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  1. zdx
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    #1

    Default Working Two Full Time Jobs

    Hello all,

    I currently am struggling with money at my current public sector job. I need to keep the healthcare benefits in case anything should happen so leaving isn't an option. I've considered working a third shift position that I see posted on job boards every so often. Has anyone worked these before? I figure depending on the work I may some downtime to finish up my BS and earn some certs along the way. I'm 26.

    In the jest of this all I'd like to eventually move on with a job with more responsibility and pay. Network Engineer.
    Last edited by zdx; 12-29-2017 at 02:54 AM.
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  2. SS
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    #2
    Working 3rd shift sucks. As a second job its even worse. You will have little to no sleep and often no life outside of work. I also wouldn't expect all 3rd shift positions to give you leisure time to study. Depending on the role you might be even busier than your day job. If you need to do it, I would recommend looking for short term contract gigs to start with so that you can gauge how well it works for you without causing any major disruption to your life, or your potential employer if you end up not being able to handle it after so long.
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  4. Member
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    #3
    Good Morning,

    I have worked two jobs before. It has several advantages and some disadvantages. I will name those based upon my experience.

    Advantages:
    1. More Money
    2. Resume pad.
    3. Added Experience learning new, if applicable technologies.
    4. Networking
    5. More often than not, night shift is the slower portion of the day.
    6. The leadership never rolls out of bed at 2am to drive to work to check on you. So, you are away from your superiors. Which can be a good thing. Keeps your name under the radar.

    Disadvantages:
    1. Loss of sleep, although depending on the atmosphere people will sleep on breaks. Also, depending on the atmosphere people will have sleep rotations.
    2. Less time away from family. So, with that being said I wouldn't make the two jobs thing a long term adventure. Maybe 6 months just to catch up.
    3. More miles on your vehicle. I literally bought a second vehicle. Having one vehicle working two jobs will heavily increase the millage on your vehicle..
    4. Animals. If you are single, it's best to release the dog to a family, friend, or no kill shelter (my preference, doesn't have to be yours). If you are not the only one in your household it doesn't matter.


    Mr. John Doee (done forget the e)
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  5. Senior Member
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    #4
    I don't suppose you can just look for a job that pays better and offers good healthcare coverage? Public sector jobs outside of federal are pretty notorious for being low pay but high benefits. But I've had pretty good insurance in the private sector(retail) back when I broke my leg and couldn't work for a couple of months.
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  6. Junior Member
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    #5
    same here
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  7. Senior Member
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    #6
    Don't need to know your health details but would it really be a problem if you left for a higher paying job and just used their health benefits? Some might take a month or two to roll over, might be able to get insurance on your own in that time if it's a thing.

    Maybe in the interim work on a detailed budget? Maybe you are making enough for right now but spending too much without realizing? That happens to many/most people.

    Working 16 hour days + double commutes, you'll barely even be able to sleep or eat, I can't imagine you'll function very well at either of your jobs.
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  8. Senior Member
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    #7
    not a good idea to do that. First of all it's the energy spend, you will get tired and have no time for anything else. Then its tax complications and all that. And then it's also the non compete of your current employer or future employer.
    My company for example, allows me to have a second job but I can not have a 2nd job in the same industry/sector. There are conflicts of interests when doing that.
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  9. What The?! Fulcrum45's Avatar
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    #8
    I have to agree with the others. No matter how laid back the third shift job MIGHT be, you're still going to feel exhausted. That will greatly impact your studies, personal life and create a lot of unhealthy stress on your body. I tried to work a part time job once on top of a full time job and it was a no go. On the days I worked both it was 8am - 11pm and I never had a full day off on the weekends.
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  10. Senior Member
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    #9
    Poor solution, look for a better job.
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  11. California Kid JoJoCal19's Avatar
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    #10
    There was a thread similar to this one, albeit about part-time second jobs. The best advice came from dave330i. Instead you should put all of that time and effort into learning new skills and getting the certs that will land you a new job and jump in salary. I was at a point where I was looking to get part-time work but took his advice and just put the time and effort into solidifying my knowledge in some areas, certs, and improving my resume and it paid off.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, GCIA, GSEC, AWS CCP, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, BSBA - UF, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: MS Cybersecurity, AWS Certified Security - Specialty, Learning Linux & Python
    Next Up:​ AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate
    Reading:​ A Cloud Guru, Code Academy
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