+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    DC Metro Area
    Posts
    46

    Certifications
    A+, N+, Sec+, MCP NT4, MCTS Configuring Win7, MCITP Enterprise Desktop Administrator, AAS Computer Engineering
    #1

    Default Already MCTS/MCITP for windows 7 administration...MCSA a quick logical step?

    Just want to get some acronyms and quick knowledge under my belt. Now that desktop engineering pays as well as server duties I have little interest in dealing with servers.

    However, since I have already passed the 70-680 exam and have a Security+, I see that I only have 2 other exams to go to get the MCSA.

    However fear does have the better of me in that I really have no aptitude or interest on the networking side.

    I also hear that those exams are tough (at least one of them) and I am worried about passing them.

    Any thoughts on whether or not I might want to pursue that path and maybe take the upgrade path for MCITP EA? Seems to me I won't have time to do that. It also seems to me that more employers know what an MCSA is rather than what an MCITP is but that may or may not last.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks
    Last edited by 12334; 09-16-2011 at 12:33 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS -->
  3. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,666

    Certifications
    MCSE: Security, MCTS x 5, P+, S+, N+, A+, HIT
    #2
    Quote Originally Posted by 12334 View Post
    Just want to get some acronyms and quick knowledge under my belt. Now that desktop engineering pays as well as server duties I have little interest in dealing with servers.

    However, since I have already passed the 70-680 exam and have a Security+, I see that I only have 2 other exams to go to get the MCSA.

    However fear does have the better of me in that I really have no aptitude or interest on the networking side.

    I also hear that those exams are tough (at least one of them) and I am worried about passing them.

    Any thoughts on whether or not I might want to pursue that path and maybe take the upgrade path for MCITP EA? Seems to me I won't have time to do that. It also seems to me that more employers know what an MCSA is rather than what an MCITP is but that may or may not last.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks
    For the MCSA, you would need the 290 and 291. 290 is easy, 291 is more difficult. You could do the MCSA and then get the MCITP:SA. There is time for getting the MCSA/MCSE still. I haven't heard anything about M$ retiring those exams yet. Name recognition for the MCITP certs continues to grow and many employers are familiar with them.
    As far as networking, if you are going to work in IT, you need to be be comfortable with networking. Aptitude can be worked with, but if you are not interested in networking, there are lots of other areas to try out.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. PMP-Wannabe! erpadmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    4,133

    Certifications
    A+, Network+, Security+, Project+, MCTS 70-680, MCITP:EA or MCSA:WS2K8, Bachelor of Science, IT - Networks Design and Management
    #3
    There isn't that much difference from W2K8R2 than there is from W2K3....if you can administer a W2K8 R2 server without Server Manager or Powershell, you can work on a W2K3 box.


    Technet is an excellent place to start to view those comparisons:

    Windows Server
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. Senior Member Devilsbane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    4,203

    Certifications
    MCSE:Security, MCDST, A+, Network+, Security+, ITIL V3 Foundations, ITIL 2011 Intermediate: Service Transition, MOS 2007 (MCAS) BAS Computer Forensics
    #4
    I'd probably do it. 2 tests for MCSA...
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Senior Member Mike-Mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,848

    Certifications
    CISSP, HDI-SCA, ITIL V3 Foundations, A+, Network+, Security+, MCP, MCDST, CCENT, CCNA, Project+, CCNA Security, MCTS: Windows 7 Config, CEH, CHFI
    #5
    I have Security+ already, and I have to do Windows 7 for school, so when that's done, I plan on going for 2 more tests to get a MCSA.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. PMP-Wannabe! erpadmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    4,133

    Certifications
    A+, Network+, Security+, Project+, MCTS 70-680, MCITP:EA or MCSA:WS2K8, Bachelor of Science, IT - Networks Design and Management
    #6
    Most WGU IT students/graduates could take the two exams for MCSA, because if they graduate they would have Security+ and 70-680 in their background or even A+/Network+ and 70-680. (I know for sure the NDM and NA tracks.)

    Just because you can do something, doesn't mean you should. Rather than spending money and time on certs that will retire any day now, you could spend that same energy and resources on another Microsoft Technology like Exchange, SQL Server, or perhaps go the Cisco route with a CCNA.

    As I stated earlier, I've been dealing with Microsoft Servers since NT....2008 MCITP:EA will be the first time I get certified in MS technology and that's only to satisfy both a college degree and prior commitments to myself. Some of you weren't even hitting puberty when I was configuring my first Compaq Proliant server as part of a Citrix farm back in 1997.

    The goal is to go forward, not backward.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Senior Member Devilsbane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    4,203

    Certifications
    MCSE:Security, MCDST, A+, Network+, Security+, ITIL V3 Foundations, ITIL 2011 Intermediate: Service Transition, MOS 2007 (MCAS) BAS Computer Forensics
    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by erpadmin View Post
    Rather than spending money and time on certs that will retire any day now, you could spend that same energy and resources on another Microsoft Technology like Exchange, SQL Server, or perhaps go the Cisco route with a CCNA.

    The goal is to go forward, not backward.
    Microsoft Certification Exam Development l New Certification Exams l Discontinued IT Exams

    Microsoft has made the announcement for June 30th of 2012, and neither the 290 or the 291 are on the list. I learned a lot of things from these exams. Like you said, the goal is to go forward, and for someone who just needs to get some stuff on paper it would be moving forward.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  9. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    DC Metro Area
    Posts
    46

    Certifications
    A+, N+, Sec+, MCP NT4, MCTS Configuring Win7, MCITP Enterprise Desktop Administrator, AAS Computer Engineering
    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Psoasman View Post
    For the MCSA, you would need the 290 and 291. 290 is easy, 291 is more difficult. You could do the MCSA and then get the MCITP:SA. There is time for getting the MCSA/MCSE still. I haven't heard anything about M$ retiring those exams yet. Name recognition for the MCITP certs continues to grow and many employers are familiar with them.
    As far as networking, if you are going to work in IT, you need to be be comfortable with networking. Aptitude can be worked with, but if you are not interested in networking, there are lots of other areas to try out.
    Thanks for the info. Now I know what to look out for. I will probably skip the SA since the exams appear to be going bye bye in 2012.

    I respectfully disagree with a need to be comfortable working with networking. I have been in the IT field for 13 years and I am terrible with Networking. I got my Network+ long ago but the bubble burst back then and just got comfortable with the Client Side after not being able to convince anyone of my Networking aptitude. I forgot everything that I learned because there was no opportunity to work it. Actually, I am enjoying the Server side as I look at 290. I am actually loving it. All of the mysteries are making sense and it is not as difficult as I thought.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  10. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    DC Metro Area
    Posts
    46

    Certifications
    A+, N+, Sec+, MCP NT4, MCTS Configuring Win7, MCITP Enterprise Desktop Administrator, AAS Computer Engineering
    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by erpadmin View Post
    Most WGU IT students/graduates could take the two exams for MCSA, because if they graduate they would have Security+ and 70-680 in their background or even A+/Network+ and 70-680. (I know for sure the NDM and NA tracks.)

    Just because you can do something, doesn't mean you should. Rather than spending money and time on certs that will retire any day now, you could spend that same energy and resources on another Microsoft Technology like Exchange, SQL Server, or perhaps go the Cisco route with a CCNA.

    As I stated earlier, I've been dealing with Microsoft Servers since NT....2008 MCITP:EA will be the first time I get certified in MS technology and that's only to satisfy both a college degree and prior commitments to myself. Some of you weren't even hitting puberty when I was configuring my first Compaq Proliant server as part of a Citrix farm back in 1997.

    The goal is to go forward, not backward.
    Excellent presentation. I still don't feel (personally) that it is a step backwards since I can go down the 2008 MCITP EA route pretty easily from there.

    I know what you are saying and I am respectfully taking it under advisement. At least one of my collegues felt the same way as you but I explained my thought process and he now seems to agree.

    I guess I am just a little bit different than most. Thanks for your time.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  11. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    DC Metro Area
    Posts
    46

    Certifications
    A+, N+, Sec+, MCP NT4, MCTS Configuring Win7, MCITP Enterprise Desktop Administrator, AAS Computer Engineering
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Devilsbane View Post
    Microsoft Certification Exam Development l New Certification Exams l Discontinued IT Exams

    Microsoft has made the announcement for June 30th of 2012, and neither the 290 or the 291 are on the list. I learned a lot of things from these exams. Like you said, the goal is to go forward, and for someone who just needs to get some stuff on paper it would be moving forward.
    I agree here, after a 10+ year of being certification resistant, I am on a roll. The big thing is that I already have hardware that can run 2003 server ok but not 2008 server. Since I have to foot the cost of these certs on my own, I prefer to take advantage of what I have already and then if I can work my way into something that pays more I can invest in better hardware.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  12. PMP-Wannabe! erpadmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    4,133

    Certifications
    A+, Network+, Security+, Project+, MCTS 70-680, MCITP:EA or MCSA:WS2K8, Bachelor of Science, IT - Networks Design and Management
    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by 12334 View Post
    Thanks for the info. Now I know what to look out for. I will probably skip the SA since the exams appear to be going bye bye in 2012.

    I respectfully disagree with a need to be comfortable working with networking. I have been in the IT field for 13 years and I am terrible with Networking. I got my Network+ long ago but the bubble burst back then and just got comfortable with the Client Side after not being able to convince anyone of my Networking aptitude. I forgot everything that I learned because there was no opportunity to work it. Actually, I am enjoying the Server side as I look at 290. I am actually loving it. All of the mysteries are making sense and it is not as difficult as I thought.
    Are you saying that you can't even describe the OSI model, at a bare mininum? Good luck with the 291, then. I just finished taking the 70-642 which is more or less the same as the 291 as far as simple networking goes (642 more heavily into IPv6, of course, but there's a LOT of IPv4 stuff that you have to know....much like the 291).

    Remember this: Networking is the heart of IT...you can't even do help desk in a lot of shops without having, at a minimium, a basic understanding of networking. No, you don't need to be a Cisco guy to do IT, but good luck trying to specialize in something (Databases, Exchange, whatever) without knowing how a network works.

    At the very least, don't ever say in an interview you're terrible with networking.

    DC Metro is one of the best places in the country to be in for IT...your shop might be 2K3, but others will be going (if they're not there yet) the 2K8 route. If you're gonna be at your shop for another 13 years and they won't be upgrading soon, then heck, go get your MCSE.

    In truth, prior to going to WGU, like you and many others, I was also certification resistant. However, when WGU dropped the MCSE for the MCITP:EA, I was left with very little options. At least the MCITP:EA would be a somewhat equivalent of a MCSE and my resume will speak for itself on my 2K3 experience.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  13. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    DC Metro Area
    Posts
    46

    Certifications
    A+, N+, Sec+, MCP NT4, MCTS Configuring Win7, MCITP Enterprise Desktop Administrator, AAS Computer Engineering
    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by erpadmin View Post
    Are you saying that you can't even describe the OSI model, at a bare mininum? Good luck with the 291, then. I just finished taking the 70-642 which is more or less the same as the 291 as far as simple networking goes (642 more heavily into IPv6, of course, but there's a LOT of IPv4 stuff that you have to know....much like the 291).

    Remember this: Networking is the heart of IT...you can't even do help desk in a lot of shops without having, at a minimium, a basic understanding of networking. No, you don't need to be a Cisco guy to do IT, but good luck trying to specialize in something (Databases, Exchange, whatever) without knowing how a network works.

    At the very least, don't ever say in an interview you're terrible with networking.

    DC Metro is one of the best places in the country to be in for IT...your shop might be 2K3, but others will be going (if they're not there yet) the 2K8 route. If you're gonna be at your shop for another 13 years and they won't be upgrading soon, then heck, go get your MCSE.

    In truth, prior to going to WGU, like you and many others, I was also certification resistant. However, when WGU dropped the MCSE for the MCITP:EA, I was left with very little options. At least the MCITP:EA would be a somewhat equivalent of a MCSE and my resume will speak for itself on my 2K3 experience.
    Yes that is accurate. There was a time when I could describe the OSI model (some 10 years ago). However, the area that I lived in at the time (South Florida) had very little opportunity. So after interviewing many times and not being tri-lingual I just put it aside and explored other areas of IT (the client side). I work for the government now, so the server OS are going to be all over the place e.g. newer or older than the private sector.

    So are you saying that I can't pick up a basic understanding of networking while studying for the 70-291? Would I need to use other resources during that course of study? I like to keep it simple.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  14. PMP-Wannabe! erpadmin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    4,133

    Certifications
    A+, Network+, Security+, Project+, MCTS 70-680, MCITP:EA or MCSA:WS2K8, Bachelor of Science, IT - Networks Design and Management
    #13
    Quote Originally Posted by 12334 View Post
    So are you saying that I can't pick up a basic understanding of networking while studying for the 70-291? Would I need to use other resources during that course of study? I like to keep it simple.
    You won't be able to maintain servers or applications without a basic understanding of networking, period.

    You need to know how to subnet, you need to know the different classes of networking addresses. Mind you, in the real world you'll use a subnetting calculator if you have to, but for the exams, you don't have that option.

    If you have a SQL database, you need to know what port has to be available on that server and what to open on the firewall (1433...fyi).

    It just shocked the ---- out of me that you would just say how networking isn't important for an IT professional. Especially when A+ exams from the 300 series (when I took it) have a good number of questions just related to networking....

    BTW, as someone who works for government also, there a number of us who can still remember the OSI model forwards and backwards....the same mneumonic device that helped me remember it is still used by me til this very day.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  15. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,666

    Certifications
    MCSE: Security, MCTS x 5, P+, S+, N+, A+, HIT
    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by 12334 View Post
    Thanks for the info. Now I know what to look out for. I will probably skip the SA since the exams appear to be going bye bye in 2012.

    I respectfully disagree with a need to be comfortable working with networking. I have been in the IT field for 13 years and I am terrible with Networking. I got my Network+ long ago but the bubble burst back then and just got comfortable with the Client Side after not being able to convince anyone of my Networking aptitude. I forgot everything that I learned because there was no opportunity to work it. Actually, I am enjoying the Server side as I look at 290. I am actually loving it. All of the mysteries are making sense and it is not as difficult as I thought.
    I am going to have to respectfully disagree with your respectful disagreement If you are going to do the 291, you will have to immerse yourself in DNS, DHCP, RRAS, subnetting and AD --which all require knowledge of networking. You could probably skate through the 290, but not the 291.
    If someone brought you a laptop and said "I could connect to the network yesterday, but not today" what would you do? Check the network configuration. That happened to me yesterday. I checked the settings, saw they were incorrect for our site, adjusted them, and it worked.
    I think you will be limiting your education by not wanting to learn networking.
    Perhaps you could take the newest Net+ exam to get your feet wet again and then move on. The EA will probably be more network-intensive than the MCSA/E.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  16. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    DC Metro Area
    Posts
    46

    Certifications
    A+, N+, Sec+, MCP NT4, MCTS Configuring Win7, MCITP Enterprise Desktop Administrator, AAS Computer Engineering
    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by erpadmin View Post
    You won't be able to maintain servers or applications without a basic understanding of networking, period.

    You need to know how to subnet, you need to know the different classes of networking addresses. Mind you, in the real world you'll use a subnetting calculator if you have to, but for the exams, you don't have that option.

    If you have a SQL database, you need to know what port has to be available on that server and what to open on the firewall (1433...fyi).

    It just shocked the ---- out of me that you would just say how networking isn't important for an IT professional. Especially when A+ exams from the 300 series (when I took it) have a good number of questions just related to networking....

    BTW, as someone who works for government also, there a number of us who can still remember the OSI model forwards and backwards....the same mneumonic device that helped me remember it is still used by me til this very day.
    Shocked or not, I have met many people in the IT who hardly knew what an icon on desktop was. These were network engineers on our team. Often times it is who you know not what you know. That is a simple indisputable fact. If something is not used it is lost. If it did not apply based upon my job title(s) I had no need to bother with it. I have survived 13 years without performing any real networking or remembering the OSI model.

    Also have to say that I am not afraid to let potential employers know exactly what I do know or do not know during an interview. I have gained respect by disclosing what I do and do not know and sometimes have even earned a job.

    There is definitely more to IT than networking, and networking is not a pre-requisite to working in IT. Seeing is believing and I have seen it time and time again.
    Last edited by 12334; 09-21-2011 at 09:21 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  17. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    DC Metro Area
    Posts
    46

    Certifications
    A+, N+, Sec+, MCP NT4, MCTS Configuring Win7, MCITP Enterprise Desktop Administrator, AAS Computer Engineering
    #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Psoasman View Post
    I am going to have to respectfully disagree with your respectful disagreement If you are going to do the 291, you will have to immerse yourself in DNS, DHCP, RRAS, subnetting and AD --which all require knowledge of networking. You could probably skate through the 290, but not the 291.
    If someone brought you a laptop and said "I could connect to the network yesterday, but not today" what would you do? Check the network configuration. That happened to me yesterday. I checked the settings, saw they were incorrect for our site, adjusted them, and it worked.
    I think you will be limiting your education by not wanting to learn networking.
    Perhaps you could take the newest Net+ exam to get your feet wet again and then move on. The EA will probably be more network-intensive than the MCSA/E.
    That's just fine. Maybe I will take the CCENT and move on. At least I can wrap a new cert under my belt and get aquainted with networking once again. The scenerio that you described above, well I hold no issues with checking network configuration. That is baby stuff that I have encountered on a daily basis. I have never failed to resolve a network issue at that level. That is not the type of networking that I am talking about. The more advanced parts of networking never really applied to my positions. I think that I can get through the 70-291 if I apply myself but if I don't get a job in networking within a few months of taking it, then I will forget most of what I learned just like the first time. That shouldn't be a problem since I live in what I feel to be the best area for IT jobs in the USA. There again, do I really want to take a pay cut to get into networking at a higher level? I think not. Can I afford to take a pay cut? No, I cannot. Some people are in a position to take pay cuts to embetter themselves. Without getting into my financial situation, I most certainly cannot.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread

Social Networking & Bookmarks