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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Default When to use a stub zone vs. a cond. forwarder

    I'm studying for the 70-640, and I think I'm a bit confused about when to use these. I've used stub zones in the past and conditional forwarders seem to accomplish more or less the same thing.
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  3. Still a noob earweed's Avatar
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    #2
    Here's a technet article that answers your question pretty well.
    Contrasting stub zones and conditional forwarders: Domain Name System(DNS)
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
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  4. BOBBY_TABLES RobertKaucher's Avatar
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    #3
    Conditional forwarders help resolve queries to any domain not recognized by the DNS server. A stup zone is non-authoritative for a specific domain. It holds the SOA, NS records, and the A records for the DNS servers for said zone. This means you nolonger need to worry about zone transfers as you would in a secondary zone (which is a read only copy of the full zone).

    This is how you might use both:
    1. You have a trust with another domain. You add a stubzone so that you don't have to worry about dealing with a secondary zone. Now your clients can resolve hosts on the trusted domain's network.

    2. You don't want to use root hints so you add Goolge's public DNS servers as conditional forwarders.

    Just a quick example.
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  5. Senior Member
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertKaucher View Post
    Conditional forwarders help resolve queries to any domain not recognized by the DNS server. A stup zone is non-authoritative for a specific domain. It holds the SOA, NS records, and the A records for the DNS servers for said zone. This means you nolonger need to worry about zone transfers as you would in a secondary zone (which is a read only copy of the full zone).

    This is how you might use both:
    1. You have a trust with another domain. You add a stubzone so that you don't have to worry about dealing with a secondary zone. Now your clients can resolve hosts on the trusted domain's network.

    2. You don't want to use root hints so you add Goolge's public DNS servers as conditional forwarders.

    Just a quick example.
    Isn't that just a normal forwarder you're thinking of?
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  6. Senior Member
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by earweed View Post
    Here's a technet article that answers your question pretty well.
    Contrasting stub zones and conditional forwarders: Domain Name System(DNS)
    Thanks! That' clears it up a bit. Weird, though, I'm pretty sure I've used a stub zone for a separate ad tree (in a different forest) . I'm probably still misunderstanding something.
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  7. BOBBY_TABLES RobertKaucher's Avatar
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by creamy_stew View Post
    Isn't that just a normal forwarder you're thinking of?
    Oooh. Good catch.
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