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  1. Member
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    #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Northbr1dge View Post
    That's the first time I've seen the almighty "Unfakeable" Linux mentioned in the thread, even if it is just in reference. Is there a reason why Red Hat isn't more popular amongst you guys, instead of Fedora and CentOS? Besides cost, that is.

    Back on track, I really want to like Fedora, I really do. I ALWAYS have issues installing simple things like swfdec / flash, to the point I get frustrated and reinstall Ubuntu. I attribute that mostly to *nix inexperience though
    Well, the reason is probably that Redhat is not "really" free. You can access the software repository but not the OS itself (AFAIK). That's what CentOS does, if you configure yum to use the original RedHat sources you can build a complete copy. The OS itself is nice, but I only use default stuff. Like installing some server and then working on the configs rather than work on the system itself. I once read through the part, how to build a custom kernel and was fed up already (that looked quiet complicated to me to work around all those default things in the kernel).
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  3. Senior Member
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    #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Northbr1dge View Post
    Is there a reason why Red Hat isn't more popular amongst you guys, instead of Fedora and CentOS? Besides cost, that is.
    Cost is the biggest factor. CentOS also lets you skip the RHN registration process. I have nothing against RedHat, and have recommended license purchases to customers who wanted the extra support that a RHEL subscription brings. They keep a lot of Linux developers on the payroll so buying a subscription is a way of giving back.
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  4. Alligator wrestler Moderator Plantwiz's Avatar
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    #53
    Collect them all

    The LiveCD List
    Plantwiz
    _____
    "Grammar and spelling aren't everything, but this is a forum, not a chat room. You have plenty of time to spell out the word "you", and look just a little bit smarter." by Phaideaux

    ***I'll add you can Capitalize the word 'I' to show a little respect for yourself too.

    'i' before 'e' except after 'c'.... weird?
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  5. Senior Member
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    #54
    My favorite really depends on what I'm doing.

    My laptop is a Mac, so I like MacOS X for it. When I'm running linux on a workstation, it's usually Ubuntu (I hate Fedora with a passion). Ubuntu is quick, easy and more or less brainless for me, it has almost everything I need out of the box, so I can spend more time doing the work I need the workstation to do, instead of working on making the workstation work (somewhere, my grammar teacher is having a conniption fit for that sentence...)

    For a server, it again depends on what the role is. The majority of the time, it's going to be Debian. The rest of the time, it's going to be CentOS (usually when I need LDAP running.... Debian screwed the pooch on their OpenLDAP package when they started linking it against gnutls instead of openssl, made it a much bigger pain in the neck to deal with than it should have been).

    Basically, my favorite Linux OS is the best one for the job I need Linux doing, and that's not distribution dependant
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  6. Senior Member stephens316's Avatar
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    #55
    I am running BackTrack 4 with VmWare Windows 7P image.
    ______________
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    | OSCP]
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  7. Senior Member e24ohm's Avatar
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    #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Forsaken_GA View Post
    My favorite really depends on what I'm doing.

    My laptop is a Mac, so I like MacOS X for it. When I'm running linux on a workstation, it's usually Ubuntu (I hate Fedora with a passion). Ubuntu is quick, easy and more or less brainless for me, it has almost everything I need out of the box, so I can spend more time doing the work I need the workstation to do, instead of working on making the workstation work (somewhere, my grammar teacher is having a conniption fit for that sentence...)

    For a server, it again depends on what the role is. The majority of the time, it's going to be Debian. The rest of the time, it's going to be CentOS (usually when I need LDAP running.... Debian screwed the pooch on their OpenLDAP package when they started linking it against gnutls instead of openssl, made it a much bigger pain in the neck to deal with than it should have been).

    Basically, my favorite Linux OS is the best one for the job I need Linux doing, and that's not distribution dependant
    Just curious, but why do you hate Fedora so much?
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  8. Senior Member e24ohm's Avatar
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    #57
    Desktop - Ubuntu

    Network Utilitiy machine - Fedora - just for: snort, kismet and wireshark "think i have nagios and cacti on it at my work"

    Server - CentOS
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  9. Junior Member
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    #58
    Been running Ubuntu on my desktop (now netbook) for about 4 years. Well scents Edgy at lest. Before that used Slackware. I am looking in to maybe going to Backtrack 4 here soon.

    I think it was the pre-made packages that made me switch. Got to lazy to compile every thing my self.
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  10. Member rage_hog's Avatar
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    #59
    I use BT4 final.
    EOF
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  11. linux addict marco71's Avatar
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    #60
    I'm SuSE user since the distro was owned by SUSE GmbH, before Novell (I started with SuSE Pro 7.1, follwed by v8.1, v9.1, v9.2, v9.3 and OpenSUSE)...
    also used Debian since version potato 2.2r7, followed by Woody (3.0), Etch (4.0), Lenny (5.0) ... and still using Debian -unstable (Sid) on two notebooks ... the third has OpenSUSE 11.2
    ... and used tons of other linux distros, more debian-like and slackware-like (the list is too long to be mentioned here), but my favorite distro remains Slackware, which replaced forever Windows on my desktop, ten yrs. ago :P
    for servers, I prefer CentOS (branch 5, of course, also used branch 4 a lot), but also managed SLES v10 and RHEL v4 AS/v5 ES servers for customers

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  12. Junior Member casperz4's Avatar
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    #61
    I've used Mandriva, Backtrack, Fedora, Ubuntu, DSL, Redhat.
    I liked Mandriva
    I just finished a crash course in Linux. I found it hard to understand.
    A lot to remember
    It was suppose to prepare me for the cert... I think I better take it over again.
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  13. Junior Member
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    #62
    I'm running fedora core aka red hat on a old PPC based Powermac G4.
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  14. Senior Member
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    #63
    Quote Originally Posted by e24ohm View Post
    Just curious, but why do you hate Fedora so much?
    I don't like how much it differs from RHEL/CentOS, and I don't like the crap (or the amount of it) that it comes pre-packaged with. Running Fedora feels like running Windows to me, so yeah, not a fan.

    Ubuntu is getting pretty bad about the bloatware as well, but I'm more annoyed at them over the pulseaudio issues out of the box in the last few releases, they haven't tripped my 'I'm annoyed at having to deal with you' threshold yet. If they do, then I'll just go back to installing my work stations as barebones Debian systems and then just apt in what I want and be done with it.

    Lately though, I've been finding that Debian has made me lazy, it's just too easy. I'm thinking about going back to FreeBSD
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  15. Senior Member
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    #64
    Just butting in... I am not really a Linux user but I've always liked Fedora Core and SUSE but every time I use Linux, I've always had problems. Problems like can't do dual display and/or audio not working. *sighs*

    I use Ubuntu Linux Server 9.04 right now on my VMware running on top of my Server 2K3 for proxy, ssh, and WoL (Wake on LAN) purposes. Other than that, I don't do anything with it. Any ideas on what else I can use this VMware Linux box? I wanted to run OpenVPN on it but every time I search for a guide on how to configure it properly, I always have problems with it. The last time I installed it and configured, I had to use several guides and combined them to make it work. Though, not really sure if it actually works because when I finished it I wasn't able to find a VPN that supports SSL. I uninstalled it from my box and after few weeks that was when I was able to find a VPN client that supports SSL. Sucks big time! Oh well.
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  16. Cyber Ninja III rogue2shadow's Avatar
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    #65
    Desktop OS: Ubuntu
    Security: Backtrack4
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  17. Senior Member MentholMoose's Avatar
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    #66
    Quote Originally Posted by zerglings View Post
    Just butting in... I am not really a Linux user but I've always liked Fedora Core and SUSE but every time I use Linux, I've always had problems. Problems like can't do dual display and/or audio not working. *sighs*

    I use Ubuntu Linux Server 9.04 right now on my VMware running on top of my Server 2K3 for proxy, ssh, and WoL (Wake on LAN) purposes. Other than that, I don't do anything with it. Any ideas on what else I can use this VMware Linux box? I wanted to run OpenVPN on it but every time I search for a guide on how to configure it properly, I always have problems with it. The last time I installed it and configured, I had to use several guides and combined them to make it work. Though, not really sure if it actually works because when I finished it I wasn't able to find a VPN that supports SSL. I uninstalled it from my box and after few weeks that was when I was able to find a VPN client that supports SSL. Sucks big time! Oh well.
    You can try OpenVPN Access Server, it's way easier to use than the regular OpenVPN. You can get a 2-user license free, after that it's $5/user (minimum of a 10-user license required).
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  18. Senior Member
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    #67
    Quote Originally Posted by MentholMoose View Post
    You can try OpenVPN Access Server, it's way easier to use than the regular OpenVPN. You can get a 2-user license free, after that it's $5/user (minimum of a 10-user license required).

    pfSense is another way to get OpenVPN up and running "easily."
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  19. The Colosus of Clout Paul Boz's Avatar
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    #68
    I've been using CentOS 5 a lot lately. I'm trying to get better at Linux (its an important skill after all) and CentOS seems very well put together. It doesn't have any bloat and it hasn't made me want to shoot myself yet so that's a plus.
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  20. Senior Member
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    #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Boz View Post
    I've been using CentOS 5 a lot lately. I'm trying to get better at Linux (its an important skill after all) and CentOS seems very well put together. It doesn't have any bloat and it hasn't made me want to shoot myself yet so that's a plus.
    I've always thought the CentOS/Red Hat/Fedora tracks were always put together better than the Debian ones, at minimum better than the Ubuntu ones, Ubuntu has some really strange ideas for where files should reside at times...

    However, in reply to the topic, anything *nix based I'm good with (unless SCO are involved, at which point I would like to break the box it is on, and shoot every member of SCO)
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  21. Cyber Ninja L0gicB0mb508's Avatar
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    #70
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Boz View Post
    I've been using CentOS 5 a lot lately. I'm trying to get better at Linux (its an important skill after all) and CentOS seems very well put together. It doesn't have any bloat and it hasn't made me want to shoot myself yet so that's a plus.
    Cent is pretty pimp. I used it to build a lot of security geared servers (or appliances if you want to call them that) back in the day. It's also my weapon of choice for just about any Linux related task besides desktop. I also like SuSe quite a bit too.

    I've been using the netbook edition of Ubuntu lately. The newest release is the first one to actually work right on my netbook. I'm pretty impressed with it over all.
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  22. Senior Member
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    #71
    Quote Originally Posted by MentholMoose View Post
    You can try OpenVPN Access Server, it's way easier to use than the regular OpenVPN. You can get a 2-user license free, after that it's $5/user (minimum of a 10-user license required).
    I want the free stuff and more than two users.

    Quote Originally Posted by dynamik View Post
    pfSense is another way to get OpenVPN up and running "easily."
    I've heard of pfSense before. I guess I should try it out when I get a chance.
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  23. Senior Member
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    #72
    In my limited exposure to Linux I have only used Fedora.

    So I guess Fedora is my fav?
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