+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 First 123
Results 51 to 71 of 71
  1. Member Extraordinaire genXrcist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    St. Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    531

    Certifications
    CCNA:V MCITP:EA/EMA2K10 MCSE:S MCSA:M MCDST A+/Net+/Sec+
    #51
    Curious as to whether or not anyone has taken into account that when it comes to a certification exam, barely passing is actually optimal? Many of us have family/personal lives which are far more important to us in the long run so is it not better to spend just enough time to 'pass' the exam? Any additional time spent is just time spent away from your family.

    The score is not truly reflective of the knowledge. It's not Black & White.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS -->
  3. Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    27

    Certifications
    A+, Net+ (2009), Sec+ (2008), MCSE
    #52
    Quote Originally Posted by genXrcist View Post
    Curious as to whether or not anyone has taken into account that when it comes to a certification exam, barely passing is actually optimal? Many of us have family/personal lives which are far more important to us in the long run so is it not better to spend just enough time to 'pass' the exam? Any additional time spent is just time spent away from your family.

    The score is not truly reflective of the knowledge. It's not Black & White.
    I agree. I'm starting my MCSE studies on Monday. My goal is 2 months to complete. Seriously, it's 6 tests, I don't see needing more than 2 weeks of dedicated study to pass these tests with the experience I have. I'm not aiming for 1000, I'm aiming for 850, and I don't care if I get a 700. It helps that I have a nearly photographic memory, I don't forget anything (ask my wife).

    The fact of the matter is that life is an open book test, even if these tests aren't. If I come across something that I lack a little knowledge to complete, I have the skills, aptitude, and resources to find and apply the solution.

    I have the experience and the references to back up this certification, and the faster I get it, the faster I can move on. If I make my goal of 2 months, I don't expect anyone to accuse me of cheating. The finger pointers here reek of jealousy and lack of real-life experience.

    In the end, the certification is just a peice of paper, and we're all "paper certified" when we pass the test. You still need to prove yourself in an interview, through your references, and on the job. You can't fake that, and aptitude and experience are worth more than any of this paper when it's crunch time.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. Drops by now and again astorrs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    3,141

    Certifications
    I have numerous certs from VMware, Citrix, Microsoft, EMC, Nimble Storage, Palo Alto Networks and more...
    #53
    Quote Originally Posted by TXOgre View Post
    In the end, the certification is just a peice of paper, and we're all "paper certified" when we pass the test. You still need to prove yourself in an interview, through your references, and on the job. You can't fake that, and aptitude and experience are worth more than any of this paper when it's crunch time.
    Well said!

    I never bothered with certs until last year either (after 10+ years in IT - I admit it, I was scared of the damn things) and I got a few strange "looks" from people when I powered through a little more than a dozen exams in less than 6 months.

    Personally I've found doing a practice test (Transcender or Self Test Software are my recommendations for providers) and going through every question in the test once, picking my answer and the having it grade just that question. If I get it wrong, or if I don't really understand why the one I chose was correct, I write down that area. Once I've gone through all the questions I have a look at my list of weaknesses and focus all my studying efforts there.

    I've tried it the other way, but after 4-5 hours of reading, etc, and having only learned maybe 10-15 minutes of new things I go crazy. My technique has been a much better use of my time... that of course may or may not hold true for you (but you do mention being around for a while )

    Best of luck in your continued studies and welcome to the forums!

    P.S. I do not recommend the above technique for people begining their careers in IT!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. bumblebee tuna Knives Out's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    91

    Certifications
    A+, CCNA, CCDA, ITIL Foundations v3, TCAP, TCEP
    #54
    Congratulations!!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Member spaat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    38

    Certifications
    CCNA, VCP, MCSE, MCSA, ITIL v3, Security+, Network+, A+
    #55
    I totally agree with TXOgre.
    It took me 4 months to knock out my MCSE. I averaged roughly 2 tests a month. No dumps, just my work experience and home virtual labs. From a work experience standpoint, I've been an MCSE for about 8 years, I just never got the cert. In the long run the cert is more political then anything. I do value my certs, but I never lose site of how important real-world, hands on experience is worth (priceless). Even the knowledge you gain from setting up your own lab and working through all the problems as you try and get it to work flawlessly.
    Last edited by spaat; 05-30-2009 at 11:42 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    27

    Certifications
    A+, Net+ (2009), Sec+ (2008), MCSE
    #56
    Quote Originally Posted by astorrs View Post
    Personally I've found doing a practice test (Transcender or Self Test Software are my recommendations for providers) and going through every question in the test once, picking my answer and the having it grade just that question. If I get it wrong, or if I don't really understand why the one I chose was correct, I write down that area. Once I've gone through all the questions I have a look at my list of weaknesses and focus all my studying efforts there.
    This is the way I do it. A quick look through the table of contents, make notes about the areas I might be weak in. Take practice test and make notes about weak areas. Study the weak areas.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Senior Member Johnny Johnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    242

    Certifications
    A+, Net+, MCSE 2003, MCTS (70-680, 70-648, 70-646), MCSA 2008
    #57
    Quote Originally Posted by Jordus View Post
    Yeah, but those camps are walking all over the line between real and dump.

    There are smart people out there, but taking 4 days to pass an exam that most people take 2-3 times and study for weeks if not months seems a little odd.

    The other thing is that a LOT of the topics on the MCSE/MCITP stuff are things that people dont normally work with on a regular job. Most AD admins work with a single domain...not 52 interconnected sites with subdomains and other domains in a massive forest mash-up.
    Yes, I would have to agree. My former supervisor went to a boot camp several years ago and got his MCSE. He said they used TK as study material for the exams.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  9. Cisco Moderator mikej412's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    10,190

    Certifications
    CCNP CCIP CCSP CCVP CCDP CCDA CCNA CS-CIPSS CS-CIPTDS CS-CIPTOS CS-CIPCSS CS-CFWS CS-CVPNS CS-CISecS ISSP 4013 4011
    #58
    Congratulations!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  10. BOBBY_TABLES RobertKaucher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lebanon, Ohio - USA
    Posts
    4,274

    Certifications
    MCSD Web Apps/SharePoint Applications, MCITP: DBA 2005/2008, EA, EDA7, Linux+, Sec+, MCSE, MCDST, MCTS
    #59
    Quote Originally Posted by LarryDaMan View Post
    Improbable but not impossible without dumps. There are some very smart people out there. People pass the MCSE track without dumps during a 13 day boot camp, so it can be done.
    I passed in just over 6 months with very little experience. I took
    270
    290 <failed once>
    291
    272 <already had 271 and wanted MCSA fast>
    293
    350
    294
    Sec+
    298

    I had three years of support experience and decided to take the 272 on a Sat and scheduled the test for the following Thursday. Passed with low 800s.
    I studied about the same for the Vista exam. On the other hand I studied for 5 months for the 431 (SQL 2005 and nearly failed). My test schedule gave me just a little more time than mad82. I had to take the 291 twice. I know some will find this confrontational, but I resent those who cannot accusing those who do of impropriety like this. I use my real name in this forum. Potential employers could see what I post and what others post about me. I would ask that Jordus etal not defame others without proof.
    Last edited by RobertKaucher; 06-18-2009 at 01:23 AM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  11. Senior Member Tryntotechit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    108

    Certifications
    AAS in CIS, A+, Network+, Security+, MCSA:2003, 70-293
    #60
    Good job! I haven't had the priviledge to get the experience you have. My MCSE is coming. Congrats.

    Edit:
    Wow. I wrote the first part before I new that there were 3 pages to this thread. I'm on my blackberry and kinda hard to see everything. Anyway

    This has been an interesting thread. Page 2 got kind of heated. I know that I hardly have any experience in IT. Been working as pc tech for about 4 months. My MCSE has taking me 2 years and still not finished. I have also been completing my AAS and trying to do the family thing. I'm glad that you had the opportunity to knock his certs out. Some people do and some people don't. All I know is I have worked my butt off for my certs and I am really proud of all my accomplishments. Good job to Mad and everyone in this forum.
    Last edited by Tryntotechit; 06-18-2009 at 03:29 AM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  12. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    5,015
    #61

    Default reply

    You know this thread has given me hope. I have had 2 very disapointing things happen to me within the last 2 weeks. The first being that I was turned down for a job that I really wanted (getting to work with an isp doing cisco, microsoft, and linux work ) and getting denied twice to go into 2nd level enginnering at my job ( the first time it was because I "don't have enough expierence and the second time they said I hadn't completed enough business classes during the course of my degree, which is in progress ).
    Because of these things I have decided to persue jobs at a local Air force base doing a contract position. To do 1st level server work, they want someone working towards the MCSE certification. I have decided that I want to get the MCP/MCSA/MCSE track done by November 22. I have not completed any of there test but hopefully before the 2nd week of July I will have the security+. From there I want to start the 70-290 and go..

    I think it will be hard because most of the people around me either don't think it can be done, or dont care at all. Most people at my job either can't or won't go for certs. I think I agree with a poster from before that we are all just paper certified when we first get our certs. I think that the same is true for anything else in life, degrees, certificates and so on. I just want to get a couple of letters behind my name, and a couple of pieces of paper on my wall so I can move up in this field. Isn't that what certifications are about, to help you move up or increase your scope?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  13. Mobo Wizard ULWiz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Florence NJ
    Posts
    723
    #62
    I am going to ignore some of these stupid posts people are posting. You should be proud of your accomplishment. Finishing the MCSE is not a easy thing. I am struggling just getting my MCSA done but also left IT for a long time. I only got 291 left but decided to focus on the CCENT/CCNA track first. I recently just got back into IT again and decided to start my IT certifications. Last year i attained 3 certs and look forward to learning more about various technologies.

    Best of luck and CONGRATS again on the MCSE.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  14. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    18

    Certifications
    CCNA, MCSE, MCITP:EA
    #63
    Thanks again everybody. I really didn't think people would get that angry on it and really I don't blame them. They might have family to take care of which should come over studying and if they aren't in a situation like I was to knock out some certs in a short time it will take you a while.

    I went back home last month and not much had changed cert wise with my old team because honestly they have no need for it. If I was still there, I probably would have never gotten it.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  15. Member rterrasi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    31
    #64
    Well, finishing the MCSE is a fantastic accomplishment, let alone doing it in 3 months. The only black eye on it would be if an individual used dumps. You learn nothing that way.

    Years ago, I was attending a tech college in California and taking the Windows 2000 course. In more than once instance, we were handed "supplemental" study material to take the actual test. At work, while I was going through it, a co worker was looking over my shoulder and recognized it as a "dump". When I asked him what he meant, he went into a detailed explanation of what it was. Not only did I dispose of it, I let my fellow class mates know what it was. None of them cared; they just wanted the cert. These were the same individuals who got certified, but could not even do a full install of 2000 server and other tasks ( I am not kidding). Although I never bothered to certify, at least I knew what the heck I was doing.

    My immediate goal is to obtain my MCSA then MCSE. I will take at least 5 weeks for each exam to study and pass the test. Might take longer, but to each their own huh?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  16. BOBBY_TABLES RobertKaucher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lebanon, Ohio - USA
    Posts
    4,274

    Certifications
    MCSD Web Apps/SharePoint Applications, MCITP: DBA 2005/2008, EA, EDA7, Linux+, Sec+, MCSE, MCDST, MCTS
    #65
    Quote Originally Posted by rterrasi View Post
    My immediate goal is to obtain my MCSA then MCSE. I will take at least 5 weeks for each exam to study and pass the test. Might take longer, but to each their own huh?

    Well keep in mind that at the time mad was unemployed... he had more time and motivation to study than most. Add that to his experience and you can see why he passed so quickly.

    I have a friend who passed the 291 on his second try with a score in the low 900s. He credits the score to having 2 weeks of basically 8 hours a day to study for it. He was in the same position as Mad.

    I'll keep my score of 748 and my job....
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  17. CCNA in progress Satcom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    tampa
    Posts
    110
    #66
    Quote Originally Posted by mad82 View Post
    Being unemployed in one of the highest cost of living cities in the country gives you motivation. I never even thought about getting my MCSE back when I had a job.
    sounds like a motivator to me .. congrats
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  18. Senior Member Turgon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    6,250

    Certifications
    CCIE counter..993 Lab Hours.... 532 Reading.
    #67
    Quote Originally Posted by Slowhand View Post

    I took my A+ in a day, and if I had the same relative amount of experience and skill with Cisco networks that I do with stand-alone microcomputers, I'd take the CCIE R&S written and lab exams over a weekend.
    That's quite a stretch!

    I agree with the general principle but one has to be careful of the comparision with CCIE. The testing there is less kind to experienced folks. I can attest to this after obtaining MCSE in 1999 and CCNP in 2001.

    While experience helps, everyone needs to accumulate sufficient hours to prepare specifically for the test because of the messed up nature of what is being examined on the part of the candidate. The time required is a variable there but a lot of what you need to demonstrate on lab day isn't learned particularly well in the field no matter how proficient you are there. If it was I imagine thousands of experienced engineers such as myself and Mike would be done by now. Some people do fast track it, but the numbers who will sail through after just a weekend of cramming I think you could fit into an elevator. Many great engineers I would learn a good deal from have been obliterated on lab day due to relying on experience at the expense of significant time out to prepare specifically for the test. They are still great engineers though. A three month stint is a heck of an accomplishment requiring lots of configuration experience going in and significant employer support to prepare. Uber configurators working big networks at the TDA level but remaining very hands on each day have a shot at that if they have the energy. Some instructors are decently placed too as when they are not teaching cisco at a low level they are preparing training materials and when not doing either there is slack time to do lots of practice labs.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  19. Questionably Benevolent Moderator Slowhand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    5,074
    Blog Entries
    1

    Certifications
    A+, Linux+, Server+, Security+, MCSA 2003, MCSA 2008, MCSA 2012, CCNA(expired), ITIL Foundation v3 (2011), VCP5-DCV, VCA-Cloud, VCA-DCV, VCA-WM
    #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Turgon View Post
    That's quite a stretch!

    I agree with the general principle but one has to be careful of the comparision with CCIE. The testing there is less kind to experienced folks. I can attest to this after obtaining MCSE in 1999 and CCNP in 2001.
    The meaning here isn't to compare apples to oranges or bottle rockets to V2 launchers. The point is that, if I'd had the type of hands-on lab-experience and book-knowledge it takes to pass the CCIE written and lab exams, I could walk in and take both today. (Kind of redundant, isn't it?) It was more of a statement pertaining to the amount of time spend formally studying - in my case of the A+, none at all - versus what people expect you to spend since it's assumed you're starting from scratch when you decide, "today I'm going to sit down and start studying for the <blank> exam."

    -------------------------------------------------------
    ITHumidor.net - "Futuaris nisi irrisus ridebis"
    -------------------------------------------------------

    Free Microsoft Training: Microsoft Virtual Academy
    Free PowerShell Resources: Top 50 PowerShell Blogs
    Free DevOps/Azure Resources: Visual Studio Dev Essentials

    Let it never be said that I didn't do the very least I could do.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  20. Senior Member Turgon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    6,250

    Certifications
    CCIE counter..993 Lab Hours.... 532 Reading.
    #69
    Quote Originally Posted by Slowhand View Post
    The meaning here isn't to compare apples to oranges or bottle rockets to V2 launchers. The point is that, if I'd had the type of hands-on lab-experience and book-knowledge it takes to pass the CCIE written and lab exams, I could walk in and take both today. (Kind of redundant, isn't it?) It was more of a statement pertaining to the amount of time spend formally studying - in my case of the A+, none at all - versus what people expect you to spend since it's assumed you're starting from scratch when you decide, "today I'm going to sit down and start studying for the <blank> exam."
    I understand your point but it's not not really applicable to the CCIE lab exam I'm afraid. The problem is it is very difficult to clear that exam unless you prepare specifically for it no matter how much experience you have. Trust me many engineers with skills to die for have tried to leverage what they already know with just a light review only to tank the test. For other exams you do get more mileage though.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  21. Questionably Benevolent Moderator Slowhand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    5,074
    Blog Entries
    1

    Certifications
    A+, Linux+, Server+, Security+, MCSA 2003, MCSA 2008, MCSA 2012, CCNA(expired), ITIL Foundation v3 (2011), VCP5-DCV, VCA-Cloud, VCA-DCV, VCA-WM
    #70
    Quote Originally Posted by Turgon View Post
    I understand your point but it's not not really applicable to the CCIE lab exam I'm afraid. The problem is it is very difficult to clear that exam unless you prepare specifically for it no matter how much experience you have. Trust me many engineers with skills to die for have tried to leverage what they already know with just a light review only to tank the test. For other exams you do get more mileage though.
    I still think our communication-towers aren't quite on the same frequency, and understandibly so. Your point about the CCIE exam being unique in that no network engineer in their right mind should have a production-environment that looks like the lab-rack is dead-on. (Then again, if my production-environment looked like my lab, I'd probably be fired for causing a fire/toxic hazard in the office.) I'm using the CCIE as a metaphor, since it is a well-known difficult exam, not as a direct, literal comparison to A+. I think we can both agree that, if a person just happened to be enough of a lab-rat to have the type of lab-experience and had read those big, thick Cisco Press books, they could pass the exam without any further formal preparation; an experienced engineer with no lab-time is definitely going to fail, as you mentioned, since the lab is designed specifically to test a broad range of skills and a real environment requires whatever skills happen to fit the given situation.

    Think of it as technical non-answers to a hypothetical questions:

    "How hard is the <blank> exam?"
    "That all depends. If you know everything you need to know to pass it, it's really easy. If you don't know enough, it's really hard."

    "How long does it take to study for <blank> certification?"
    "If you know enough to pass right now, no time at all. Otherwise, it takes exactly as long as you need to read the books and practice enough to pass."
    Last edited by Slowhand; 07-06-2009 at 06:16 PM. Reason: can't pass a written exam, doesn't know how to read.

    -------------------------------------------------------
    ITHumidor.net - "Futuaris nisi irrisus ridebis"
    -------------------------------------------------------

    Free Microsoft Training: Microsoft Virtual Academy
    Free PowerShell Resources: Top 50 PowerShell Blogs
    Free DevOps/Azure Resources: Visual Studio Dev Essentials

    Let it never be said that I didn't do the very least I could do.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  22. Senior Member Turgon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Great Britain
    Posts
    6,250

    Certifications
    CCIE counter..993 Lab Hours.... 532 Reading.
    #71
    Quote Originally Posted by Slowhand View Post
    I still think our communication-towers aren't quite on the same frequency, and understandibly so. Your point about the CCIE exam being unique in that no network engineer in their right mind should have a production-environment that looks like the lab-rack is dead-on. (Then again, if my production-environment looked like my lab, I'd probably be fired for causing a fire/toxic hazard in the office.) I'm using the CCIE as a metaphor, since it is a well-known difficult exam, not as a direct, literal comparison to A+. I think we can both agree that, if a person just happened to be enough of a lab-rat to have the type of lab-experience and had read those big, thick Cisco Press books, they could pass the exam without any further formal preparation; an experienced engineer with no lab-time is definitely going to fail, as you mentioned, since the lab is designed specifically to test a broad range of skills and a real environment requires whatever skills happen to fit the given situation.

    Think of it as technical non-answers to a hypothetical questions:

    "How hard is the <blank> exam?"
    "That all depends. If you know everything you need to know to pass it, it's really easy. If you don't know enough, it's really hard."

    "How long does it take to study for <blank> certification?"
    "If you know enough to pass right now, no time at all. Otherwise, it takes exactly as long as you need to read the books and practice enough to pass."

    hehehe..well with that going for them, yes they could pass, but I think if someone had that type of lab-rat experience they could only have acquired it through preparation for the exam and not through OTJ. Experience helps a lot but without plenty of preparation for the exam itself it's most likely not going to get you through.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 First 123

Social Networking & Bookmarks