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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Default How to connect different network in one Domain controller

    If i have two different networks and one domain controller.. how do i connect both network in my domain controller

    example : my first network : 192.168.10.0/ 24

    second network : 192.168.1.0/ 24


    currently, My server is connected in 192.168.10.0 and DNS address 192.168.10.1

    thank u
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  3. Senior Member
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    #2
    Two network cards on the domain controller - devices outside of the current network are going to be clueless as to where that DC resides unless you actually connect it to that network.

    What specifically are you trying to accomplish? If you want to pass DHCP packets past a layer 3 router you will have to use a dhcp relay agent to accomplish that.
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  4. Junior Member
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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Lexluethar View Post
    Two network cards on the domain controller - devices outside of the current network are going to be clueless as to where that DC resides unless you actually connect it to that network.

    What specifically are you trying to accomplish? If you want to pass DHCP packets past a layer 3 router you will have to use a dhcp relay agent to accomplish that.
    I am trying to form a picture how dc actually works. .

    Also ,how do a child domain can connect if it's on a different network. . If its another location how does master server establish a connection. .????
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  5. The ceiling is glass. PJ_Sneakers's Avatar
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    #4
    It's magic. That's why Cisco guys get paid so much.
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  6. Senior Member
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    #5
    As PJ said - smoke and mirrors...

    They connect to each other because they are on routable networks. While they may not be on the same subnet you can still route traffic to other subnets that aren't physically in the same location. So say you have network A and network B. Network A has your PDC and network B just has a member server. You would have to connect those two sites using some type of router (Cisco, Juniper, HP, blah blah blah) and configure the router to pass packets from one subnet to another. Once you do that a computer on Network B can say hey i'm looking for computer 192.168.1.1, that IP may not be on the same network but that router knows where to send that traffic. It's the entire point of a router and why Cisco gets paid so much money to do it.
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  7. Junior Member
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Lexluethar View Post
    As PJ said - smoke and mirrors...

    They connect to each other because they are on routable networks. While they may not be on the same subnet you can still route traffic to other subnets that aren't physically in the same location. So say you have network A and network B. Network A has your PDC and network B just has a member server. You would have to connect those two sites using some type of router (Cisco, Juniper, HP, blah blah blah) and configure the router to pass packets from one subnet to another. Once you do that a computer on Network B can say hey i'm looking for computer 192.168.1.1, that IP may not be on the same network but that router knows where to send that traffic. It's the entire point of a router and why Cisco gets paid so much money to do it.
    What I understood from ur point is

    so if a server send a query on behalf of a client for another client in different network but under same dns or pdc , it sends query to router and return to the client
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  8. Junior Member
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by PJ_Sneakers View Post
    It's magic. That's why Cisco guys get paid so much.
    lol..heaven is for whom they think it's magic and hell for who tries to solve it
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  9. Senior Member
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    #8
    I think you need a better understanding of routing in general - a lot of what you are asking for has nothing to really do with clients and servers, but more specifically routing in general and how packets are routed.

    I would look at some free videos on professormesser.com on the Net+ to get a better understanding of routing in general.
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  10. Junior Member
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Lexluethar View Post
    I think you need a better understanding of routing in general - a lot of what you are asking for has nothing to really do with clients and servers, but more specifically routing in general and how packets are routed.

    I would look at some free videos on professormesser.com on the Net+ to get a better understanding of routing in general.
    if it has nothing to do with server I need to watch more videos and learn how different range of ip work under single network

    I will defenetly take a look at those links..
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  11. Senior Member
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    #10
    How they communicate really isn't a server topic - it's a networking topic. To fully understand the dynamics on how one host communicates to another across the LAN and WAN connections you really need a firm understanding of routing. Not necessarily how to configure a server.
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