+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 First 12
Results 26 to 38 of 38
  1. BOBBY_TABLES RobertKaucher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lebanon, Ohio - USA
    Posts
    4,274

    Certifications
    MCSD Web Apps/SharePoint Applications, MCITP: DBA 2005/2008, EA, EDA7, Linux+, Sec+, MCSE, MCDST, MCTS
    #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris:/* View Post
    As for PowerShell being Object-Oriented (OO) or not OO it does support OO features but when I have heard the argument before it boils down to your opinion more than anything.

    PowerShell allows the use of Encapsulation, Polymorphism and constructs.
    Well, there is a difference between OO as a style used by the programmer and the direct support of these things in the language. Even strictly procedural languages like Perl back in the hayday of CGI scripting was able to be written in an OO style. But there was no direct support for it in the language. Even today with OO Perl, it would be wrong to argue that the language itself is an OO language. I would agree that this might deppend on your understanding of what "Object Oriented" means - but as JD has said just because a language accesses objects does not mean the language itself is Object Oriented. You have to use syntatical trickery or 3rd party tools like PSClass to implement inheritence, which should win this debate. The fact is, if you are writing new, re-usable objects for PowerShell, they are being written in C# or VB.NET.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS -->
  3. Senior Member Pash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,608

    Certifications
    MCSA 2003, JNCIA-FWV, Security+ Expired: CCNA
    #27
    mannnn all this OO definition talk makes me wish I filed my notes from college better!!!! gahhhhh, I had a great analogies from my college tutor on this stuff.

    Yeh I mean the fact remains that there is no substitute when writing code that you will use again and again. It's interesting CHris mentions that C++ is considered OO but is quite lose because of C roots, I have a big chunky C++ (at least 8 years old) book sitting in my collection with OOP and OOD written all over it! Im not one to argue, you guys are a gazillion times more clued up on this stuff.

    I guess if your program/website/whatever needs to reference something simple like a....box. The fact this box changes colour, has gold leaf decorations on it is neither here nor there....its a box, it has 6 sides and 8 corners.
    “The creator of the universe works in mysterious ways. But he uses a base ten counting system and likes round numbers.” Scott Adams

    2011-2012 Goals: Improve my implementation skills. Continue C# .NET endeavours.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. Objectives my friend! varelg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    784

    Certifications
    RHCSA
    #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Pash View Post
    mannnn all this OO definition talk makes me wish I filed my notes from college better!!!! gahhhhh, I had a great analogies from my college tutor on this stuff.

    Yeh I mean the fact remains that there is no substitute when writing code that you will use again and again. It's interesting CHris mentions that C++ is considered OO but is quite lose because of C roots, I have a big chunky C++ (at least 8 years old) book sitting in my collection with OOP and OOD written all over it! Im not one to argue, you guys are a gazillion times more clued up on this stuff.

    I guess if your program/website/whatever needs to reference something simple like a....box. The fact this box changes colour, has gold leaf decorations on it is neither here nor there....its a box, it has 6 sides and 8 corners.
    Correct. Point well made. We are in the business of selling solutions, and solution has been ordered, constructed and delivered. Case closed? Nope. You can almost certainly count on your customer returning to you within reasonable time with an idea/need to extend functionality of said box. What are you going to do, re- write the code that produced the box or just instantiate from the box that was already made and simply add few more methods that will achieve what customer wanted?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. INTJ wedge1988's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    435
    #29
    Erm. You've all lost me

    An interesting read all the same, but this is where i stand so far:

    Code:
     
    Static Void Main()
    {
    Application.run(new (form1));
    }
     
    Public static void class()
    {
    int x = 10;
    int y = 10;
    messagebox.show(convert.tostring(x + y));
    }
    lol.

    I'm learning though ^.^;

    btw, i'm watching the VTC C# 2008 videos and theyre actually easy to understand!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Virtual Member undomiel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    2,813

    Certifications
    MCSA:2008, VCP4/5, CCA (XS), MCITP: EA/VA, MCSE, MCSA, Linux+, Security+, Server+, A+
    #30
    My personal recommendation from the books I've been going through from the library is Murach's C# 2008. It's a pretty refreshing break from the standard learn a programming language books as it jumps right in syntactically and administers theory in smaller chunks as you go along. Plus the examples and exercises are much more real life oriented. Hopefully I'll be able to check out the 2010 book soon. Illustrated C# 2008 looked pretty good as well though I haven't delved into it as much.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Objectives my friend! varelg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    784

    Certifications
    RHCSA
    #32
    Quote Originally Posted by wedge1988 View Post
    Erm. You've all lost me

    An interesting read all the same, but this is where i stand so far:

    Code:
     
    Static Void Main()
    {
    Application.run(new (form1));
    }
     
    Public static void class()
    {
    int x = 10;
    int y = 10;
    messagebox.show(convert.tostring(x + y));
    }
    lol.

    I'm learning though ^.^;

    btw, i'm watching the VTC C# 2008 videos and theyre actually easy to understand!
    is this how they require people to write code now?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  9. Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    3

    Certifications
    MCSA:Messaging, CompTIA A+, CompTIA Network +, CompTIA Security +
    #33
    OP,

    Firstly, if you've decided to work in C# I would say it's a safe bet. Microsoft has invested a lot of time in consolidating their flavor of programming languages under the Common Language Runtime. This fact coupled with its popularity among software developers leads me to believe that it's a paradigm that isn't going anywhere for a while.

    C# is my language of choice for .NET development, as the syntax seems to be "tighter" than some of the other languages, although when it comes down to the Intermediate Language runtime enviornment, all MS programming languages under the .NET flagship function nearly the same. Choosing a .NET language is really a matter of personal taste.

    I'll also say that programming isn't for everyone, as has been mentioned. I notice you're MCSE certified. The troubleshooting mindset that goes along with the maintenance of and Active Directory environment can prove invaluable to the development of your mindset as a programmer as the concepts you'll learn in both lend themsevles to the other.

    If you're an individual with a desire to understand what goes on behind the scenes in technology, then you should do well.

    Remember that more important than the ability to write software that inefficiently achieves end goals is the ability to really understand why what you're writing works, and how it accomplishes its tasks. If you approach development in this way you'll begin to understand so much more about the way everyday technologies interface in the (sometimes unpredictable :P) way that they do.

    My $.02.

    LCpl Ray
    Current: Net+, A+, Security +, MCSA:Messaging
    In Progress: CCNA, MCITP:EA, MCPD
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  10. Senior Member Devilsbane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    4,203

    Certifications
    MCSE:Security, MCDST, A+, Network+, Security+, ITIL V3 Foundations, ITIL 2011 Intermediate: Service Transition, MOS 2007 (MCAS) BAS Computer Forensics
    #34
    I don't think the learning will be wasted. First of all, learning one language will make another language down the road easier.

    Second of all, there is still a demand (albeit small) for Cobal programmers. Somebody needs to maintain and improve the code for all kinds of business applications that have been in use for the last 20 years. Languages don't just disappear over night.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  11. Certification Invigilator Forum Admin JDMurray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Surf City USA
    Posts
    10,596
    Blog Entries
    50

    Certifications
    GSEC, EnCE, CISSP, SSCP, CEH (ANSI), CASP, CCNA, CCENT, CWSP, CWNA, CWTS, Security+, Server+, Network+, A+, DHTI+, PDI+, MSIT InfoSec
    #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Devilsbane View Post
    Second of all, there is still a demand (albeit small) for Cobal programmers. Somebody needs to maintain and improve the code for all kinds of business applications that have been in use for the last 20 years. Languages don't just disappear over night.
    That's all well and good if you are available to move to wherever those few and far-between jobs still remain.
    Moderator of the InfoSec, CWNP, IT Jobs, Virtualization, Java, and Microsoft Developers forums at www.techexams.net
    --
    Blog: www.techexams.net/blogs/jdmurray
    LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jamesdmurray
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/jdmurray
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  12. BOBBY_TABLES RobertKaucher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lebanon, Ohio - USA
    Posts
    4,274

    Certifications
    MCSD Web Apps/SharePoint Applications, MCITP: DBA 2005/2008, EA, EDA7, Linux+, Sec+, MCSE, MCDST, MCTS
    #36
    And I still think that suggesting that a sys admin learning C# is ok because it will make learning other languages like PoSh easier is like suggesting that someone who is going to travel to Europe learn Latin because it will make learning Spanish or French easier.

    If you want to learn C# as a hobby that is one thing. I think the real reason that Wedge, the OP, might want to learn C# is because of his exposure to SharePoint! And as othrs have pointed out. C# is one of the .NET flagship languages - it aint going no place for a decade or so.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  13. Certification Invigilator Forum Admin JDMurray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Surf City USA
    Posts
    10,596
    Blog Entries
    50

    Certifications
    GSEC, EnCE, CISSP, SSCP, CEH (ANSI), CASP, CCNA, CCENT, CWSP, CWNA, CWTS, Security+, Server+, Network+, A+, DHTI+, PDI+, MSIT InfoSec
    #37
    Microsoft almost exclusively uses C# in its own products, very little VB.NET, and no other .NET languages that I know of (maybe managed C++ too?). Personally for .NET, I just stick to C# and keep my eye on what's happening with IronPython.
    Moderator of the InfoSec, CWNP, IT Jobs, Virtualization, Java, and Microsoft Developers forums at www.techexams.net
    --
    Blog: www.techexams.net/blogs/jdmurray
    LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jamesdmurray
    Twitter: www.twitter.com/jdmurray
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  14. Virtual Member undomiel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    2,813

    Certifications
    MCSA:2008, VCP4/5, CCA (XS), MCITP: EA/VA, MCSE, MCSA, Linux+, Security+, Server+, A+
    #38
    I think that a sys admin learning any real programming language will help them leaps and bounds in scripting in any other scripting language. It gets them to think more logically and take a more structured approach, and also to think in loops and recursion. That right there can cut the length of their scripts in half or more. I've always been glad I dabbled in C++ in grade school and high school.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 First 12

Social Networking & Bookmarks