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  1. Senior Member
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    #26
    Quote Originally Posted by jamesindc View Post
    Thanks for all your replies. It's all very helpful advice.

    Just to tell you about my background. I have a liberal arts bachelors degree and have about 3-4 years of technical experience mainly doing lower level help desk work.

    To be honest, I'm pursuing a Masters because I'm curious about the field of IT and how things work. Because of that reason, I've decide to pursue a Masters in Information Technology that will expose me to databases, programming, web development, networking and security.

    I feel that I'm limited in what I can learn at my job and with certifications. I want the context of how things fit together and conceptual understanding that comes with taking graduate level classes.

    I'm looking into UMUC's Master of Information Technology with a concentration in Informatics. What do you guys think about this program?
    The things you need to consider:

    1.) Are you paying out of pocket? Or is your employer willing to pay for it? That can make a big difference as the ROI may not be worth taking on loads of student loan debt.

    2.) A typical masters degree is going to teach you concepts on paper, not in a live environment. WGU could be a good option as the cost is very reasonable, it's accredited and you will gain some certs too.

    Do you research and find out what is going to benefit you the most in the short term and long term. You have options.
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  3. Senior Member McxRisley's Avatar
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    #27
    So the reason's you just listed for wanting to obtain a Masters are all of the wrong reasons. The type of things you want to learn are things that you learn from doing actual work, not from taking college courses.
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  4. Junior Member NiTech-5's Avatar
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    #28
    ^ Perhaps. But, not all workplaces are willing to take the time to train you in such skills. Unless you have lots of time to teach them to yourself. At least, that's the mentality in this particular area (US East Coast to be exact).

    Anyway, not the oldest thread and hopefully the OP gets a notification. I'm also in this same boat of wanting a Masters in IT or Cybersecurity and have been debating about choosing IT or Cybersecurity these past few days. As pointed out by a previous member in this thread, cybersecurity is indeed a multi-discipline field with a technical, administrative, and physical realm. Interestingly, I was able to get a degree with a specialization in Cybersecurity Policy - which can be interpreted as focusing strictly on the administrative component of cybersecurity (cyber governance; procedures/policy; information assurance; general cyber/technical terminology).

    But, I'm pursuing the Security+ first. Then, will weight in the Masters in the next year or two because I'm seeking to add a technical component to my current cyber[policy] background. This thread has also given me many good things to consider when debating about an MS in General IT or cybersecurity. Evidently, I already have a Bachelors (non-IT/non-STEM). So, I will take the general IT route instead since my current background isn't 'purely' technical.
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  5. Junior Member NiTech-5's Avatar
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    #29
    Quote Originally Posted by jamesindc View Post
    Thanks for all your replies. It's all very helpful advice.

    Just to tell you about my background. I have a liberal arts bachelors degree and have about 3-4 years of technical experience mainly doing lower level help desk work.

    To be honest, I'm pursuing a Masters because I'm curious about the field of IT and how things work. Because of that reason, I've decide to pursue a Masters in Information Technology that will expose me to databases, programming, web development, networking and security.

    I feel that I'm limited in what I can learn at my job and with certifications. I want the context of how things fit together and conceptual understanding that comes with taking graduate level classes.

    I'm looking into UMUC's Master of Information Technology with a concentration in Informatics. What do you guys think about this program?
    Yes, I found out about this yesterday. It's something that I'm keeping my eye on. One big advantage is that it is 100% online and the price tag is quite decent. Anything else that I do for schooling preferably needs to be 100% online. There's also the UMUC MS in Cybersecurity and Technology program (also online) if you look more into UMUC. But, I see myself going for general IT as recommended.

    While I clearly agree that cybersecurity is here to stay, the BS or MS crap in Cybersecurity is quite new. I'm 25 and pursued my Bachelors in 2011-2015. Even during that time, there was no specific cybersecurity major on my campus. Only IT or computer science with concentrations in gaming, software& web development, and robotics. Based on my search, you can find cheaper Masters programs in 'General IT' with a specialization in Security compared to most purely specialized Cybersecurity programs out there these days...Just something to consider.
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