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  1. Grumpy old bugger RussS's Avatar
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    #26
    Ok - webmaster is showing me up so I better post the next question on objective 4.6.

    Qx. When working with files and using the mv command, which is the correct syntax?

    a. mv <source filename> <destination filename>
    b. mv <filename source> <filename destination>
    c. mv <destination filename> <source filename>
    d. mv <filename destination> <filename source>

    Exam Objective: 4.6 Manage and navigate the standard Linux file system (e.g., mv, mkdir, ls, rm)
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    #27
    Im thinking A.. I dont get the english usuage here. Whats the difference between source filename and filename source?
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    #28
    I say a. also.
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  5. Grumpy old bugger RussS's Avatar
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    #29
    shoot, too easy - I better think of something a little more difficult.
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  6. Grumpy old bugger RussS's Avatar
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    #30
    The first 10 lines of a file can be viewed by using the 'head' command - is it possible to view the last 10 lines using the 'tail' command?


    Y / N


    Objective 4.10?
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    #31
    yes it is
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  8. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #32
    Ok here's my next one:

    Q 8 Which of the following file systems support journaling features?(Choose 2.)

    a. ext2
    b. ext3
    c. ReiserFS
    d. Linux Swap
    e. vFAT

    Exam Objectives:
    2.7 Configure file systems (e.g., (ext2) or (ext3) or REISER)

    Answer: b and c.

    Explanation: Both the Reiser file system and the Third Extended file system (ext3) include journaling features that improves a file system's ability to recover from crashes.
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  9. Junior Member
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    #33

    Default Q8

    b & c
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  10. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #34
    I just added the first 10 questions to our test engine, you can take them here.
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  11. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #35

    Default Re: Q8

    Quote Originally Posted by copperpot
    b & c
    correct

    Q 9. You didn't configure your Ethernet interface to automatically start at boot time. How can you start it manually?

    a. ping localhost
    b. ethereal
    c. ipconfig start eth0
    d. ifconfig eth0 up

    Answer tomorrow...

    Exam Objective: 2.8 Select appropriate networking configuration and protocols (e.g., modems, Ethernet, Token-Ring)
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    #36
    answer is d.
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  13. Grumpy old bugger RussS's Avatar
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    #37
    With most Linux operating systems, where is the location for the compiled kernel?

    a. /bin
    b. /root
    c. /homes
    d. /dev
    e. /usr
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  14. Grumpy old bugger RussS's Avatar
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    #38
    Whoops

    Objective 4.5 Manage and navigate the Linux hierarchy
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    #39
    Hrm, maybe I've been playing with Red Hat too much, but I could have sworn the common directory for the kernel was /boot
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    #40

    Default Q9

    I say d. as well.
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    #41

    Default With most Linux operating systems, where is the location for

    I say the answer is e. for the compiled kernel
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  18. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #42

    Default Re: Q9

    Quote Originally Posted by copperpot
    I say d. as well.
    Answer D. is correct.

    (Sorry about the delay, have been caught up by the new test engine, I'll try to pick it up again today.)
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  19. Grumpy old bugger RussS's Avatar
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    #43
    Anybody like to try again?
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    #44
    The compiled kernel goes in e. /usr ... then usually you copy the bzImage file from /usr/src/linux/arch/i386 to /boot/bzImage...

    bin is for binary files like ls, rm, etc... so that makes no sense
    root is root's home folder that makes no sense
    no such thing as /homes
    dev is for device files such as harddrive, cdrom, serial ports, etc

    so the only reasonable answer would be e.
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  21. Grumpy old bugger RussS's Avatar
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    #45
    I guess this could be kind of tricky - the answer is /bin. Typically it is /bin or /usr /bin (and occasionally, but not often /usr /sbin), so the answer I was looking for was A. /bin because uven in the /usr directory it is in /bin.

    Prolific gets 1/2 points for being on the right track
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    #46
    which distros put the compiled kernel under /bin ? im using gentoo and it is certainly not in /bin .. but under /usr
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  23. Grumpy old bugger RussS's Avatar
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    #47
    I was thinking most - my source was the Sybex Linux+ book. Of course, I could be wrong, but asking a friend who deals with many distros he assured me that this was the common location.

    We always have to be aware that when it comes to Linux that some of the distros do things in slightly different ways. What we must always remember when sitting Linux+ is what Comptia wants Often I completely disagree with them, but if one wants that + certification then we have to put what we know aside and remember what is needed for a pass.
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  24. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #48
    Let's continue this thread

    10. Which of the following commands can be used to convert Debian software packages to RPM packages?

    a. alien --to-rpm solitair.deb
    b. deb -rpm solitair.deb
    c. rpm -rebuild solitair.rpm solitair.deb
    d. rebuild -deb solitair.rpm
    e. convert -rpm solitair.deb

    Answer: A. The alien command allows you to convert packages from Debien (.deb), Stampede (.slp), Slackware (.slp), or Red Hat package management (.rpm) to any of those other formats.

    Exam objectives:

    1.7 Identify strengths and weaknesses of different distributions and their packaging solutions (e.g, tar ball vs. RPM/DEB)

    2.17 Install and uninstall applications after installing the operating system (e.g., RPM, tar, gzip)
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    #49
    A?
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  26. Johan Hiemstra Forum Admin Webmaster's Avatar
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    #50
    Indeed, the answer is A.

    Here is another one:

    11. You have been hired by a medium-sized company to implement hostname resolution, HTTP proxy services on a Linux server. Which of the following should you install? (Choose all that apply.)

    a. BIND
    b. SQUID
    c. APACHE
    d. DHCP
    e. SAMBA

    Correct Answers: a and b. SQUID is a popular proxy server for LINUX, and BIND is similar to DNS as it provides hostname to IP address resolution, and is popular in UNIX/Linux environments.

    Exam objective: 1.6 Identify the function of different Linux services (e.g., Apache, Squid, SAMBA, Sendmail, ipchains, BIND)
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