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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Default Linux+ in the coming months

    So who is going for the Linux+ in the coming months? I would like to start a thread for everyone who wants to pool resources and kill this thing together. My target date is at the end of March so I have some time. There was/is an LPIC thread and I think something like that for the Linux+ would be cool. Any one down?

    Oh BTW I am taking the 2009 version of the test.
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    #2
    I will be here. I will probably do the old version since I have the CBT Nuggets for that version. I would like to get the fifth CompTIA cert before I get too old to click my mouse!

    Good luck!
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  4. Member prdemon's Avatar
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    #3
    Id like to get in on it. ive got two microsoft exams to kill first, but after that its all Linux.
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    #4
    I would be interested. I don't have a real need for the Linux+ at work right now but I did take the beta and only failed by less than 90 points. A good study period would probably improve that. Wouldn't hurt to have the certification I guess.
    Last edited by joecontreras; 01-07-2010 at 02:32 PM.
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    #5
    Cool. Like I said I am doing the Linux+ 2009 objectives. Does anyone have a plan as to when they are going to do it or what they are going to use. I am shooting for end of March 2009. I will use the following:

    CBTs (Linux 2005 obj, LPIC objs, Advanced Linux)
    Books

    Linux+ 2009 Study Guide: Amazon.com: CompTIA Linux+ Study Guide: 2009 Exam (9780470503843): Roderick W.
    Smith: Books

    or this

    Linux+ 2009 Syngress http://www.amazon.com/CompTIA-Linux-.../dp/1597494828

    11th hour Linux+ http://www.amazon.com/Eleventh-Hour-...d_bxgy_b_img_b

    Linux Bible 2009 possibly 2010 Amazon.com: Linux Bible 2009 Edition: Boot up Ubuntu, Fedora, KNOPPIX, Debian, openSUSE, and more (Bible (Wiley)) (9780470373675): Christopher Negus: Books

    Possibly a RHCE guide for Final Reviews
    http://www.amazon.com/Certified-Tech...2901839&sr=8-2

    I also want to review a couple of books on Sed and Awk http://www.amazon.com/sed-awk-2nd-Ar...ref=pd_sim_b_3 and regular expressions http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Regu...ref=pd_sim_b_2 and linux admin work http://www.amazon.com/Linux-Administ...2901950&sr=1-3 either as I am studying for the L+ or right after I am done. These books should take me into next year easily.

    Testing Material: Transcender: CompTIA Linux+ Transcender Certification Training - Practice Exams and Online Training

    This should be way more than enough to get me through the Linux+ and set a good foundation for the RHCT, SCSA, LPIC and beyond. That is my plan and it starts at the end of this month. Hopefully by then there will be some stuff out for the new L+. All of the testing
    Last edited by Bl8ckr0uter; 01-16-2010 at 12:55 AM.
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  7. Senior Member exampasser's Avatar
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    #6
    I might go for a Linux+ cert after I finish my Redhat linux class. I'm temped to share a VMware corporate key but I don't think my teacher would be happy if he received a call from VMware about why the key has been used a thousand + times !
    Last edited by exampasser; 01-08-2010 at 12:43 AM.
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  8. Senior Member MentholMoose's Avatar
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by knwminus View Post
    Cool. Like I said I am doing the Linux+ 2009 objectives. Does anyone have a plan as to when they are going to do it or what they are going to use. I am shooting for end of March 2009. I will use the following:

    CBTs (Linux 2005 obj, LPIC objs, Advanced Linux)
    Books

    Linux+ 2009 Study Guide: Amazon.com: CompTIA Linux+ Study Guide: 2009 Exam (9780470503843): Roderick W.
    Smith: Books

    or this

    Linux+ 2009 Syngress Amazon.com: CompTIA Linux+ Certification Study Guide: Exam XK0-003 (9781597494823): Brian Barber, Kevin Riggins, Chris Happel, Terrence V. Lillard, Graham Speake: Books

    11th hour Linux+ Amazon.com: Eleventh Hour Linux+: Exam XK0-003 Study Guide (9781597494977): Graham Speake, Brian Barber, Chris Happel, Terrence V. Lillard: Books

    Linux Bible 2009 possibly 2010 Amazon.com: Linux Bible 2009 Edition: Boot up Ubuntu, Fedora, KNOPPIX, Debian, openSUSE, and more (Bible (Wiley)) (9780470373675): Christopher Negus: Books

    Possibly a RHCE guide for Final Reviews
    Amazon.com: Red Hat® Certified Technician & Engineer (RHCT and RHCE) Training Guide and Administrator's Reference (9781615844302): Asghar Ghori: Books

    I also want to review a couple of books on Sed and Awk Amazon.com: sed & awk (2nd Edition) (9781565922259): Arnold Robbins, Dale Dougherty: Books and regular expressions Amazon.com: Mastering Regular Expressions (9780596528126): Jeffrey Friedl: Books and linux admin work Amazon.com: Linux Administration: A Beginner's Guide, Fifth Edition (9780071545884): Wale Soyinka: Books either as I am studying for the L+ or right after I am done. These books should take me into next year easily.

    Testing Material: Transcender: CompTIA Linux+ Transcender Certification Training - Practice Exams and Online Training

    This should be way more than enough to get me through the Linux+ and set a good foundation for the RHCT and beyond. That is my plan and it starts at the end of this month. Hopefully by then there will be some stuff out for the new L+. All of the testing
    When I passed Linux+ in 2005, my primary study source was the Sybex book. At that time I had been using Linux for a couple of years, though. To me the Bible series of books are more of a reference than something to study from... they are just too huge!! I've never been able to get completely through one, for any topic. As for sed and awk, they are great, but all you need to know for the Linux+ should be in the Sybex book.
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    #8
    I have started the CBT Nuggets. I had to dig all of my study materials out, and it has been a little slow getting started. And I have a Linux box with Fedora 11 on it which I have been using for several months now.

    I just got a copy of CentOS 5.4. I am going to see how that compares with the Fedora 11. But, I am thinking back to when I was a complete newby, when I was doing A+, I got a copy of every DOS and Windows version that I could find and installed each one over and over again. That was probably one of the greatest study aids that I found for the A+. I figure it should be just as useful for the Linux+.

    Good luck to everyone!
    Last edited by janmike; 01-08-2010 at 11:30 AM.
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by MentholMoose View Post
    When I passed Linux+ in 2005, my primary study source was the Sybex book. At that time I had been using Linux for a couple of years, though. To me the Bible series of books are more of a reference than something to study from... they are just too huge!! I've never been able to get completely through one, for any topic. As for sed and awk, they are great, but all you need to know for the Linux+ should be in the Sybex book.
    I remember you saying that before (about the sybex book) and I have heard good things about that book (I actually have it here, but it is the library's).
    The only reason I might not pick up the sybex book is the fact that it is out of stock everywhere and I want to start really soon (like end of month soon). Sed/Awk are on the exam. Someone just send me the pdfs so the Unix complete library so know I have a whole slew of pdfs from random books (pearl, sed and awk, vi, korn, max os, basic unix and more) so that will give me some other stuff to review.
    I also have a Bible as well, and I will use it as more of a reference than anything else. Reading it straight through is going to be some what difficult.
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  11. Senior Member MentholMoose's Avatar
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by janmike View Post
    I have started the CBT Nuggets. I had to dig all of my study materials out, and it has been a little slow getting started. And I have a Linux box with Fedora 11 on it which I have been using for several months now.

    I just got a copy of CentOS 5.4. I am going to see how that compares with the Fedora 11. But, I am thinking back to when I was a complete newby, when I was doing A+, I got a copy of every DOS and Windows version that I could find and installed each one over and over again. That was probably one of the greatest study aids that I found for the A+. I figure it should be just as useful for the Linux+.
    I wouldn't worry about learning the intricacies of all major distributions. Mainly you just need to know the two main package managers (rpm and dpkg), so for example, you won't need to know the difference between CentOS and Fedora since they are too similar. I wouldn't even concentrate that much on dpkg since it seems de-emphasized on the 2009 exam (mainly just know the main functions and switches), and instead focus on rpm.

    Installing Linux is on the exam, but the bulk of it covers using Linux, particularly running and administering services on Linux. I'd recommend doing a few installs of the current version of a couple major free distributions (especially Red Hat based ones, e.g. CentOS or Fedora), just to become familiar with Anaconda (the installer used on many distributions). Do at least one text mode install, not just GUI installs. There might be something about YaST so maybe do an openSUSE install (check the exam objectives). Also, successfully doing an install of Gentoo would help you get a deeper understanding of how some things work, even though Gentoo isn't on the exam.

    Once you're familiar with Linux installation, set up one or two machines (or VMs) with no GUI installed, and learn on those. Text-mode Linux installs will run very nicely as a VM even with minimal RAM, plus you will have snapshots so you can go back or forward as necessary. AFAIK the exam doesn't have anything about administering via GUI, and the GUI is useless in the real world anyway (even if a GUI is actually installed on a server for some reason, there are so many different GUIs and GUI tools, with varying capabilities, that it is just way easier to admin via CLI).
    Quote Originally Posted by knwminus View Post
    I remember you saying that before (about the sybex book) and I have heard good things about that book (I actually have it here, but it is the library's).
    The only reason I might not pick up the sybex book is the fact that it is out of stock everywhere and I want to start really soon (like end of month soon). Sed/Awk are on the exam. Someone just send me the pdfs so the Unix complete library so know I have a whole slew of pdfs from random books (pearl, sed and awk, vi, korn, max os, basic unix and more) so that will give me some other stuff to review.
    I also have a Bible as well, and I will use it as more of a reference than anything else. Reading it straight through is going to be some what difficult.
    Actually it looks like the Sybex Linux+ 2009 isn't even out yet (Wiley::CompTIA Linux+ Study Guide: 2009 Exam), which explains why it's OOS. Oh well. It sounds like you have a lot of resources available anyway.
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by MentholMoose View Post
    Once you're familiar with Linux installation, set up one or two machines (or VMs) with no GUI installed, and learn on those. Text-mode Linux installs will run very nicely as a VM even with minimal RAM, plus you will have snapshots so you can go back or forward as necessary. AFAIK the exam doesn't have anything about administering via GUI, and the GUI is useless in the real world anyway (even if a GUI is actually installed on a server for some reason, there are so many different GUIs and GUI tools, with varying capabilities, that it is just way easier to admin via CLI).
    My "main" desktop is a Ubuntu Server install w/ no GUI . I need to learn a little more but going through the CCNA has taught me not to be afraid of the CLI. Sounds like you know your ****. I would be honored if you dropped by everyway once in a while to help guide a young patawan learn the way of the force.

    Quote Originally Posted by MentholMoose View Post
    Actually it looks like the Sybex Linux+ 2009 isn't even out yet (Wiley::CompTIA Linux+ Study Guide: 2009 Exam), which explains why it's OOS. Oh well. It sounds like you have a lot of resources available anyway.
    I saw that. I was like WTF which one is right? I didn't like the sybex CCNA book to much (it was dry and lifeless at times) but it was very informative. After CCNA:S on the 23 (and S+ shortly after) it is full steam ahead for linux. I figure about 3 quality hours of linux study a day for some of January, all of February and most of March should be enough. What do you think?
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  13. Senior Member MentholMoose's Avatar
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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by knwminus View Post
    My "main" desktop is a Ubuntu Server install w/ no GUI . I need to learn a little more but going through the CCNA has taught me not to be afraid of the CLI. Sounds like you know your ****. I would be honored if you dropped by everyway once in a while to help guide a young patawan learn the way of the force.
    It's no problem, I'm glad to help (time permitting) since it actually improves my own skills. Last year I took a Linux networking class at a community college. It was easy enough for me to do the various in-class labs (mainly setting up various network services... Apache, Samba, etc.), so I ended up mostly helping other people troubleshoot problems in their own labs. People really managed to break things in tons of (sometimes crazy) ways, so I learned a LOT!! It was one of the best experiences I've had in a training class.
    Quote Originally Posted by knwminus View Post
    I saw that. I was like WTF which one is right? I didn't like the sybex CCNA book to much (it was dry and lifeless at times) but it was very informative. After CCNA:S on the 23 (and S+ shortly after) it is full steam ahead for linux. I figure about 3 quality hours of linux study a day for some of January, all of February and most of March should be enough. What do you think?
    It sounds like enough. Good luck!
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    #13
    I wouldn't worry about learning the intricacies of all major distributions.
    Hey MentholMoose!

    Would Slackware distro be a good practice version?
    Last edited by janmike; 01-09-2010 at 01:07 PM.
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  15. Senior Member MentholMoose's Avatar
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    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by janmike View Post
    Would Slackware distro be a good practice version?
    I haven't used it in over 5 years, so I don't really remember enough to comment. The thing I like about Gentoo as a learning tool is that during the install process, you have to install and configure some of the system daemons yourself. On other distributions, this is done for you.

    Some example daemons (with common choices in parantheses) include the DHCP client (dhcpcd, pump), cron daemon (dcron, vixie-cron), system logs (sysklogd, syslog-ng) and the boot loader (grub, lilo). As you install these, you learn what they do, as well as that there are multiple options available for these functions.
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    #15
    Unfortunately, in Gentoo you have a script (daemon) that needs parameters from the /etc/conf.d/net

    I agree with Daniel Robins that this is not helpful, since it makes network configuration different to other Linux distributions and you have no clue what ifconfig, dhcpcd, dhclient etc. really does. In Funtoo you technically start with an empty file for network configuration and put your commands in there like normal shell commands e.g. "ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.1/24", "route add default gw <someip>" or "dhcpcd eth0" etc.

    I hope this makes sense
    Last edited by disi; 01-13-2010 at 01:34 PM.
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  17. Senior Member MentholMoose's Avatar
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    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by disi View Post
    Unfortunately, in Gentoo you have a script (daemon) that needs parameters from the /etc/conf.d/net

    I agree with Daniel Robins that this is not helpful, since it makes network configuration different to other Linux distributions and you have no clue what ifconfig, dhcpcd, dhclient etc. really does. In Funtoo you technically start with an empty file for network configuration and put your commands in there like normal shell commands e.g. "ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.1/24", "route add default gw <someip>" or "dhcpcd eth0" etc.

    I hope this makes sense
    I hadn't heard of "funtoo" until now. It looks interesting. Regarding network configuration in Gentoo, it's true that you don't need to know the exact syntax of the commands. You do get exposure to the programs though, for example you can configure the switches for your DHCP client if the default isn't good enough.

    You won't often use ifconfig or dhcpcd directly to actually configure an interface, since all common distributions have configuration files for these. Mainly it's good enough to know what these programs are to be more effective at your job.

    For example, I was recently troubleshooting an error given by a software install script, saying the network interface was configured to DHCP. I checked the IP with "ifconfig -a", then checked if dhcpcd was running on the interface with "ps ax | grep dhcpcd". It was, so I knew that the interface didn't have a static IP.
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    #17
    Yapp and if you would have done it yourself, you wouldn't even have to look it up :P

    You can so easy create a oneline for that:
    ifconfig eth0 up && dhcpcd eth0 || ifconfig eth0 <whateverip>; route add default gw <whatever>

    that is easier and more POSIX standard than using some cryptic configuration files...
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  19. The whole Shebang! hiddenknight821's Avatar
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    #18
    Quote Originally Posted by MentholMoose View Post
    Actually it looks like the Sybex Linux+ 2009 isn't even out yet (Wiley::CompTIA Linux+ Study Guide: 2009 Exam), which explains why it's OOS. Oh well. It sounds like you have a lot of resources available anyway.
    Now it looks like it's available.
    Amazon.com: CompTIA Linux+ Study Guide: 2009 Exam (9780470503843): Roderick W. Smith: Books

    "BETA EXAM NOTICE
    CompTIA Linux+ beta test takers: It took longer than anticipated to get the required 400+ beta exams taken.

    We are now in the final stages of exam development, and the updated CompTIA Linux+ exam is expected to launch in January 2010. Your score will be mailed to you at that time"

    So, the big question is... When will the XKO-003 be released? I hope CompTIA kept their words, so I can buy the book already and get started when I find the time to study.

    [edit] I just discovered the unfortunate news, and I just decided not to pursue CompTIA certs until they changed their mind and keep their certs as lifetime certs. [edit]
    Last edited by hiddenknight821; 01-19-2010 at 02:38 AM. Reason: Just discovered something new
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  20. Senior Member MentholMoose's Avatar
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    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by disi View Post
    Yapp and if you would have done it yourself, you wouldn't even have to look it up :P

    You can so easy create a oneline for that:
    ifconfig eth0 up && dhcpcd eth0 || ifconfig eth0 <whateverip>; route add default gw <whatever>

    that is easier and more POSIX standard than using some cryptic configuration files...
    If that works for you, great. Linux is flexible and modular so you can certainly write your own scripts for configuring networking. However, you will still have to know how the distribution does it, if only to disable it. If you are learning how the distribution works anyway, why not use the provided scripts instead of duplicating functionality by writing your own? Further, if you do write your own scripts for configuring networking, you will have to spend even more time documenting it so that other people know what you've done.

    If the admins and junior admins who share responsibility for this box already know how the distribution works, then you can also add in some training time since your script won't adhere to the distribution standards and doesn't work with the standard configuration utilities (e.g. system-config-network on Red Hat). If you are a consultant, you will have to adhere to the client's standards, and most likely they will want you to use the distribution standard, so writing your own scripts to configure the network won't even be an option.

    Many enterprise applications require certain distributions, and will check the configuration files for certain settings. If you delete the standard configuration files and replace them with your own, those enterprise applications may have problems, and you won't get support since they will say your distribution is broken.
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    #20
    You are totally right about the default settings. Most times it is much harder, if not impossible, to disable something than enabling.

    That's why I think the user/admin should decide what/how to use it. Best example is security, if everything is enabled with default settings the system becomes more vulnerable.

    I didn't see it from the "money" point of view yet, you are probably right...
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    #21
    Quote Originally Posted by hiddenknight821 View Post

    [edit] I just discovered the unfortunate news, and I just decided not to pursue CompTIA certs until they changed their mind and keep their certs as lifetime certs. [edit]
    Linux+ is not a cert that will be changed.
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    #22
    Quote Originally Posted by hiddenknight821 View Post
    Now it looks like it's available.
    Amazon.com: CompTIA Linux+ Study Guide: 2009 Exam (9780470503843): Roderick W. Smith: Books

    "BETA EXAM NOTICE
    CompTIA Linux+ beta test takers: It took longer than anticipated to get the required 400+ beta exams taken.

    We are now in the final stages of exam development, and the updated CompTIA Linux+ exam is expected to launch in January 2010. Your score will be mailed to you at that time"

    So, the big question is... When will the XKO-003 be released? I hope CompTIA kept their words, so I can buy the book already and get started when I find the time to study.

    [edit] I just discovered the unfortunate news, and I just decided not to pursue CompTIA certs until they changed their mind and keep their certs as lifetime certs. [edit]
    Yep, I am pulling back too! A great disappointment. If CompTIA is able to pull this off, I have no doubt that all of their certs will eventually have to be renewed. I am starting on LPI. It does need renewed, but there are 3 levels and you can upgrade, just like Cisco, and not nearly as pricey as the CompTIA certs.
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    #23
    Quote Originally Posted by janmike View Post
    Yep, I am pulling back too! A great disappointment. If CompTIA is able to pull this off, I have no doubt that all of their certs will eventually have to be renewed. I am starting on LPI. It does need renewed, but there are 3 levels and you can upgrade, just like Cisco, and not nearly as pricey as the CompTIA certs.
    I don't think L+ will change. I am still going for it because my school will recognize it. LPIC are distance goals but I honestly don't think they are popular enough (yet) to help me out any.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiddenknight821 View Post
    While waiting for these routers to update (from 12.4(13b) to 12.4(15) advanced security Woot!!!) I called Wiley and they told me that the book is only available in E book form. I told them that on Amazon's website, it stated that it was available in December. They told me that Amazon was wrong. I called Amazon and they said there is a delay but it is available for order. I am going to go with Amazon being right on this one. So on Friday I will order that bad boy and hopefully it will arrive early Feb, right around the time I should need it.
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  26. Senior Member exampasser's Avatar
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    #25
    Quote Originally Posted by hiddenknight821 View Post
    Now it looks like it's available.
    [edit] I just discovered the unfortunate news, and I just decided not to pursue CompTIA certs until they changed their mind and keep their certs as lifetime certs. [edit]
    EDIT: I have just found out this effects people that currently hold some CompTIA certs such as my Net+. CompTIA never even bothered to send me an e-mail about this. I feel stabbed in the back after the entire ordeal last year to get my Certificate. TOTAL BS!
    Last edited by exampasser; 01-22-2010 at 12:16 AM.
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