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  1. Senior Member
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    Unhappy What jobs can I get with a Management Information Systems degree?

    I graduated with a degree in IT Management (Management of Information Systems).

    It's half Business and half IT related.

    Could some experts here suggest specific job titles suitable for this kind of degree?

    I've been job hunting for 3 months for "Business Systems Analyst" jobs but it seems like it is geared towards someone with 3-5+ years of work experience. As a recent graduate, it is very difficult to find job posting suitable to my skills with half Business and half IT. Most job postings are either for 1) pure technical ppl or 2) pure business side. I have applied for tech support jobs. But, these roles also require a wide range of technical knowledge (from operating systems, to servers, to networks, to all kinds of stuff). Again, I am not too tech savvy. At the same time, I'm not a business person. I am very confused right now.

    I have done two co-op work terms as a database guy doing simple work (uploading files/transfering documents around, edited content, and more like admin stuff). I also had a job for a few months where i had to assist people with computers (basic troubleshoot-can't turn on the monitor, freezing issues, web browser pop up blockers, reset 15 computers at the same time), help people register using PIN code). Even a high school student can do this.

    I am totally lost and I don't want to go back and do retail jobs. I have also applied to IT Volunteer jobs in the community. The sad part is that they don't even reply to my email.

    advice? thank you for taking your time to read my post.
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  3. 1 of the Cool Kidz!!! BradleyHU's Avatar
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    #2
    if you want to do Business Analyst, you just need to look for entry level positions, or look @ QA Analyst too
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  4. Senior Member
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    #3
    Ahh Business Analysts...the "I run reports all day about systems I have no clue how to operate" job.


    Quote Originally Posted by laptop View Post
    I graduated with a degree in IT Management (Management of Information Systems).

    It's half Business and half IT related.

    Again, I am not too tech savvy. At the same time, I'm not a business person. I am very confused right now.
    .
    Do you not see the issue with this?

    Why did you get a degree in technology management if you arent a "technical" or "managerial" person?
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  5. Senior Member sambuca69's Avatar
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    #4
    A lot of bigger companies have roles sort of like what you may be looking for. They are usually called something like, IT Relationship Manager, Client Relationship Manager, IT Service Manager, etc.

    Basically, these are people with some tech and some business skills. They usually provide feedback back to the business (IT) on what the users would like, create "relationships" with the users, etc. Look up some job descriptions and see if that sort of thing is up your alley.
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  6. working on LPI and S+
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    #5
    I have a 4 year degree in Computer Information Systems. Business programming such as Cobol, ADA, etc..... I also have a two year degree in Computer Science.

    I could not find a entry-level job in programming however I was wanted and hired as a entry-level programmer who never really programmed.

    I came along at the beginning of the desktop revolution and was really doing computer hardware technician work, application support and some automation of workstation applications.

    I then moved into job titles such as Office Automation Analyst, Computer Programmer Analyst. Then moving into a Net Admin role.

    I've moved away from what I thought I would be doing with my 4 year/2 year degrees into more of a System Administration role.

    When I graduated it took me 8 months to find my 1st job out of college. And I would assume this rule may still hold today. Just keep updating and refining your resume and working to get more interviews. Eventually you will land something.

    With you saying you are not a business or technical person this concerns me about a couple of things.

    1. Why did you choose this degree? Did you like your course of studies?
    2. You lack experience and this will show quickly in an interview

    Are you applying for the right jobs?

    Does you college provide assistance in job search?

    Try to find a part-time job. Can you get a job at your college or university?

    Most important thing is DON'T GIVE UP.
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  7. Lambda Lambda Lambda JockVSJock's Avatar
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    #6
    Hey man, I feel your pain.

    I too have one of those MIS degrees, and kind of feel like a sucker. Was told that this degree would get all types of experience in college and would have all these companies beating down my door to hire me.

    Neither happened.

    If you want to head down the path of IT certification, congrads, your in the right place. Hang out and start reading to get a feel of what is going on.

    As for a new job, kind of in the same boat as all of us. The economy is tanked and may turn around...

    Not sure what your age is, however another mistake I made was not going in the military where you can get tons of experience as well.
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  8. Senior Member
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    #7
    With the obvious exception of some fields that require a particular degree to obtain the job (doctors, etc...) the degree doesn't designate what kind of job you can get. You are the sole responsible party for determining exactly what kind of job you desire and what kind of job you get.

    In your post, you seem to highlight what kind of job you think your degree would allow you to obtain. Throw that thinking out the window and ask yourself what it is you want to be doing. Once you know what it is you want to be doing, let us know and we can make some suggestions on how to work towards that goal.
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    #8
    I would disagree, especially these days, many job posts are requesting degrees in a specific area.

    IMO, a MIS degree is good for a person who is seeking a management level job in IT. It is for the person who is already employed, and needs that piece of paper to move up to the next tier. I remember seeing some articles stating that having a degree similar to a MIS indicates to the bosses that you understand the business side of IT, you should be able to effectively communicate to leadership, how IT effects the business.
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  10. Senior Member
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by msteinhilber View Post
    With the obvious exception of some fields that require a particular degree to obtain the job (doctors, etc...) the degree doesn't designate what kind of job you can get. You are the sole responsible party for determining exactly what kind of job you desire and what kind of job you get.

    In your post, you seem to highlight what kind of job you think your degree would allow you to obtain. Throw that thinking out the window and ask yourself what it is you want to be doing. Once you know what it is you want to be doing, let us know and we can make some suggestions on how to work towards that goal.
    Quoted for truth.

    Also, just because a job posting says "XYZ level degree in Computer Science" or another field, doesn't mean they wont take a similar degere in a different field. In most cases they probably would.
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  11. Senior Member
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by SephStorm View Post
    I would disagree, especially these days, many job posts are requesting degrees in a specific area.
    The problem with IT related degree's IMO is there are so many various varieties. Programs differ between schools significantly too, one might walk out of a school with a MIS degree from one place that has an entirely different curriculum than another school. For an employer to request a specific type of degree for an IT related job to me would indicate that the particular degree the HR person or other hiring manager listed on the job posting thought that was the generally accepted IT related degree - not that they are requesting a specific degree. Hiring managers can't keep track of all of the particular types of degrees out there, there are far too many. Most listings in my area are typically either "IT related degree" or simply Computer Science. If an employer had a position available that required such a level of specialization from one's degree choice, I would suspect that there would be better criteria to look at from candidates than their degree choice (such as certifications related to the specific area as well as experience).

    I stand firmly behind the statement that a degree in a related field is going to do just as well as any other IT related degree as long as you have all of the other traits that an employer is looking for and you are good at marketing yourself. When it comes down to looking for the best candidates for a specialized position, there are far better determining factors to look at on a candidates resume than the type of degree they selected - at least in the IT industry at the bachelor's level.
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  12. Audentis Fortuna Iuvat veritas_libertas's Avatar
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by msteinhilber View Post
    The problem with IT related degree's IMO is there are so many various varieties. Programs differ between schools significantly too, one might walk out of a school with a MIS degree from one place that has an entirely different curriculum than another school.
    I think this is entirely way to common. The IT field needs to come together on some sort of agreement about this. The only degree that seems to even be predictable is a Computer Science degree. I do have some hope that the NSA/DoD is going to put pressure on IT Security degrees to have more similarity, but I wouldn't bet on it.
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  13. Sith Lord SephStorm's Avatar
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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by msteinhilber View Post
    The problem with IT related degree's IMO is there are so many various varieties. Programs differ between schools significantly too, one might walk out of a school with a MIS degree from one place that has an entirely different curriculum than another school. For an employer to request a specific type of degree for an IT related job to me would indicate that the particular degree the HR person or other hiring manager listed on the job posting thought that was the generally accepted IT related degree - not that they are requesting a specific degree. Hiring managers can't keep track of all of the particular types of degrees out there, there are far too many. Most listings in my area are typically either "IT related degree" or simply Computer Science. If an employer had a position available that required such a level of specialization from one's degree choice, I would suspect that there would be better criteria to look at from candidates than their degree choice (such as certifications related to the specific area as well as experience).

    I stand firmly behind the statement that a degree in a related field is going to do just as well as any other IT related degree as long as you have all of the other traits that an employer is looking for and you are good at marketing yourself. When it comes down to looking for the best candidates for a specialized position, there are far better determining factors to look at on a candidates resume than the type of degree they selected - at least in the IT industry at the bachelor's level.
    Consider this, if a person has a degree in IT (no specialization) what are the chances that they get hired for a NetAdmin or security job? Unless they have relevant experience in the field in which they are applying, they are a step behind the guy who has been studying IT Security or Network Administration. Thats what I see the HR team seeing.
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  14. Senior Member t3ch_guru's Avatar
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    #13
    I graduated with the same degree and landed a job as a LAN Administrator. The thing is I did intern with the company. But I guess your only problem is you are not a very technical person. I been doing this since I was 8. This website is definitely a good start like other have stated. I also like business a lot, so I went the MIS route. In my opinion a good degree to help you get in route to becoming a CIO.

    But, I know a lot of people who got the same degree and are not very technical. They went the Business Analyst route. Check to see if your college has a Internship program or something. Lockeed Martin is big in my area.
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  15. Senior Member
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    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by SephStorm View Post
    Consider this, if a person has a degree in IT (no specialization) what are the chances that they get hired for a NetAdmin or security job? Unless they have relevant experience in the field in which they are applying, they are a step behind the guy who has been studying IT Security or Network Administration. Thats what I see the HR team seeing.
    The chances are very slim regardless of the degree the person has when they do not have the relevant experience. While it happens from time to time, certifications and schooling of any variety are not likely to land you a network administrator job or security job straight away.
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  16. Senior Member
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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by sambuca69 View Post
    A lot of bigger companies have roles sort of like what you may be looking for. They are usually called something like, IT Relationship Manager, Client Relationship Manager, IT Service Manager, etc.

    Basically, these are people with some tech and some business skills. They usually provide feedback back to the business (IT) on what the users would like, create "relationships" with the users, etc. Look up some job descriptions and see if that sort of thing is up your alley.
    While IT-related degrees are still useful, business skillsets are becoming increasingly in demand for IT employees. Even though I enjoy working in IT, I had been pursuing a business degree until recently because of this. If you don't believe me, read the trade rags.
    Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there.
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  17. Senior Member
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    #16
    As was to be expected, in Dominican Republic, the IT job market is following the US market trends. A little cousin came to me asking for advice about career paths and he told me he wanted a computer engineering degree. I advice him to not do it, and instead pick a Business degree (marketing, B.A., economics) and while he completes it, start working toward IT certifications. The Bachelor's degree is his investment in long term results, while the experience and IT certifications would be his key to IT and what actually would help him get to the field he wants to be working in.

    The problem with that approach in the USA is that based exclusively in economics, it would be hard for a business graduate to stick with a IT job, because a business graduate usually makes a lot more than what a 23-24 year old makes in IT., but your mileage may vary. Here in DR that is not a problem because usually an Bachelor's in IT generally makes more than somebody with a business degree right out of college. If you are willing to sacrifice low term results for being in the field you love, which in the long term wshould provide you greater satisfaction than anything else, I think the Business degree and IT certifications and getting started in the field with any entry level position to get experience, is the best way to go.

    The only situation where I see an IT related bachelor's worth pursuing is when you want to be a programmer. That is solely based in my impressions and some homework I've done in the past two years when I decided to change careers. Ther eis abig problem with IT degrees, and it is that most universities lack the ability and agility to move, change and adapt their degrees at the pace the IT field moves. That renders a lot of IT degrees obsolete way too fast.

    AS other posters have said, the way you, OP, described yourself is a little troubling and I think career advice would be a sound investment for you. You have a degree that is supposed to train you and make you savvy, but not an specialist, in both business and technology. You feel you are neither and sound like neither of them are your things.

    You need to define what it is you want to do. Even when you might end up not working in the field you are already trained in, Dont think of your investments of time and money as wasted because they are not. Dont feel you need to stay in the field because of such investments in it. I dont know your age but t is a fact that you will have a better career in the field that you feel passionate about if you go after it than if you stick to the one you chose becuase of w/e reasons WHEN YOU WERE 17-19 years old.

    Your degree wont be a wasted time in you change careers as i said. There are a lot of skills that you learned that will be with you forever. A lot of them are valid and very useful in any field that you decide to get. Just think about what it is you want to do and get to it. I did what seems to be the most time consuming Bachelors degree in my country and I did it because I didnt want to change careers when I only had 8 courses passed. It was a big mistake but I decided to correct it...8 years later. . But everytime I pick a Cisco book I get so excited that I know this is what I should be doing. I think everybody must try to find something that makes you feel like that.

    Sorry for the long post. I felt I had to tell you OP.
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  18. Senior Member
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    #17
    Thanks for everybody's advice. I read everything.

    I am trying to get into the technical side and I am currently studying for CompTIA A+. I really like to become a Network Analyst but I know it won't happen like magic as everyone started off in help desk support (unless there is luck or connections). I think my short term goal is to master CompTIA A+, MCDST, and work in support for a few years then slowly move into the network side. Then, I will prepare for Network+ and slowly get into CCENT. I will be 25 years old this year and I feel very behind than my classmates.

    Now, I have a confusing situation coming up. Recently, I applied for a "volunteer" position at an IT company and they invited me to an interview. I am 70% sure that they will hire me as a volunteer.

    At the same time, I started to ask people for help recently. The hiring manager will call me soon for some tech support job -paid job (although not guaranteed as of yet).

    Should I go for the volunteer position if they hire me? Then go with the flow and quit the volunteer position immediately if I find the full time position? I'm not familar with situations like this because I usually like to build connection. Advice?

    Thanks
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  19. Senior Member
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    #18
    My thoughts are simply that, dont take it as advice. I think a certification like A+ is overkill in your case, because of your degree. I mmight be off but I assume that employers must understand that you already know very well the A+ curriculum given that you have a MIS degree.

    If I were you I would be trying to get one or two "associate level" certifications to help me define the path that I want to finally master. I honestly dont think a lot of low level certifications will do much good, other than opening a few more doors to entry level jobs.

    You need to get whatever you can find at this point. Experience is necessary to move up. I had an amazing interview the other day and I was not given the job because the hiring manager required some experience. It was a Jr. Network Engineer position for probably the best Cisco Partner in the caribbean that I would've taken as an intership without pay. You really need to start working in the first thing that comes up. You should never wait for an opportunity that might never come. That is especially right with the current economy and job market.

    Good luck.
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  20. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #19

    Default 39yrs old

    Hello,

    I have a question. I am 39yrs old and I am currently in school. My major is MIS and I would like to minor in Marketing. I have read all of your posts in regard to the young man who was frustrated about having his MIS degree and is not able to get a job, unlike him I have a genuine interest in business and IT. I feel that having the knowledge of both would be an great advantage. I have worked in the IT industry but only on the administrative side nothing hands on. I guess my question would be are there many jobs out there for people with MIS degrees, or would majoring in General business and having MIS as a minor the better way to go, or for that matter, majoring in Marketing and having MIS as a minor a better option?
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  21. Senior Member phantasm's Avatar
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    #20
    Quote Originally Posted by c@pricorn39 View Post
    Hello,

    I have a question. I am 39yrs old and I am currently in school. My major is MIS and I would like to minor in Marketing. I have read all of your posts in regard to the young man who was frustrated about having his MIS degree and is not able to get a job, unlike him I have a genuine interest in business and IT. I feel that having the knowledge of both would be an great advantage. I have worked in the IT industry but only on the administrative side nothing hands on. I guess my question would be are there many jobs out there for people with MIS degrees, or would majoring in General business and having MIS as a minor the better way to go, or for that matter, majoring in Marketing and having MIS as a minor a better option?
    Start your own thread man... it'll get confusing otherwise.
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  22. Senior Member nhan.ng's Avatar
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    #21
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMR View Post
    My thoughts are simply that, dont take it as advice. I think a certification like A+ is overkill in your case, because of your degree. I mmight be off but I assume that employers must understand that you already know very well the A+ curriculum given that you have a MIS degree.
    i dont think this is the case. You'll only get hand on computer experience with computer at a technical schools. Everywhere else you learn theories based on outdated books. With A+/net+/Sec+ he'll be able to land an entry level job and work his way up.

    If I were you I would be trying to get one or two "associate level" certifications to help me define the path that I want to finally master. I honestly dont think a lot of low level certifications will do much good, other than opening a few more doors to entry level jobs.
    it's harder nowaday for pple with no certs, fresh out of college to compete with people with certs, experience for the same job. You'll need to start out low and work your way up. Manager wont let you into managing something without proven working experience.
    Last edited by nhan.ng; 05-15-2011 at 11:41 PM.
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    #22
    Quote Originally Posted by petedude View Post
    While IT-related degrees are still useful, business skillsets are becoming increasingly in demand for IT employees. Even though I enjoy working in IT, I had been pursuing a business degree until recently because of this. If you don't believe me, read the trade rags.
    Trade rags???

    Are you talking about this

    Trade Rags

    ???
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    #23
    BUMP

    I would like to bump this old thread. As a recent graduate with a degree in MIS (BSBA:MIS) I am having an extremeley difficult time finding any type of job that is related to my area of study. A lot of people will chime in on boards like these and say things like "apply to the jobs that interest you" or "well it depends on which path you want to take" but the fact of the matter is, at this point, in this economy I am looking for ANYWAY to break into the field. I am not entirley sure which path I want to go down (though I think an MIS degree would be well suited down the line for someone in a particular branch of InfoSec, which interests me) because in reality, I haven't got my hands dirty enough outside of school to see what really interests me.

    I have been applying to mainly Desktop/HelpDesk positions because I feel that this is my BEST entry point to the market, but I am having no luck. They always say they love my personality and overall intelligence, but lack the technical experience.

    The problem I am seeing, is that a CS major is better suited for these lower entry-level jobs like Desktop/Helpdesk right out of the gate. MIS is geared more towards System/Business Analyst (which can mean anything today), Project Management, System Admin, etc. It prepares you for the mid-level/high-level positions, positions that all require YEARS of practical experience. Aspects of project management interest me, but you aren't going to find any entry level PM jobs anyway. I have looked at entry level BA positions, though they are rare, but even these can sometimes be completley non-tech related.

    I just want to make sure that I am going about things the right way by looking at Desktop/Helpdesk as my entry point, and that based on my major, I shouldn't be looking elsewhere. I have even had tech recruiters ask me, "well why would someone in MIS be wanting to get into Helpdesk considering the major is suited for project managent" and my response is the obvious. Experience. I know I want to work in this industry, and some generic Business Administration type of role, but the problem is getting in.

    I am currently studying for the A+, and the material seems elementary, but maybe having the cert on a resume will simply prove I have the basic technical skills.

    Any advice/motivation appreciated.
    Last edited by burfect; 01-31-2013 at 07:32 PM.
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    #24
    Burfect: I definitely get where you're coming from on this and it's almost as though MIS degrees are mostly useful for those that already have a good level of experience and are looking to advance into management.

    Starting in helpdesk/desktop support is a valid path to take but you'll really need to get some more technical skills first outside of what you learned in your degree. A+ is a good start, Microsoft exam 70-680 Windows 7 Configuring would also be great for someone looking for technical experience, or Security+ will often help you in the door(and get a foot in InfoSec).

    Personally I did a few years of Desktop Support while getting my MIS degree, then was able to move to a Systems Administration position based mostly on my technical experience, not my degree. I'd like to move into a more managerial at which point my education and technical experience would be the combination that would land me a job.

    Basically at this point do anything you can to get technical knowledge and experience. In your position I'd be studying 8-10 hours a day to knock out some entry level certs as quick as I could.
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    #25
    Thanks for the response, appreciate it.

    I work full time as well in a non-related (which started as an IT assistant) field. I am going to try and obtain the A+ as fast as possible and then go from there, maybe n+/s+ or perhaps straight to MCSA, though the thing that bothers me about the 680 is that it can't be applied/used anywhere in the new MCSE exams, and it also seems a ton of desktop/HD jobs want you to have exp with AD. I know I don't want to stay in Desktop, but I know (I think) it's my best way to get into the field.

    I think a lot of what was markted to us while in school was that we would end up in positions acting as the "bridge" between IT and business in roles such as a BA/SA, and that we would not need the focus of intense "technical" knowledge. This is really not a concern to me because I have ALWAYS been interested in the technical side of things, but I do think the way they market the MIS is somewhat misleading. "Your not a hardcore programmer or a techie, but you have core business skills and core technical skills to be that bridge" when in actuality no one is going to hire you without those technical skills.

    I will say some of the SA job descriptions I look at seem DAUNTING. I also often seem to find a lot of the skills required for these roles seem to be VERY specific to the tools/programs that specific company uses, which I find somewhat confusing.

    Thanks again, and appreciate any additonal feedback.
    Last edited by burfect; 01-31-2013 at 08:17 PM.
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