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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Default Linux+ or/and LPIC-1 and 2

    Hi guys,

    I am a Linux+ certified, and I was thinking in taking the LPI LPIC-1 and 2 certifications.

    Is LPI a "recognized" organization? Do you guys recommend their certifications? Do you recommend having both (compTIA + LPI)?

    Well, any feedback on the subject would be appreciated!

    Thanks!

    Agus.
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  3. Senior Member TeKniques's Avatar
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    #2
    I don't have any of those certs, but from what I have heard from others and friends is that LPI is the real deal for Linux certs. The RHCE would be the premier, but the LPI is very respectable from what I have heard.

    I guess the best thing to do would be to check out their website and have a look around.
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  4. Member
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    #3
    Recently I have passed the both, first Linux+ and then LPIC 1. LPIC is more popular, authoritative, and a bit difficult one than Linux+. They have reviewed their style and made tests harder than ever.

    Linux+ is by choice, as you know? LPIC often lets you write a proper command, config file, or path. So accurate knowledge is a must. Like A+, LPIC needs achieving 2 subjects, say, LPIC 101 and 102. My 102 offered 73 questions in 90 minutes and nearly half of questions were written. The breakpoing is 500 out of 900 but it is said that gaining over 600 looks tough. For youre reference, see below

    LPIC Canada: https://www.lpi.org/en/home.html
    IBM LPIC Prep material: http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/lpi
    RedHat material: http://www.faqs.org/docs/securing/

    I plan for LPIC 20x series but will have to go back to the Penguin world again.

    Regards
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  5. Senior Member
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    #4
    Hi everyone!

    Thanks for your feedback... LPIC looks like a challenge!

    Gennosuke, what do you mean by "half of questions were written"? Isn't the exam multiple choice like Linux+? Could you give me more details on how is the exam structured?

    Cheers!
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  6. Member
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by agustinchernitsky
    Isn't the exam multiple choice like Linux+?
    Dear agustinchernitsky,

    Half Yes, half No Okay, I show you samples. Answer below

    1. Kernel is tuned up right. What do you do next for dependency?

    2. You want to change a primary group for user X, write a command with a proper option

    3. Show chains for NAT filtering with what?

    4. Write a config file for man

    5. Where outgoing mails are saved?

    101 had less than 10 but 102 nearly half something like that.

    Regards
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  7. Senior Member
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    #6
    Hi Gennosuke,

    I see what you mean... it's interesting... and looks challenging... I LIKE IT.

    Its a good way to really test the knowledge of someone...

    Thanks for the info!
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  8. Member
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    #7
    Dear agustinchernitsky,

    1. /sbin/depmod -a
    2. /sbin/usermod -g group user
    3. /usr/sbin/iptables -t nat -L # probably "ipchains" okay
    4. /etc/man.config
    5. /var/spool/mqueue

    My 102 score below was 650, couldn't reach 700. 101 also 650.

    kernel: 80%
    Boot, initialization, Shutdown, Runlevels: 100%
    Printing: 100%
    Documentation: 83%
    Shells, Scripting, Programming, Compiling:83%
    Administrative Tasks: 93%
    Network Fundamentals: 80%
    Network Services: 83%
    Security: 83%

    Looking forward to your challenge and success

    Regards
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  9. Senior Member
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    #8
    Hello Gennosuke!

    Sorry, I didn't get that you wanted the answers

    But yes I knew them... IPCHAINS is obsolete for the 2.4 and 2.6 kernels, I would go with iptables. I learnt a lot compiling Gentoo... and many years of working with that distro really gets you rolling.

    Still, Gentoo is quite different from other distros (for servers is the best)... I think that for the exam I will use a more "standard" distro.. What do you think?
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  10. Member
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    #9
    Dear agustinchernitsky,

    Never mind I didn't want the answers. I've never tried Gentoo so say anything assertive. The least is, if Gentoo followed System-V architecture, you would be okay. RedHat, Debian, Suse, Mandrake and more apply the scheme for boot, daemon, and network managements. These form a defacto standard. LPIC separated RedHat and Debian before but joined them together. RedHat and similarities look to be dominant

    Gentoo uses a unique "portage" command for package management, right? I am afraid this is not yet authorized in Linux+. Rpm and dpkg should be imperative even though the weight is small in exam.

    I had choosen distro for the purpose. For server, Slackware was best for me. I used to cook a custom server from scratch. For client, RedHat, Suse, or Mandrake or whichever except awful Debian. My 1st encounter with dpkg had been nightmarish. For Linux+ learning dpkg options was still painful for me.

    Good luck
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  11. Senior Member
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    #10
    Hello Gennosuke,

    Well, Gentoo is a great thing... I recommend you to try it out. Its a sort of "autmated linux from scrach" distro. As you correctly stated, Gentoo uses Portage and portage actually has the make and configure commands stored in many files (called the portage tree).

    Basically, you boot from a live CD, partition the discs, and install a bootstrap tar ball. Then you configure the make.conf, where you specify all the "GCC optimization options" and the "procesor optimization options" and start the built.... portage downloads the tarballs compiles them and installs them... and voila! You have a linux distro compiled for your hardware... and let me tell you... runs like hell! Ive never seen something so fast...

    Still, it has all configuration files and many other things in different paths... and for the exams sake, I prefere staying within standards!

    If you try it, let me know how it feels! By the way, you really learn a lot by doing that install

    saludos my friend!
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  12. Member
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    #11
    Dear agustinchernitsky,

    Thank you for your note on Gentoo Linux. I will try.

    Hasta la vista, amigo
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