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  1. LA2
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    #26
    Sorry to hear that. Interviewing can be tough, it's rough for me too. One thing that might help is to have a family member or friend that you can talk to and maybe go through an interview scenario. I also think recording yourself, listing to your voice and watching your movements helps some.
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  3. Senior Member boxerboy1168's Avatar
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    #27
    be more confident stop being afraid and just be yourself
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
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    #28

    Post some tips?

    I have been on both sides of interviews and probably given hundreds of interviews for various positions. I have hired hundreds as well. Mostly R&D jobs, QA, support, etc. However, I always did my best to make the person feel like it was a conversation. I viewed candidates as also interviewing me to learn of what it would be like to work for my company as well as for me or one of my managers or directors.

    With all that in mind, I know there are many different styles out there but here are some tips that also drove me crazy with certain candidates:


    1. THINK about the question. A short pause may be appreciated vs someone rambling on and swimming for an actual answer.
    2. Answer questions in the shortest manner possible but with enough room for a follow up question if there is an interest. Longest answer I ever received was for my first question: "what is your interest in our company?" I'm not kidding when I say that someone took 30 full breathless minutes to respond to this. My 2nd was the last.
    3. Focus on what YOU did as a leader / contributor and not what your team / other staff did.
    4. Talk about project outcomes that produced success in your career (do not repeat resume details verbatim - I can read). Also, be humble and show you are a team player.
    5. Watch out for trick questions like "tell me about your weaknesses" or "what is your Achilles heal in the workplace?" I rarely asked this but used to for fun and there are some things you should not say here. Some of these answers scared the hell out of me.
    6. Be pleasant, polite, and courteous to everyone you interface with before, during and after your visit. I think most try but have met a few sour pineapples in my day. The person you cutoff on the way into the company parking lot might be the CEO (yup, this happened).
    7. You are your own sales spokes person. You are selling your skills and experience. Master this and develop a delivery strategy. Formulate it with a creative (but not corny) pitch for each area and practice it. Practice with friends / family. Record it and review if possible.
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  5. Certification Invigilator Forum Admin JDMurray's Avatar
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    #29
    What most job candidates fail to realize is that, while in an interview, they must also interview the interviewers. During an interview, many job candidates act as if they are being critically judged and interrogated. This mindset causes the candidate to shrink and be submissive and subservient during the interview and not appear at their best. Instead, the candidate needs to be confidant and act as a (near) equal to the interviewers. You do this by occasionally assuming the role of an interviewer and asking questions for clarification and opinions that are not distracting from the interview. Even occasionally joke with the interviewers to break any tension. You should form a rapport as if you are one of the interviewers and not the the target of the interview. This will give you confidence in the interview and help you appear as if you are "cut from the same cloth" as the interviewers, which is what you want to achieve during an interview. Most salespeople seem to know instinctively how to do this, but most technical people certainly do not.
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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by JDMurray View Post
    What most job candidates fail to realize is that, while in an interview, they must also interview the interviewers. During an interview, many job candidates act as if they are being critically judged and interrogated. This mindset causes the candidate to shrink and be submissive and subservient during the interview and not appear at their best. Instead, the candidate needs to be confidant and act as a (near) equal to the interviewers. You do this by occasionally assuming the role of an interviewer and asking questions for clarification and opinions that are not distracting from the interview. Even occasionally joke with the interviewers to break any tension. You should form a rapport as if you are one of the interviewers and not the the target of the interview. This will give you confidence in the interview and help you appear as if you are "cut from the same cloth" as the interviewers, which is what you want to achieve during an interview. Most salespeople seem to know instinctively how to do this, but most technical people certainly do not.
    I have bought a car or two without even realizing it in my life. Then realized later that I paid more than I should have.
    I bought a brand new (expensive car here) with windshield protection, full coverage insurance, gap insurance and Low Jack. Those smiles and sign here will get you every time. Car didn't even have 100 miles on it and I was taken advantage of in the dealership

    Side Note: I might need to sale cars in my free time.

    Sir,

    Don't argue with me about this positive rep.
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  7. Senior Member
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    #31
    Quote Originally Posted by JDMurray View Post
    What most job candidates fail to realize is that, while in an interview, they must also interview the interviewers. During an interview, many job candidates act as if they are being critically judged and interrogated. This mindset causes the candidate to shrink and be submissive and subservient during the interview and not appear at their best. Instead, the candidate needs to be confidant and act as a (near) equal to the interviewers. You do this by occasionally assuming the role of an interviewer and asking questions for clarification and opinions that are not distracting from the interview. Even occasionally joke with the interviewers to break any tension. You should form a rapport as if you are one of the interviewers and not the the target of the interview. This will give you confidence in the interview and help you appear as if you are "cut from the same cloth" as the interviewers, which is what you want to achieve during an interview. Most salespeople seem to know instinctively how to do this, but most technical people certainly do not.
    And this is one of the reasons why it's easier to find a job when you already have one. You're usually more comfortable, can take your time and ask questions so you can pick your desired workplace, negotiate the salary, etc. When you're starving for work the interviewers know it, they might treat you differently and most people start the interview scared that they might mess up and blow their big lead.

    My last job interview was the best I've ever felt. I went through a few rounds over the phone and the manager brought me in early to talk to me before the group interview. He told me that they were pretty sure I was the one but wanted to make sure I fit in socially, so today is a formality but if I want the job it's mine to take in the future interview. I was instantly at ease, had a big panel interview where we were all laughing together, I couldn't have had a bigger dose of confidence walking into the group. Had I just walked in off the street and knew my mortgage was due in a week and I was broke there is no way I would have felt as comfortable.
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  8. Senior Member
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    #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Danielm7 View Post
    And this is one of the reasons why it's easier to find a job when you already have one. You're usually more comfortable, can take your time and ask questions so you can pick your desired workplace, negotiate the salary, etc. When you're starving for work the interviewers know it, they might treat you differently and most people start the interview scared that they might mess up and blow their big lead.

    My last job interview was the best I've ever felt. I went through a few rounds over the phone and the manager brought me in early to talk to me before the group interview. He told me that they were pretty sure I was the one but wanted to make sure I fit in socially, so today is a formality but if I want the job it's mine to take in the future interview. I was instantly at ease, had a big panel interview where we were all laughing together, I couldn't have had a bigger dose of confidence walking into the group. Had I just walked in off the street and knew my mortgage was due in a week and I was broke there is no way I would have felt as comfortable.
    It's more of a psychological thing, if you don't get an offer, it's not big deal as you already have a job. Another thing to note that just because you have a job that doesn't mean you'll get an offer. I'm in a situation where I'm not that desperate for a job so if an employer treated me horribly, I'd have no problems up and leaving.
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  9. Junior Member
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    #33
    They were looking for an enterprise experienced person and clearly you are not that based on your certifications. I hate when employers decide to waste my time. I have gained a new appreciation for phone first interviews. I put everything on the table right then so that we all know what our expectations are. I am reluctant to go into a face2face interview without having talked to someone in great detail first.
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  10. Certification Invigilator Forum Admin JDMurray's Avatar
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    #34
    Quote Originally Posted by GirlyGirl View Post
    I bought a brand new (expensive car here) with windshield protection, full coverage insurance, gap insurance and Low Jack.
    What, no rust-proof undercoating?

    I once practically demanded that a car salesman sell me LoJack for an extra $1500. Only when my auto insurance company told me the LoJack didn't really lower my rates by any significant amount did I realize that I did the salesman's job for him.

    Quote Originally Posted by GirlyGirl View Post
    Don't argue with me about this positive rep.
    No argument here and thank you!
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  11. Senior Member ypark's Avatar
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    #35
    I consider myself an introvert and I, too, get really nervous before my interviews. What had help me the most was practice and repetition. Just like when you would study for a cert. Think of it as just another skill or knowledge you need to master.

    Google a bunch of interview questions and write down the answer for each. Sit in front of a mirror and practice your delivery. You want to practice until you are fluent and not awkward even when you don't remember your answer word for word. I guess doing mock interviews with friend/family may be better but I'd be too shy even for that.

    During the interview, if you find yourself stumbling and uncomfortable, slow it down. It is OK to ask the interviewer to repeat or clarify the question to buy yourself some time to think. Also, I have told the interviewers that I did not know the answer to their question many times. If you are unsure of the answer, let them know and you can follow that up with what you think it is based on the similar topics you do know.

    I have probably spent 20+ hours doing this last time I was looking for a job. Two interviews. Two offers. You just have to keep working at it.

    Good luck. Hope you catch a break soon.
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  12. Senior Member
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    #36
    Thanks so much guys. I love this forum. The interview I was hoping for never came. We were in email contact before the holidays to nail down a date and time for an interview, but they dropped communication. I wasn't even being difficult so that's a red flag anyway in my book.

    Now I got an interview for a great opportunity that very much aligns to some of my other IT and business skills. I have a week to prepare and I plan to go through the job details line by line and get my pitch together. I plan to WIN!
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  13. Senior Member GeekyChick's Avatar
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    #37
    I've said some pretty dumb things in interviews before and I consider myself an extrovert. So, you're definitely not alone. The thing, I think, to have in mind going into the interview is why you would be a good candidate and why you would be the best person for the job. Of course you need to do your research on the company so you can talk intelligently on why you would be the best fit for the job.

    If you mess up maybe at the end you could recover and say something like, "I was really nervous and I realize I answered the question wrong but here are some good reasons why I would be an excellent employee" and of course tell them why. You have nothing to lose at that point if you feel the interview didn't go well. Sell yourself and know what makes you a good candidate!

    Realize when you go into an interview you are probably already doubting yourself so turn it around and take some pressure off yourself. Think of it as an opportunity to practice interviewing. They already like you or they wouldn't have brought you in to the interview so now you need to figure out if you like them.
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