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  1. Senior Member draught's Avatar
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    #1

    Question Accidently gave a lower pay range during job interview scheduling

    I was called to schedule a job interview today. I was nervous because I was at work and had to walk away from people nearby.

    Anyway at first when I was asked about money I said it was negotiable I was pressed again on a range and agreed that my range was was in the "higher end" of 15/hr - 18/hr.

    What I meant to say is your ad said 20/hr - 23 so that's my expected range but I was caught off guard by the call and I've been away from the interview process for almost 2 years.

    I believe this is fixable when I do the in person interview. I'm going to play dumb like I never said 15 - 18. If I get an offer letter I'll reject it obviously if the number is that low because my job already pays that and I'll tell them that.

    Does this sound like that big of a mistake? I really want it clear I at least expect 20/hr+
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    #2
    Were you contacting a recruiter or anybody via email? If so, I would email them immediately because if the job doesn't pay what you expect then you don't want to waste everybody's time...even if they can adjust after an offer, you are going to irritate them coming out of left field with an unexpected number. The only situation that might be ok is if for example, you got a higher offer after speaking with them and to make an offer competitive it has to be around or higher than the current offer.

    An important point when applying and interviewing is you have to know your number of what you want and the point you reasonably expect...so a high number that is ideal, and a number that you HAVE to make. Generally around 30% is the ideal number, and 15-20% is the HAVE to get number...the more qualified you are for a job, the more you can command the higher end.
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  4. Senior Member yoba222's Avatar
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    #3
    I predict you're going to lose that job offer.
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  5. Senior Member draught's Avatar
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    #4
    It was over phone with an HR person directly from the company. I had coworkers from my current employer around me so I was nervous and not speaking as freely as normal.

    Yeah I messed up. At this rate I should just cancel the interview, I will try a call back but no way in hell I can take anything less than an 20/hr. I should have said 25/hr for expected.

    Oh well so many companies hiring right now not a huge issue.
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    This is easy. To to the interview they will bring up money let them know you saw $20-23 in the ad is that number correct? Interviews are great no matter if you take the job or not. Think of it as a date. It really is the same thing. So don't stress over it. You know what you need tell them. Either they can do it or not. Good luck on this and have some fun.
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    #6
    Did you sign anything saying you accept a certain $$$ amount?

    If the answer is No; then you are under no obligation to agree to anything.

    Don't cancel that Interview!!

    Go do it; Knock their socks off.

    Then, when the offer comes, that's when you counter/negotiate on the compensation.
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  8. Senior Member draught's Avatar
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    #7
    Thanks and nope didn't sign anything. Just talked to a HR person everything was verbal.

    not sure why there's so much negativity here. It's not like the pay I'm talking about was much either.

    That's my plan really get back into the interview/hiring game again. This time I have leverage because I already have a job in IT so I can walk away easily and am not desperate.

    The problem is my current job has basically no chance of upward mobility, so I basically have to leave if I ever want to get anywhere in the IT field.
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    Just be direct. If they bring up the $15-18 number, just tell them that you were caught off guard while at work and you may have misunderstood the question at the time, but that the advertised payrate range would work for you given the right circumstances. If you get an offer, then you can decide how hard to you want to try to negotiate to the upper end of the range.
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by volfkhat View Post
    Then, when the offer comes, that's when you counter/negotiate on the compensation.
    Don't wait for the offer to come in. If they offer to pay you what you originally told them you wanted and THEN you ask for more, you're probably not going to get the job. Just be upfront and tell them what happened when you have the in-person interview and you should be ok.
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Cameron M View Post
    Don't wait for the offer to come in. If they offer to pay you what you originally told them you wanted and THEN you ask for more, you're probably not going to get the job. Just be upfront and tell them what happened when you have the in-person interview and you should be ok.
    but that $$ came from a random phonecall.
    It carries practically Zero weight.

    Most likely, the person on the Phone, won't even be the person doing the interview.

    I think some of you are Overthinking it.

    If they ask about $$$ during the in-person, tell them the range you are expecting.
    If they don't ask... don't worry about it.

    OP should just focus on Nailing that interview;
    the rest will work itself out...

    If they really like you, they will adjust accordingly.
    Last edited by volfkhat; 02-13-2018 at 01:19 PM.
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  12. Went to the dark side.... Moderator networker050184's Avatar
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    #11
    You're over thinking it. Negotiate when/if there is an offer.
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  13. Senior Member cyberguypr's Avatar
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    #12
    I see what the guys are saying, but to me clarity in pay range is #1. I hate to waste mine and the potential employer's time and therefore would never entertain any discussions unless we both have crystal clear understanding on the compensation range. If 15-18 is a deal breaker for you, I would clarify it spooner than later. But agian, that's just me valuing my time and knowing that budget is not flexible for many companies. As a hiring manager I can tell you that if someone says 15-18 and then switches to 20-23 I would be slightly unenthused in continuing the conversation.
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  14. Went to the dark side.... Moderator networker050184's Avatar
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    #13
    Compensation can certainly change by a couple dollars an hour after someone learns more about the position, responsibilities, company, benefits, etc.
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    #14
    If the position sounds like it's something your really interested in, go to the interview anyways. The interview experience will help you either way since you've been away from the interview process for a while. Also like networker said you can ask for a couple dollars more after you learn more about the position. They also might give you an offer above what you asked for. You never know until you try.
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    Discuss it on the interview, some managers are flexible and understand some are not, but you don't lose anything, just talk about it. If they were offering 20-23 I don't think they would have a problem going on that range.
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  17. Member dizzy_kitty's Avatar
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    #16
    I wouldn't even bring up the first number you gave them. Let them bring up the topic. If they ask you then respond with the hourly rate you want (don't mention the lower rate at all unless they specifically ask). If it's not doable they will likely give you a counter offer. From there you decide what to do. If you decide not to take it then just move on. It's not really time wasted. You got something out of the process: improving your interview and negotiation skills.
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  18. Senior Member
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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by dizzy_kitty View Post
    I wouldn't even bring up the first number you gave them. Let them bring up the topic. If they ask you then respond with the hourly rate you want (don't mention the lower rate at all unless they specifically ask). If it's not doable they will likely give you a counter offer. From there you decide what to do. If you decide not to take it then just move on. It's not really time wasted. You got something out of the process: improving your interview and negotiation skills.
    Ditto.

    Go to the interview, not bringing up the confusion over the pay rate. The HR person that called you may or may not even pass along what you mentioned about the lower rate only because they may have been making sure that you were not going to be above what was advertised. If they give you an offer, offer the lower range, and try to call you out saying "You said you'd work for less.", you could merely state "Well, the interview and seeing the responsibilities of the job role I'd like $X amount." See if they bite.
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