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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Default Best version for newbies

    What is the best version of Linux for newbies to learn on?

    I have a feeling I will get many different answers to this one, but I'm looking for a general consensus, if that is even possible.

    Someone told me Slackware is Linux in it's purest form. Any ideas?
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  3. Senior Member
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    #2
    Have you looked at knoppix, you can burn it to a cd, and run it without having to install it on your current system. It's certainly not the greatest, but it'll help you get a feel for how linux works
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  4. Senior Member
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    #3
    But which version will make me a linux GOD???
    I heard Slackware is the purest form.
    What about Red Hat?
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  5. Grumpy old bugger RussS's Avatar
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    #4
    Take you pic. If you are going to be a *nix god the distro doesnt really matter too much as you won't be using much of it anyways as you will be recompiling most things to suit and will be in text mode only.
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  6. Senior Member
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    #5
    Thanks. I'm leaning towards Red Hat. It appears to be the most popular option.
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  7. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #6
    The latest Redhat Linux editions are not offered free anymore, the Redhat Enterprise Linux is $179....

    You might want to try Fedora instead, it is an initiative of Redhat, and is available as a free download.

    fedora.redhat.com
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  8. Senior Member
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    #7
    Cool. I found most of the older versions of various Lixux platforms @
    www.linuxiso.org too. Thanks for the help.
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  9. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #8
    Yeah, you could go for an 'older' version of RedHat, I noticed they call those legacy Redhat Linux by now. Note that these end-of-life editions and are not supported and updated anymore (at least not by redhat's RPMs).
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  10. Junior Member
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    #9
    I agree with Webmaster - Fedora is good, Core 2 has just been released and I have just installed it with only a minor issue. I have also tried mandrake10 and SuSE, both of which are good also.
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