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  1. Member
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    #26
    Quote Originally Posted by mzx380 View Post
    congrats UNIXGUY
    Please keep this thread updated on your progress, we're rooting for you
    Second this!
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  3. Member thedudeabides's Avatar
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    #27
    Congrats! There's a shortage of good technically qualified managers out there.
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  4. Are we having fun yet? UnixGuy's Avatar
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    #28
    3 Months later.. I finished my last final exam for this term..it was quite a ride!

    I learned SO much in those 3 months, it's insane! Now I understand why MBAs from top school have value, so let met explain few things I concluded during my firs term.


    - Don't do an online MBA. Serious. You don't NEED an MBA so unless you get an opportunity to do it on campus from a reputable university, don't do it. Why?

    Because the real learning happens in the group work. Your assigned a group of students, where you get to work under pressure on a weekly basis. Regularly we were asked to read a case, prepare a presentation, and then present to a room full of people competing with you. Good luck. This stuff can not be learned online. You also get to discuss everything in the classroom, and the students are from different fields. The stories you hear are priceless.

    Networking! Now I know what this means. Networking isn't just meeting people in an event and adding them on LinkedIn, the kind of Networking that happens in the MBA is when you get to know your cohort, work with them for two years, develop REAL connections with them, work together on projects. This is Networking. You also know if someone graduated from your school, they're solid (or at least have a minimum base of competency).

    Now if you can't do on Campus MBA, there are plenty of options! For online degrees, you can do Masters of Management, masters of finance/commerce/accounting, or you can do a technical masters. Honestly, certifications have more value for technical careers than masters. If you want to learn about marketing, finance, accounting, strategy, etc...you can read a book and learn everything, this is not what an MBA is for to be honest.


    The MBA is good if you want to change careers, move to management, or move to consulting (for IT consulting you dont need an MBA).



    I was under pressure throughout the entire 3 months. Every week I had home work, group work, then we had mid terms, and finals. I mean literally every week. I did slack when it came to studying, so my grades aren't that good, but I kept my sanity and didn't ignore my social life/exercise/relationship. I went home at midnight few nights a week because I had to deliver group assignment that was due 11:59 pm..assignment was given to us a 9:30 pm. This is pressure. Specially after a long day work + 3 hours lecture. They really test how you work under pressure, and you get better at working under pressure.


    Anyway, I have a week off as of today, and then a homework due next week for the new subject


    Feel free to ask me anything (except personal questions, I can answer those in PMs)
    Goal: MBA, March 2020
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    #29
    Quote Originally Posted by cbdudek View Post
    Congrats! This is just what I did. I was an infrastructure manager and I started on my MBA part time. It took me a little under 3 years to do. After that, I got a job as a Director of IT. I was in that role for a little under 6 years, and I learned a lot. I have since left that to do sales engineering. So I am back in the technical world again, but this time I am helping other Directors out with security related problems in their organizations.

    If I could impart any advice, it would be to take some of your classes in seat. I networked with hundreds of professionals in my in seat classes. Those people helped me find my Director role and this role I have now. Networking is key, and by going after your MBA, you are going to meet a lot of people. Network like crazy man!

    Good luck!
    Congrats on being able to pivot your MBA into something meaningful. I earned mine in 2004 and I never figured out how to use it. Now, it is just wallpaper....
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  6. Are we having fun yet? UnixGuy's Avatar
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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by NavyMooseCCNA View Post
    Congrats on being able to pivot your MBA into something meaningful. I earned mine in 2004 and I never figured out how to use it. Now, it is just wallpaper....

    How did you want to use it if you don't mind me asking? Or what career goal do you have at the moment that you think the MBA would've helped you reach?
    Goal: MBA, March 2020
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    #31
    I started it in the Fall of 2002 and the job market was more than tight, especially for newbies to IT, like me. I started the MBA program to set me off from others.
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    #32
    Quote Originally Posted by NavyMooseCCNA View Post
    I started it in the Fall of 2002 and the job market was more than tight, especially for newbies to IT, like me. I started the MBA program to set me off from others.
    I've found the MBA to be more beneficial for youngster coming out of school. Most job req's will waive experience if you have a masters degree. We have a lot of hot shot consultants coming into our environment via on premise contracting efforts and they are seriously educated. Most if not all of the contractors in their 20's have MBA's from top 25 schools. The folks in their 30's and 40's seem to be less educated on paper.

    While I was purely in IT, this didn't matter as much, experience was king and of course certifications...... From my perspective in the US, MBA's generally help folks in business verticals and/or hybrid verticals. Folks in pure IT roles don't benefit from the MBA as much.....
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    #33
    Quote Originally Posted by DatabaseHead View Post
    I've found the MBA to be more beneficial for youngster coming out of school. Most job req's will waive experience if you have a masters degree. We have a lot of hot shot consultants coming into our environment via on premise contracting efforts and they are seriously educated. Most if not all of the contractors in their 20's have MBA's from top 25 schools. The folks in their 30's and 40's seem to be less educated on paper.

    While I was purely in IT, this didn't matter as much, experience was king and of course certifications...... From my perspective in the US, MBA's generally help folks in business verticals and/or hybrid verticals. Folks in pure IT roles don't benefit from the MBA as much.....
    I had no plan, other than to get a job. I had been out of work for almost nine months and I was running out of ADT (Active Duty Training) days from my command. I can't think of one instance where having an MBA helped me get a job or helped me on the job. My CO from back then encouraged me to start the program because it would make me noticed by employers. The next job after this I found out from a CDR in my command who liked my work ethic and knowledge...
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  10. Are we having fun yet? UnixGuy's Avatar
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    #34
    Quote Originally Posted by NavyMooseCCNA View Post
    I started it in the Fall of 2002 and the job market was more than tight, especially for newbies to IT, like me. I started the MBA program to set me off from others.
    It doesn't help in getting an IT job, quite the opposite, it might work against you. It sure can help you get a consulting job though. Good MBAs have on campus recruitment, did you try that?
    Goal: MBA, March 2020
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    #35
    Why do you feel an MBA would hurt someone in the IT field? Assuming you're taking an Executive or Professional program, this is studying and networking during your off-hours and trying to better yourself.
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    #36
    Quote Originally Posted by supafish9 View Post
    Why do you feel an MBA would hurt someone in the IT field? Assuming you're taking an Executive or Professional program, this is studying and networking during your off-hours and trying to better yourself.
    There sometimes is a misconception about Masters degrees and being overqualified. The reason why this doesn't really apply to an MBA is because the focus is on non-technical areas like managing cost, account, etc...where with technical Masters, there are people who graduate and can oversell themselves past entry jobs but can't get past or even into an intermediate job.

    When people ask me I generally give the following advice:
    -Non-related undergrad, can go for a Masters in a technical area or MBA, but try to get a job prior to completion if you can.
    -Business undergrad, you could get an MBA (although it's not going to have as much of an impact)...or you can go for a technical degree...but again try to get a job prior to completion.
    -Technical undergrad, an MBA will make you well rounded and give you business terminology but you should have some experience going into a program.

    I personally have a business undergrad with sales experience, then went and got a technical masters degree. I didn't really see any issues getting into a security job (had 1 internship)...however regular IT type jobs almost never called.
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  13. Are we having fun yet? UnixGuy's Avatar
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    #37
    Quote Originally Posted by supafish9 View Post
    Why do you feel an MBA would hurt someone in the IT field? Assuming you're taking an Executive or Professional program, this is studying and networking during your off-hours and trying to better yourself.
    What TechGuru said is true

    I'll also add, because it's an expensive degree, so you're losing money & time. The networking in the MBA that you do won't help you in IT jobs, most students aren't in IT and those who are in IT usually want to change careers or move up. It's not the best investment if your goal is to be a network engineer, or a senior network engineer, for example.

    Executive programs (from good schools) are only open for people who are already directors/executives, so it's not for professionals.
    Goal: MBA, March 2020
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    #38
    Quote Originally Posted by UnixGuy View Post
    It doesn't help in getting an IT job, quite the opposite, it might work against you. It sure can help you get a consulting job though. Good MBAs have on campus recruitment, did you try that?
    Nothing like that existed. I was at one of those for profit schools that actually had on ground classes. I went to this school because it was military friendly and more than a few people I knew were getting their degrees there.
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    #39
    Quote Originally Posted by UnixGuy View Post
    What TechGuru said is true

    I'll also add, because it's an expensive degree, so you're losing money & time. The networking in the MBA that you do won't help you in IT jobs, most students aren't in IT and those who are in IT usually want to change careers or move up. It's not the best investment if your goal is to be a network engineer, or a senior network engineer, for example.

    Executive programs (from good schools) are only open for people who are already directors/executives, so it's not for professionals.
    As far as I am concerned this is a scientific law.
    Last edited by DatabaseHead; 09-17-2018 at 01:48 PM.
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