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  1. Member
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    #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Patel128 View Post
    Which distro did you normally use when you studied for Linux+?
    I'd like to know the answer to this too. Was going to familiarize myself with linux again because I plan on taking the Linux+ test w/in a couple months.

    Also does anyone know of a good book to purchase to study for it?
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    #52
    After trying both Fedora 16 & 17 I have decided to go back to Fedora 8; Fedora 16 was OK, but was not a favorite while 17 was slow and gave me kernel panics. I am also using Knoppix.
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    #53
    It was '06 when I took Linux+; I'm pretty sure I used RedHat or some variant like Fedora. I consider Redhat/variants to be the best choice if you're studying for "generic" Linux exams (e.g. LPI, Linux+).
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    #54
    Quote Originally Posted by petedude View Post
    It was '06 when I took Linux+; I'm pretty sure I used RedHat or some variant like Fedora. I consider Redhat/variants to be the best choice if you're studying for "generic" Linux exams (e.g. LPI, Linux+).
    So probably Fedora is one of the best ones to become familiar with?
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  6. Junior Member
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    #55
    I started in Red Hat, Then Went to ubuntu. After the Unity Desktop came out I went to Mint. I upgraded to a video card that Mint didnt like so I installed Ubuntu 12.10 with the new KDE desktop and LOVE it.
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  7. Junior Member
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    #56
    Quote Originally Posted by ratchoke View Post
    So probably Fedora is one of the best ones to become familiar with?
    CentOS would be what I would use. It is the free version of Red Hat and red hat is far in away the most common enterprise distro.
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  8. Senior Member
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    #57
    Quote Originally Posted by paul78 View Post
    I recently switched from LFS to Gentoo...
    For those that like to experiment with Linux - I just found the perfect bootstrap distro (can't believe I didn't stumble on it before...) It certain solves my desire for a custom OS without the hassle of building X from scratch using my previous boot method. Check out Tiny Core Linux - Tiny Core Linux, Micro Core Linux, 12MB Linux GUI Desktop, Live, Frugal, Extendable - it's still a bit heavier than using tomsrtbt but a tad more convenient to bootstrap a desktop or server image. Great for control freaks.
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  9. Senior Member teancum144's Avatar
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    #58
    Workstation/PC/laptop: Fedora
    Server: RHEL or CentOS
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    #59
    Quote Originally Posted by paul78 View Post
    Check out Tiny Core Linux - it's still a bit heavier than using tomsrtbt but a tad more convenient to bootstrap a desktop or server image.
    Ok - thought I would dredge up this thread. Tiny Core turned out to be too pesky and when I finally decided to it convert to x86_64, it was not worth the trouble and hassle. So I've decided to re-bootstrap again I probably should just do from scratch but building XOrg is a hassle. I just found a new perfect bootstrap - CRUX Linux - CRUX | Main / HomePage and ttylinux - ttylinux homepage.
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  11. Senior Member
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    #60
    Quote Originally Posted by paul78 View Post
    Ok - thought I would dredge up this thread. Tiny Core turned out to be too pesky and when I finally decided to it convert to x86_64, it was not worth the trouble and hassle. So I've decided to re-bootstrap again I probably should just do from scratch but building XOrg is a hassle. I just found a new perfect bootstrap - CRUX Linux - CRUX | Main / HomePage and ttylinux - ttylinux homepage.
    The point of tasks like building X is learning. Your are downloading packages, meeting requirements, compiling, setting PATHs, etc. All items one needs to learn how to do to become an effective system administrator. It is a lot of work, but I'm looking at the end result.
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    #61
    True if your goal is to learn to build Xorg - I use Linux for other purposes. I tinker with embedded Linux appliances - no Xorg required. I just need a working version on my build host. And I don't like package managers because I have my own distro. I just need a bootstrap system.
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  13. Senior Member
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    #62
    I'm guessing most people are here for certification, and in that regard one needs to know package managers. I would also guess, the ultimate goal here is to land a job and for that one needs to know how to do all of which I previously mentioned.
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    #63
    Good point - it all depends what type of job you want to land. I enjoy Linux internals so my viewpoint is probably very different. And I'm not looking to be a Linux admin.

    I see that you have advocated LFS several times. I agree that LFS is a good way to learn and offers good foundational knowledge. My point about building Xorg is that it's not particularly challenging for me - I used to port X11 servers and clients to new architectures - so I've kinda had enough of X other than as a user.

    IIRC, you mentioned you were working in BLS - hope that's fun. I was reading some of the material last year and it's pretty interesting.
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  15. Senior Member
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    #64
    I always say I finished LFS, but in fact I went on to BLFS. I have finished the project twice. The first time a few years ago, the 2nd time I finished up a few weeks ago. I have been a Red Hat Admin in the past, today I work Solaris, but have worked IRIX, HP, and an old version of AIX. I'm tried to get certified in Linux because even though I'm certified in Sol 10, people insist on Linux certs in government jobs.

    I did BLFS a 2nd time, becuase the first time around I could never get KDE up, so I installed Gnome. This time I did finish up KDE, but added Apache, BIND, LDAP, and other servers. I prefer working on projects that don't require much direct interface with users. The Red Hat job was really backing up 80 machines and a 50 TB NetApps. That was a large NAS at the time, but not any more. Now I support servers that are accessed from through the world by users, but I have no direct interface with users, but sometimes working with other SAs and DBAs can be just as big a pain.
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