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  1. Senior Member aderon's Avatar
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    #26
    Also to answer expiring questions. The Linux+ doesn't expire. The LPIC-1 does expire after 5 years if you don't renew it.
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    #27
    Certifications without alignment, experience, market needs, marketing generally have low ROI. Not saying this is the case with Linux +, but I feel if you are lacking those core components the certification has low return.
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  4. Hyperthreaded Swift6's Avatar
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    #28
    Vendor/proprietary certs are more recognised and respected in the industry e.g. Cisco, Microsoft, VMware to name a few.
    Recruiters are looking for folk who have experience and certified on the technologies they have.

    Vendor neutral certs on the other hand are valuable but probably not be as highly praised/recognised. Hence ROI may not be as high.
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  5. Member
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    #29
    Quote Originally Posted by aderon View Post
    Also to answer expiring questions. The Linux+ doesn't expire. The LPIC-1 does expire after 5 years if you don't renew it.

    I contacted Comptia directly, they stated the cert is lifetime even though the current exams are expiring.
    Last edited by cowill; 04-21-2015 at 02:11 PM.
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  6. Member
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    #30
    Quote Originally Posted by aderon View Post
    Applied to a job that wanted networking/linux experience. Got an interview. Failed miserably.

    Got my Linux+ and reapplied. Passed the interview and was hired. So for me I feel like it was worth it.

    Now could I have gotten the job without the cert? Yeah, absolutely. But you could say that with about almost any certification. As long as you're learning from the cert rather than just getting it to tack onto your resume, then I think there will always be some sort of ROI.

    As far as the cert having some sort of intrinsic value in and of itself? No, not really. I don't think any employer sees the Linux+ and just instantly thinks "This guy is a must have!" And unless the company specifically asks in the posting for people who are Linux+ certified, then I don't think it has much bargaining value either. But, the knowledge you get from the cert can definitely help you answer interview questions that could potentially land you an entry level Linux role.
    I guess this is my point.....You can get the cert and apply for a job that may not be directly related to Linux administration. Linux is all over the place.....you may not even be a sys admin........you may apply for a InfoSec role and the Linux+ may put you over the top..or Web Dev.....or in aderon's case, networking/linux.....
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  7. Member
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    #31
    Quote Originally Posted by NetworkNewb View Post
    How much harder do you guys think the RHCSA is than the Linux+? To someone with very limited Linux experience. I can't imagine it would take that much longer to study for RHCSA right?

    Here is some job board results of Linux certs

    Attachment 6567

    Good post.......thanks....
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  8. Member
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    #32
    Quote Originally Posted by The_Expert View Post
    I personally believe the Linux+ is a great investment. Why?

    1. You get two real certs for the price of one. CompTIA Linux+ and the LPIC-1 Certification. Granted, no one has heard of the Linux Professional Institute (LPI) before... but listing, two Linux certs on a resume can help. It certainly got me noticed!

    2. If you take the learning process seriously - you can learn a ton of great stuff about Linux. Plenty to get you started on using Linux more on a daily basis.

    3. The Linux+ currently does not expire. The LPIC-1 expires after 5 years.

    4. Differentiate yourself from all the other job candidates who don't have a Linux cert listed on their resume.


    Now, I agree with others that the RedHat Certification track would be the way to go for the serious Linux admin - however, why not take the Linux+ as a first step to see if you like it?
    Agreed 100%
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  9. Junior Member
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    #33
    I think the ROI is the knowledge that you learn from getting the exam. It's hard to really gain "experience" if no one will give you the time of day to get the experience. Honestly, I'm trying to move from service desk (even though I've been desktop support this jobs pays more) into junior level system admin. I've gotten an MCTS for Windows (btw the 70-680 is extremely hard) and am working on Linux+ and then MCSA: Windows 2012 R2. Is any employer REALLY going to hire me as a junior admin right from the service desk without having these certs on my resume? I extremely doubt it, unless they were some crappy company who is going to gouge my pay anyways. I started on a weird path as an Apple Certified Macintosh Technician and got hands on OS/Hardware troubleshooting and repair for years, probably more repair hours than most desktop support people in enterprise due to working for Apple, but I kept getting crap in interviews for not having "Microsoft experience" so I hopped off, got on the service desk and got promoted to desktop support in 3 months. I don't deploy Microsoft OS, but can I walk into an interview and answer their questions about what switches to use in sysprep to audit an image before capturing? Sure. If you're going to spend all of your time busting you butt to learn an OS, at least get a paper to go along with it to back you up.
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