to start somewhere, why not start with the basics, work on building a foundation with your experience and education.
    Last edited by Priston; 12-04-2017 at 04:47 PM.
    A.A.S. in Networking Technologies
    A+, Network+, CCNA
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  23. Are we having fun yet? UnixGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    3,363

    Certifications
    GCFA, eJPT, RHCE, Solaris 10, SNIA SCSP, Security+, Server+, ITILv3, CCNA (Expired)
    #22
    In my humble opinion, it's really hard to predict. If you want to be a system admin, make sure to stay relevant and learn all the NEW stuff. Be flexible and be prepared to change fields and cross skill quickly.
    Goal: GCFA (DONE), GPEN
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  24. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    26
    #23
    Quote Originally Posted by UnixGuy View Post
    In my humble opinion, it's really hard to predict. If you want to be a system admin, make sure to stay relevant and learn all the NEW stuff. Be flexible and be prepared to change fields and cross skill quickly.
    What kind of fields can you transition to from sysadmin? I would like to consider my options but I am not sure what my backup plan would be yet in case it sysadmin dies out eventually... haven't seen many cloud jobs
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  25. Little Teapot LeBroke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    360

    Certifications
    RHCSA
    #24
    I think for the purpose of this discussion, it makes sense to separate "DevOps" into three separate topics. DevOps itself is more of a philosophy (that is or is not a job title based on who you ask), and deals with optimizing/improving processes to add business value, through things like more reliable infrastructure, faster code deploys, better monitoring, etc.

    Then, there's automation. I.e. configuration management, server build outs, provisioning, stuff like CloudFormation and Terraform if you use cloud services. Can be cloud or on-premises. Powershell also falls under this.

    Finally, there's the actual cloud (IaaS, PaaS)... which is basically just someone else's servers where hypervisor, provisioning, and most of the infrastructure (i.e. storage, networking) is abstracted away behind an API or a web page.

    The first one is IMO mostly a fad, since the end goal is instead of doing DevOps by specialized DevOps people, to bridge the gap between development and operations (i.e. have devs more involved with running infrastructure, and have sysadmins more involved with applications and SDLC). The second one is here to stay, and is probably the most important part. There's functionally little difference between a sysadmin and a DevOps/SRE guy. A sysadmin could just as easily use automation tools in his day job, with the exception of really small shops. The third one is outsourcing your on premises infrastructure to someone else to save you money, time, and effort.

    Assuming you learn automation, your job isn't going away (even if your job title might be different).

    The third one is mostly going to affect tiny shops. Not because AWS is such a game changer (it is, but for a different set of problems), but because tiny shops don't need an IT guy anymore doing SMB stuff. Honestly, how many 10-people companies even use an MSP these days? Chances are, they use Google Docs, OneDrive, ADP, Office 365, or any combination of similar services. Why spend a lot of money on an in-house Exchange server, hosting your corporate website, having a file server (or even a NAS), if you can just pay a small fee and not have to deal with any of this at all? This is the direction I see a lot of small businesses heading in these days.

    Actual cloud IaaS/PaaS still has people managing it (some of these people are sysadmins rebranded into DevOps, others are just developers who picked it up), and people working on the back end, at Amazon, Google, Rackspace, etc.

    What kind of fields can you transition to from sysadmin? I would like to consider my options but I am not sure what my backup plan would be yet in case it sysadmin dies out eventually... haven't seen many cloud jobs


    Search any job site for "cloud," "devops," "SRE," or "site reliability engineer". Unless you live in the boonies, there's going to be dozens of results.
    Last edited by LeBroke; 12-05-2017 at 01:24 AM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  26. Are we having fun yet? UnixGuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    3,363

    Certifications
    GCFA, eJPT, RHCE, Solaris 10, SNIA SCSP, Security+, Server+, ITILv3, CCNA (Expired)
    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by denis92 View Post
    What kind of fields can you transition to from sysadmin? I would like to consider my options but I am not sure what my backup plan would be yet in case it sysadmin dies out eventually... haven't seen many cloud jobs

    Sales, Pre-Sales, Architecture, Support, Design, Project Management, Management, Risk, Network Security, Cyber security, GRC, ...etc. Anything really, you can build up new skills with your strong foundation as a system admin. Be a well rounded system admin and don't specialise in just one thing.
    Goal: GCFA (DONE), GPEN
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Social Networking & Bookmarks