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  1. Member
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    #1

    Default Setting up VM lab....stuck on something easy...

    So i'm just now setting up my VM lab while I wait for my MS press books to come in to start studying. This is my first time ever messing with servers besides remoting in to restart services etc so it's all semi-new to me.

    I have a server 2003 R2 machine setup as my DC, all i've done so far is install DCHP/DNS/AD and created a test domain

    I have a server 2008 R2 machine setup that i've done nothing to but join to the domain, I will run ADPREP on my 2003 machine later and also make this machine a DC

    I have a Windows 7 machine running that's added to the domain


    My issue is that for some reason I can't ping between machines by either IP address or name. When I ping by name it will resolve the IP address that's assigned to the machine... but I get a request has timed out response. I know this is something simple but i'm not sure why i'm unable to ping other machines on the domain, DNS appears to be correct since it's resolving the name... does it have something to do with my VM's running a bridged NAT connection?
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  3. Senior Member
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    #2
    Make sure Windows Firewall or another firewall isn't blocking the ping. Some firewalls automatically block ICMP Packets.
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  4. Member Norrlands Turk's Avatar
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    #3
    Windows Firewall blocks echo requests by default in Server 2003. So probably thats what it is.
    I would also suggest setting up the virtual network in a isolated environment first, not with bridged NAT settings.
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  5. California Kid JoJoCal19's Avatar
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    #4
    What Norrlands Turk said is correct. For creating a virtual network between VM's it is recommended to use the host network option in VMWare. That is what I found on a VMWare how-to and that is what I used in setting up my 2008 Server DC and two XP Pro workstations and joining them to the domain.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, GCIA, GSEC, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, BSBA - University of Florida, MSISA - WGU
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  6. Member
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    #5
    Well, ASSUMING you are using VM_Ware... setting up the virtual networks is much easier using VM Ware Workstation than Player. If you are using VM Ware hopefully you have Workstation because it has the builtin network editor. The trick I have found in VM Ware is to use the bridged without NAT. Bridged is perfectly fine and actually (I think ) preferred as it all it does really is allow you to bind the virtual machine ip address to the physical network adapter in the computer. That makes it REAL easy to get Internet access through your host machine. So, you have a wireless network behind a NAT router at the house. I recommend configuring the host machine with a static ip like 192.168.0.25. Make sure you can access Internet with that from the host. Then you can set your guest to whatever private ip you want on a differnt subnet. As long as all guests use the same bridged physical adapter they can talk to each other PLUS machines on other boxes that connect physically to that box. For example, I have 3 boxes on a wireless network. IP addresses are 10.0.0.1 3 and 5. On the 10.0.0.1 box I host virtual machines on a 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.2.0 subnet. That's my stub and perimeter virtual network. Box 2 is 10.0.0.3 and hosts the PHOENX Site running a 172.16.1.0 subnet and Box 3 is 10.0.0.5 and hosts the STLOUIS Site running a 172.16.0.0 subnet. All the virtual machines in all 4 subnets can communicate over the existing wireless link between each other and the internet. I use Virtual PC 2007 for all my machines but you can easily do the same using VM Ware Workstation. The trick is bridged only, no nat, I am telling you dude. It works beautifully and makes everything so life like. I even port forward from my real router to virtual machines on the GATEWAY Box and I can remote in via VPN access my email with Outlook Web Access from any Internet computer, etc. You got to go bridged man. That NAT setting adds DHCP servers and subnets you don't want or need. You want to make your OWN Dhcp servers and subnets, right?! That's the whole point! Have fun, man. It really rocks when you get it going and see what you can do and how far you can take it.
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  7. Senior Member MentholMoose's Avatar
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    #6
    I typically use bridged as well, since typically a flat network is fine. However, in some cases you need a more complicated network structure. If you want to lab multiple AD sites, it's better to have multiple subnets so it's similar to the real world. Also when labbing advanced DHCP configuration, like multiple scopes, you need multiple subnets.
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  8. Member
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    #7
    And you can do all that using bridged networking. I run a multi site and multi subnect AD Domain spanning 3 different geographical sites using bridged networking on every single virtual machine. The STLOUIS subnet is 172.16.0.0 the PHOENIX subnet is 172.16.1.0 and the DMZ subnet is 192.168.2.0 Each subnet is on a seperate host system and they are connected by one Server 2003 VM running RRAS and also serving as the VPN server and Front End Exchange server.
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  9. Senior Member MentholMoose's Avatar
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by sschmidlap View Post
    And you can do all that using bridged networking. I run a multi site and multi subnect AD Domain spanning 3 different geographical sites using bridged networking on every single virtual machine. The STLOUIS subnet is 172.16.0.0 the PHOENIX subnet is 172.16.1.0 and the DMZ subnet is 192.168.2.0 Each subnet is on a seperate host system and they are connected by one Server 2003 VM running RRAS and also serving as the VPN server and Front End Exchange server.
    For just having multiple sites and subnets, bridging everything to one physical network will be fine. I wanted to simulate multiple subnets in one site, with one DHCP server for all subnets in the site, using a DHCP forwarder (e.g. ip helper-address). AFAIK in this case the subnets need their own broadcast domain.
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  10. Senior Member sina2011's Avatar
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    #9
    hey Dryst999

    yeah try putting the network adapter in bridged mode and also if it still doesnt work on both servers from a elevated prompt type:

    netsh firewall set icmpsettings 8 enable

    it should do the trick see how you go.
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