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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Default Resume Review Advice

    Hello,

    I have written my resume awhile ago and i am wondering if it is good or not and if not what should be changed and improved.

    resume sample.pdf
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  3. Senior Member mikey88's Avatar
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    #2
    Is your goal to break into IT field? If so, the resume needs to be tailored to that. Describe in more detail your college curriculum, list any volunteer work/internship in IT. Your summary statement should be a couple sentences long describing your experience and what you bring to the table.
    2018 Goals: CySA+[] CISSP [ ]
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  4. Burn Baby Burn! Cisco Inferno's Avatar
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    #3
    fix the statement area. The english in it is pretty weak. Remove highschool diploma. get rid of the really old position. insert lines mentioning your soft skills, such as customer service, communication with management, able to work with other depts. Stuff like that. The most important thing in entry level IT is personality, how you speak to others, how you communicate technical things to non tech. Like the above poster mentioned, where is all the tech stuff on this resume? you did go to school for two years. might want to mention more on that.
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  5. Senior Member
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    #4
    1) When you're first starting out, the benefit of including non IT jobs is to show that you have a history of staying in the same job, that you aren't a job hopper. I think you do this, especially with your current job.

    2) You don't say where you are so it's hard to know if terms like "human directional" are standard for your area or not. If you're in the US, I'd get rid of it and replace it with something a bit more standard. Same goes for "runner". I'm going to guess these are "sign twirler" and "waiter" and if sign twirler is correct, I'd use something like "interactive marketing agent".

    3) You have a lot of potential with your current job that you aren't using. Starting off, your job is likely to have a lot of process to it, in much the same way your current job has processes that need to be followed to-a-T. Leverage this.

    4) How do I know you can do the job I have an opening for? You have an Associates in networking but you don't say what that means and you don't have any certifications? And with the earn-date being 2018, do you have it or is it still in progress? Don't pretend to have something you don't have. There's no faster way to get kicked out of my office than to be found lying on a resume.

    5) I prefer to see paragraphs instead of bullets and always give people a -1 when I'm reviewing a resume filled with them. I want to hire people who can write and I can't see if someone can when all they give me is bullets.

    6) Your summary statement isn't doing you any favors, nor are your "key competencies". Seriously, "handling and moving objects"? I'm not fond of summary statements but I think they have a place when someone is just starting out. This is your area to convince a hiring manager that you have the skills they're looking for but statements like "Recently close to completing an Associate degree in General Education" does more harm than help. If you have a degree in networking, why mention general studies?

    7) Why say you're interested in a help desk role? Doing so tells a hiring manager that you might not be interested in a tier-1 role doing anything else.

    Recipient of Associates of Science in Networking looking to start IT career. I have years of experience following established process as well as experience in customer service.
    2018: CCIE Written (R/S) (done - Jan), CCIE R/S
    After that: MBA, OSCP
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  6. Junior Member
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by mikey88 View Post
    Is your goal to break into IT field? If so, the resume needs to be tailored to that. Describe in more detail your college curriculum, list any volunteer work/internship in IT. Your summary statement should be a couple sentences long describing your experience and what you bring to the table.
    Does the resume need to be redone quite abit? Sorry if its annoying, but volunteer/interning isnt an option. Yes my goal is to find a IT job, and how exactly would my resume need to be changed?
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  7. Junior Member
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by EANx View Post
    1) When you're first starting out, the benefit of including non IT jobs is to show that you have a history of staying in the same job, that you aren't a job hopper. I think you do this, especially with your current job.

    2) You don't say where you are so it's hard to know if terms like "human directional" are standard for your area or not. If you're in the US, I'd get rid of it and replace it with something a bit more standard. Same goes for "runner". I'm going to guess these are "sign twirler" and "waiter" and if sign twirler is correct, I'd use something like "interactive marketing agent".

    3) You have a lot of potential with your current job that you aren't using. Starting off, your job is likely to have a lot of process to it, in much the same way your current job has processes that need to be followed to-a-T. Leverage this.

    4) How do I know you can do the job I have an opening for? You have an Associates in networking but you don't say what that means and you don't have any certifications? And with the earn-date being 2018, do you have it or is it still in progress? Don't pretend to have something you don't have. There's no faster way to get kicked out of my office than to be found lying on a resume.

    5) I prefer to see paragraphs instead of bullets and always give people a -1 when I'm reviewing a resume filled with them. I want to hire people who can write and I can't see if someone can when all they give me is bullets.

    6) Your summary statement isn't doing you any favors, nor are your "key competencies". Seriously, "handling and moving objects"? I'm not fond of summary statements but I think they have a place when someone is just starting out. This is your area to convince a hiring manager that you have the skills they're looking for but statements like "Recently close to completing an Associate degree in General Education" does more harm than help. If you have a degree in networking, why mention general studies?

    7) Why say you're interested in a help desk role? Doing so tells a hiring manager that you might not be interested in a tier-1 role doing anything else.

    Recipient of Associates of Science in Networking looking to start IT career. I have years of experience following established process as well as experience in customer service.
    Are the bullet points bad and is something that really needs to be removed?

    Whats wrong saying interested in a help desk role? Is it better to say i am looking for entry role and the job title or something else? And you said the summary statement your not fond of and the key competencies, should those be changed to skills instead. The Associate degree i plan on finishing this year. And no i have not completed any certifications i am very close to taking the test for CompTIA A+ this week.
    Last edited by brandon2; 02-04-2018 at 07:17 PM.
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  8. Junior Member
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    #7
    Another question is there a standard to writing resumes for certain fields? Like i have noticed there are different resumes for IT
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  9. Senior Member
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    #8
    Don't insinuate you have completed a degree if you haven't, there's nothing wrong with listing it and putting "(completion month/year)". I've known companies to fire people years later because they lied on a resume. And that's not an exaggeration, these are friends who said "I got fired today because..."

    Saying you are looking for a helpdesk role risks being not considered for other roles. If I have an entry-level networking or sysadmin role, I'm more likely to dismiss you because you said "I'm looking for a helpdesk role". There's nothing wrong with saying you're looking for an entry-level position but if you specify a type of job, you risk not being considered for other jobs. Don't specify unless that's the only job you want.
    2018: CCIE Written (R/S) (done - Jan), CCIE R/S
    After that: MBA, OSCP
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  10. Junior Member
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by EANx View Post
    Don't insinuate you have completed a degree if you haven't, there's nothing wrong with listing it and putting "(completion month/year)". I've known companies to fire people years later because they lied on a resume. And that's not an exaggeration, these are friends who said "I got fired today because..."

    Saying you are looking for a helpdesk role risks being not considered for other roles. If I have an entry-level networking or sysadmin role, I'm more likely to dismiss you because you said "I'm looking for a helpdesk role". There's nothing wrong with saying you're looking for an entry-level position but if you specify a type of job, you risk not being considered for other jobs. Don't specify unless that's the only job you want.
    I was applying to job ads on Indeed and i would put interested in the job title, is that still better? I am still confused how i should write my resume and make it better cause there are too many different ways to rewrite it
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  11. Senior Member
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    #10
    It's fine to mention interest in a certain position, but you may want to tailor it to each position you might apply for. However, that would be easier to do in a cover letter. Also, try to type out a cover letter, as I found that dramatically increased the response rate for applications into actual interviews. You would want to think up of any examples at your time in college that would demonstrate skills to the employer and try to emphasize those.
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