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  1. Senior Member
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    #26
    It's always entertaining when older/married people say certain places are great places to live...except for the fact those places are usually lacking in a lot of social activities. Honestly if you are moving far from where you live and don't know people in a location, I would stick to at least around 1 million or more population because of job options and social life. Small places like Huntsville tend to be reliant on a single industry (usually government)...which could be a positive or negative depending on how you look at it...of course its negative though if budget cuts happen.

    On a side note, you could never pay me enough to go to Alabama.
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  3. Member kaiju's Avatar
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    #27
    Social life is irrelevant when rent and bills consume so much of the paycheck that there is almost nothing left to save and just enough to not be on a ramen noodle diet. Partying at the soup kitchen doesn't sound like fun to me. Take advantage of the ability to move around with ease (without uprooting your family) earlier in your career. There are lots of $90k+ jobs with well known companies available in Hunstville, Birmingham, Mobile, and other cities in Alabama.

    Low COLA areas with great salaries and a chance to get some much needed experience is win-win-win. Do one or two years and then move on to something bigger and better. The biggest problem with places like Huntsville is you cannot land a decent paying position without the required security clearance and experience.

    Oh yeah, GS9 job is the suck!! Unless it will definitely lead to a GS11 with career advancement opportunities. I would not take anything less than GS11.

    Contract positions - research the company thoroughly. The better companies will pull you in with their incentive packages like:
    Job related certs are paid (reimbursed) but you have to stay with the company for 1~2 years
    Training for job related certs is free: Many have their own LMS site or have LMS partners and will send you to boot camps if time permits.
    Offer $5k~$10k per year in tuition assistance for employees pursuing college degrees.
    Corporate card to ease travel and job related expenses.
    Relocation assistance: $5k~$10k to move to a different site.
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  4. Senior Member McxRisley's Avatar
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    #28
    Quote Originally Posted by kaiju View Post
    There are lots of $90k+ jobs with well known companies available in Hunstville, Birmingham, Mobile, and other cities in Alabama.
    I would like to point out that if you are expecting to make $90K right out of college, then you should probably start preparing for how to deal with extreme disappointment or plan to work 4-5 jobs.
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  5. Member kaiju's Avatar
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    #29
    lol... you completely took that out of context.

    All of those jobs require experience 3~5 years experience with a degree.
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  6. Senior Member
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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Deus Ex Machina View Post
    facing a terrible job climate in my state (Connecticut). I have a hard time finding work even within the state
    Sorry, but that is crazy talk. CT is a great place to work and live, if you can get past the constant negativity from people who just like to complain. Very tight labor market as well, you should have been able to find something very quickly. I haven't read past your first post here, have you posted your resume for review?
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  7. Completely Clueless TechGromit's Avatar
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    #31
    I know it sucks working something like Tier 1 Helpdesk when you have a degree, but everyone has to start somewhere. Unless you have connections, it's rare to get a job in your specialty right out of college, your going to have to take some detours to get to your destination. Just make sure where ever you get a job, it's with a big organization where you can move up into the position you desire. Working for a small business is a dead end (unless it's an IT consulting firm), except for the experience.
    Last edited by TechGromit; 12-26-2017 at 01:50 PM.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
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    #32
    Quote Originally Posted by ratbuddy View Post
    Sorry, but that is crazy talk. CT is a great place to work and live, if you can get past the constant negativity from people who just like to complain. Very tight labor market as well, you should have been able to find something very quickly. I haven't read past your first post here, have you posted your resume for review?
    Something is wrong with Connecticut.
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  9. Senior Member McxRisley's Avatar
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    #33
    Quote Originally Posted by kaiju View Post
    lol... you completely took that out of context.

    All of those jobs require experience 3~5 years experience with a degree.
    Lol I know but it wasn't stated so I just wanted to make OP aware of reality. I know too many people that came out of school expecting to make the big bucks(myself included).
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  10. Senior Member
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    #34
    Quote Originally Posted by mactex View Post
    Yep, that's the kind of negativity I was talking about.
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  11. What The?! Fulcrum45's Avatar
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    #35
    In a similar vein to what Kaiju said; If you're willing to travel anywhere in the U.S. perhaps you're willing to travel anywhere in the world? Many people will say Vectrus isn't a great company to work for (wasn't my experience) BUT we're talking 100K+ salary in Afghanistan (living on a US military base), you get a security clearance and see some...interesting parts of the world. Two of my previous co-workers were taking their first IT jobs with Vectrus- one was 19 years old. Once they were done they moved on to other better paying contracts. Point is, you get that first year under your belt and you have the money, experience and mobility for more options. Plus it's a lot easier when you don't have a family to keep you grounded. Just my two cents. I can understand someone not wanting to make that a part of their IT career but it could be just the jolt it needs.
    Last edited by Fulcrum45; 12-26-2017 at 06:47 PM.
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    #36
    Quote Originally Posted by ratbuddy View Post
    Yep, that's the kind of negativity I was talking about.
    Hey, i'm not happy about it either. If it was booming with opportunity instead of facing bankruptcy; i would move the family back in a heart beat. I believe I gave the young man sound advice; based on actual data and my own experience.
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  13. Achieve excellence daily
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    #37
    Find somewhere you want to live and then find a job in that place. Avoid a masters for now until you have some experience and know what you want to specialize in.
    When you go the extra mile, there's no traffic.
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  14. Senior Member
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    #38
    Quote Originally Posted by TechGuru80 View Post
    It's always entertaining when older/married people say certain places are great places to live...except for the fact those places are usually lacking in a lot of social activities. Honestly if you are moving far from where you live and don't know people in a location, I would stick to at least around 1 million or more population because of job options and social life. Small places like Huntsville tend to be reliant on a single industry (usually government)...which could be a positive or negative depending on how you look at it...of course its negative though if budget cuts happen.

    On a side note, you could never pay me enough to go to Alabama.
    Can you even have a social life early in your career when most of your time is spent juggling work, studying for certs, studying for a Bachelor's?

    I just assumed they called it a Bachelor's because I can't afford to have a social life until I get one.
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  15. Senior Member
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    #39
    Quote Originally Posted by ratbuddy View Post
    Sorry, but that is crazy talk. CT is a great place to work and live, if you can get past the constant negativity from people who just like to complain. Very tight labor market as well, you should have been able to find something very quickly. I haven't read past your first post here, have you posted your resume for review?
    CT has no redeeming qualities. The government never met a tax they didn't like and drove many long term firms out of state.
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  16. Senior Member xxxkaliboyxxx's Avatar
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    #40
    Quote Originally Posted by TechGuru80 View Post
    It's always entertaining when older/married people say certain places are great places to live...except for the fact those places are usually lacking in a lot of social activities. Honestly if you are moving far from where you live and don't know people in a location, I would stick to at least around 1 million or more population because of job options and social life. Small places like Huntsville tend to be reliant on a single industry (usually government)...which could be a positive or negative depending on how you look at it...of course its negative though if budget cuts happen.


    On a side note, you could never pay me enough to go to Alabama.
    For what's it worth, the bar scene in Huntsville is awesome, this is from me being station at RedStone (Army base in Huntsville) last year. Population is about 300k, so it's not a big city by any means, but 300k isn't small town Fort Leonard Wood status (1k).

    I don't know about you guys, but I party my ass off in Huntsville and work my butt off able to pivot into private InfoSec from there. Awesome experience all around.

    Some posters are right though, security clearance for almost all positions and only few companies able to provide a clearance if you don't have one. Do your research first.
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  17. Senior Member
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    #41
    Welcome to the bottom of the totem pole pal. You need to put the Masters degree talk aside for a while, because it won't help you when you hardly have any real experience. Stop worrying about where you went to school too, because many people don't even finish college or attempt it at all. You have options though...look for paid internships, part time, contract work, etc.

    Something will come up, just keep searching and be open minded.
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  18. Senior Member snokerpoker's Avatar
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    #42
    I don't know the east coast job market at all. I will say that the Bay Area has tons of IT work. If you are able, think about moving to the Bay Area. Granted, if you are working entry level..... you will rent a small apartment or a room somewhere and juuuust have enough to get by but there are tons of opportunities around here.

    Another option is try volunteering at local school district or something along those lines. That is a great way to fill in your resume with some actual hands on technical work.
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  19. Senior Member
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    #43
    Quote Originally Posted by TechGuru80 View Post
    It's always entertaining when older/married people say certain places are great places to live...except for the fact those places are usually lacking in a lot of social activities.
    Some places are great for introverts, others for extroverts and some for both.
    2018: CCIE Written (R/S) (done - Jan), CCIE R/S
    After that: MBA, OSCP
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  20. Junior Member
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    #44
    I was in the same boat. I was jobless after graduation when all my friends got offered.

    I finally found a low paying help desk job after 4 months making 15$/hr. I worked hard and by the end of the 1st year, i was making 25$ an hour.

    With that experience, I was able to jump into a system admin role, then system engineer.

    Stay positive and work from the bottom up.
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  21. Senior Member McxRisley's Avatar
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    #45
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill2nice View Post
    I was in the same boat. I was jobless after graduation when all my friends got offered.

    I finally found a low paying help desk job after 4 months making 15$/hr. I worked hard and by the end of the 1st year, i was making 25$ an hour.

    With that experience, I was able to jump into a system admin role, then system engineer.

    Stay positive and work from the bottom up.
    Same here, it took me a year to land my first IT job but once I did my career took off. Did 8 months as tier 2 support, then landed a DoD contracting job as a sys admin for 10 months, then moved up to C&A analyst for 10 months, then landed a pentesting role which I was in for about 5 months before moving back home and reclaiming my C&A job lol

    You'll get there, just keep applying and stay positive.
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  22. Senior Member Deus Ex Machina's Avatar
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    #46
    Thanks for the information guys.

    @Fulcrum45
    Thanks! I've been looking into Vectrus for the past few days and it doesn't seem like a bad option at all. On my radar. My parents don't like the idea of me going to the middle east though haha.


    @snorkerpoker
    Bay Area sounds like paradise but I dunno if I'll be able to survive financially. I would need to get pretty lucky.


    @Connecticut discussion
    There's been a string of bad news surrounding this state for a very long time now. I used to be in the camp defending CT, but its hard to defend it now.

    @everyone else
    Yep, I know starting at the bottom of the totem pole isn't fun for anyone. I guess we all gotta start somewhere...
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  23. Senior Member
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    #47
    you are too young to be lost or pissed off.

    If you stress now things wont get easier.
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  24. Senior Member NetworkingStudent's Avatar
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    #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Deus Ex Machina View Post
    Hi guys,

    I doubt many of you guys remember one of my last posts from a while ago,
    Nope I don't remember your post



    Quote Originally Posted by Deus Ex Machina View Post
    Hi guys,

    I am in a kinda cruddy situation where I have good credentials from an education perspective, but no connections and facing a terrible job climate in my state (Connecticut).
    You're in college, correct? Connect with people from your school on linked in! Try to meet for coffee!

    What do you have in common.? You both went to the same school

    Give help to thoers with in your network,before asking for help.


    Quote Originally Posted by Deus Ex Machina View Post
    Hi guys,
    I hate begging people for job leads, but do any of you guys have recommendations?
    I doubt many of you guys remember one of my last posts from a while ago,

    Yes, I would volunteer using your IT skills. Check out volunteer match. This is what I did when I was starting out. Also, talk to your school's student employment offfice. See if the school has any positions, or if they know of any openings with other companies.

    Have you posted your resume on Dice and made it searchable? Recruiters will call you!

    If you want to move you can check on this map..
    Cybersecurity Supply And Demand Heat Map

    It's mostly focused on info sec jobs
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
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  25. Senior Member cshkuru's Avatar
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    #49

    Default To go with the cybersecurity heatmap

    I have a Spreadsheet that I update every two weeks and keep the data for the last 6 weeks of what certs have the most jobs posted on linked in and indeed - it's based off certs that people in my office have or are pursuing, but it kind of gives an idea of where to concentrate your efforts certs wise. The last column about ratios is stolen from the cyberseek map

    Jobs_12_27_2017_Graph.JPGJobs_12_27_2017.jpg
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  26. What The?! Fulcrum45's Avatar
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    #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Deus Ex Machina View Post
    Thanks for the information guys.

    @Fulcrum45
    Thanks! I've been looking into Vectrus for the past few days and it doesn't seem like a bad option at all. On my radar. My parents don't like the idea of me going to the middle east though haha.
    Yeah, it's a tough sell to family sometimes. If you have any questions, shoot me a PM. Been through it once and I'm currently in the process to go back for another stint.
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