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  1. Senior Member
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    #26

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    I am not sure what the job market is like right now for associates in C.S. I myself don't know of anyone who has ever gotten a software engineering job with an associates. One person I know of DID get what was termed a "programming job" but all he does is use SAS to analyze business statistics; he doesn't write any modules. I agree with what was said prior, about learning C++ ahead of time anyway. But, while you are at it, I strongly urge you to look at Java as well. Nothing crazy really, just syntax, basic programs, operators, and things like that. I saw you mention that you are reading a book on Visual Basic. I am assuming that is for the .NET class? VB is not as common in the workplace as C# or Java from my experience. Just something to think about, although knowing it can't hurt. One more bit of advice though, is that when you go for your degree, you will probably only be using OOP practices, so VB will quickly become a thing of the past. I've also mentioned before that Java seemed to me to be an easier language to learn OOP with. It doesn't let you do a lot of things that C++ does, so you don't need to check for buffer overflows, invalid pointers, unused exceptions, etc, like you have to in C++. From there, the only things you really have to learn to get acquainted with C++ are pointers, headers, namespaces, preprocessor directives, and other syntactical things having to do with C++. I don't know if your school teaches it, but learning C is another good thing as well. There are a lot of things in the programming world that are still lingering around, being based on C. This will be useful especially if you do Unix programming. (Unix programming is very common because it saves companies money on volume license agreements to just develop on Unix/Linux, and then port it to Windows, so don't be suprised to have to learn Unix system calls, kernel programming, and the like).
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  3. Junior Member
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    #27
    VB.NET is a fully OOP language now, and that is the reason why I was trying to learn it, though I agree about it's usefulness and presence in the workplace. I was already instructed to move to Java and not waste time on C++ over a year ago by a developer, but things being what they are, I am forced to learn C++ if I am going to get the degree.

    If I can, since I will most likely be there for three semesters (at most) I may use that extra time to squeeze in their advanced C++ courses to make a total of 4 separate C++ courses along with their Intro. to Java and advanced Java courses. I have an e-book on C# and may get after it as soon as I finish the course. The key thing about the VB.NET is that the e-book I got is designed around teaching OOP and applying it to an "easy to learn" fully OOP language like Visual Basic.NET, as it's not for professional programmers. It goes into great detail right in the beginning about UML and then progresses into OOP concepts like classes, methods, functions, polymorphism and many others.

    BTW, I called a recruiter I know and we spoke for a while, and he made a point not to tell me that an associates would be worthless in the search for a development job. When I asked about working part-time and going to school, and how long I would have to wait before finding my way in, that's when he directed me to the school employment office, and internships as well. So maybe that's what I'll be forced to do.

    I probably won't have a choice but to break for possibly 9 months before moving into a baccalaureate program. If I finish at the end of fall 2010, the school in Europe won't admit me(if they even allow me to transfer) until the start of fall 2011. It is that point where I will have the opportunity to put the associates to it's biggest test. At worst, it should pretty much guarantee me a great pay rate as a high level tech, which is not so bad but will rot anything I've learned in school, so I'll sacrifice money for learning experience if the opportunity presents itself.

    I'm meeting with a transfer counselor tomorrow and will be filing the FAFSA as soon as possible. It looks as if I may not stop until I get the BA/BS, but I'm trying hard not to look past what will be a very difficult 2 semesters for me. Calculus I, Physics I, and the rest of my first semester will be tough to drop back into after not having math or science courses for almost 20 years (I had some maths in college when I started, but got a D in Calc I because I never did homework and stopped there).
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  4. Junior Member
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    #28
    I met with the transfer counselor and learned a little, the biggest of which is that the Euro school outside of UK/Ireland may not be the smartest option, so I'm just going to take it step by step and see where I stand after 1 semester grade wise.

    In any event, I think that the advice given to get a degree was the best, particulary for me, because in the amount of time it would take me to study for one or two certs. I could get an associates degree in comp. sci. that could get me into a much better job or even a BA in Comp. Sci or something else. Thanks. You all were a big help.
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  5. Junior Member
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    #29
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertKaucher View Post
    wannabe,

    I am very much in a similar position to you. I have no degree. I have many certifications on the admin/infrastructure side but I am trying to break into developing, .Net and Java. But the area I want to work with is essentially SharePoint. In the middle of 2008 there was huge demand for SharePoint developers, but that seems to have slowed considerably since the economic crisis. We'll see...
    Just need to ask why you want to leave the Admin/Infrastructure side and shift to programming ?
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  6. BOBBY_TABLES RobertKaucher's Avatar
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    #30
    I'm mostly interested in SharePoint and SQL Server I think those can be areas where the two sides overlap at times.
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  7. Junior Member
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    #31
    Quote Originally Posted by PeacePromoter View Post
    Just need to ask why you want to leave the Admin/Infrastructure side and shift to programming ?
    Well, to be honest, when I started it was just supposed to get me a much better job than working as a migrant laborer. I never liked the idea of helping anyone with their personal computer issues. When I made it to the help desk, talking to them on the phone became even more grueling. Developers have a much higher quality of life, and IMHO, better salaries. When I saw that I only need 2 semesters of courses to get my associates in arts Computer Science degree (with maybe an extra course or two thrown in there in a third semester), I decided that I am going to pursue at least that because I am so utterly sick of certifications as a substitute for such a low level degree. Also, on the infrastructure side, I will be able to get hired at a much better rate for a much better position with that degree than any certifications I can get in the same time period.
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  8. ITDufas TravR1's Avatar
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    #32
    Quote Originally Posted by wannabedeveloper View Post

    3) a "diversity" and humanities general ed. elective (total of 2 courses) such as:
    Elementary German I and Psychology of Women (second one may come in handy)
    technician.
    I don't know anything about women at all, but I do know German.

    Spreche ich sehr gute Deutscher.

    Need any help with that, let me know.
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  9. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #33
    It's been a few years. I hope your career path is doing well.

    The saying is, "You get out of it, what you put into it". Software Development requires a time commitment to learn and stay on-top of the career. As Technology is constantly changing.... We make good $$$$ and generally have great benefits, so it all works out good...

    1) Read various books. Make sure you understand them. Do Internet searches until you understand most topics.
    2) Pick a language to begin learning. Internet is a great resource. Look at various example and ensure you know what the language is doing (loops, functions, operators)
    3) Consider taking a Computer Programming course from a local college OR even Education Direct, or whatever online school is offering Career Diploma. If you put the effort in, these actually help. Covering everything from Logic Gates, etc.
    4) Understand clean code, code ownership, coding style.
    5) Understand version control, third-party libraries.

    Once you have a good understanding, and have programmed a few sample projects:
    6) Look into other MCP or Sun (Java) programming certifications.
    7) Once you have those, and a few years of experience, consider taking the Validated Guru - Certified Software Developer exam. This is a real gem and validates you really know what you are doing.

    During this time, if you feel pressure to obtain a Degree (although most Universities/Colleges are Paper-Mills anymore), most of the larger employers will offer tuition reimbursement.
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  10. Junior Member
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    #34

    Default Hey, what's up?

    I got notified of your reply and wanted to respond. Your advice is really good, as was everyone else's who responded to this thread. I am currently employed and writing code, among other things, and was able to get the A.S. in Computer Science. I am in the early stages of working for money and so it's a huge jump from the classroom, but like you said, you get back what you put into it for sure, and it helped a lot when I first started because I didn't know anything but basic coding of terminal programs and scripts.

    It is so much more fun to be challenged like this on a daily basis. I've gotten my hands dirty with Python, C++, C, Java, C#, Scheme, XML, CSS, HTML, Javascript, Perl, SVN, multiple distros of Linux which I enjoy, lots of Maths and Physics, Data Structures, and logic.

    Thanks to everyone who helped me, I'm not done yet but have made significant progress.

    @TravR1 Deutschland ist meine Lieblings-Land.
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  11. BOBBY_TABLES RobertKaucher's Avatar
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    #35
    Wow, blast from the past. Fast forward to 2012 and I am a SharePoint and SQL Server developer.

    Very good to see you made progress as well, wannabe.
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  12. Junior Member
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    #36
    There is no doubt that awareness to modern language is compulsory but at the same time we should practice a lot, in fact join any software house to get some expertise. because in practical field you learn a lot. I have a degree but when come to practical life it totally different scenario here
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  13. Senior Member
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    #37
    Everyone talks about Computer Science this and that, well I think for development it is huge. You can also develop connects and take internships which is a low risk way for an employer to bring you in.

    All developers that I know personally have a computer science degree, EE degree, or mathematics. Except for my mother, father, and aunt however they are in their 60's and they are all degreeless except for my father he has his degree in mechcanical engineering.

    That's all I have......
    Last edited by N2IT; 09-20-2012 at 07:19 PM.
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